Tiered Cake--Was That Supposed To Happen?

Decorating By Pebbles1727 Updated 8 Apr 2009 , 5:42pm by Cakepro

Pebbles1727 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:10am
post #1 of 24

Hi everyone,
I did my first tiered cake today and all in all I was pretty pleased with how it turned out and stayed together, had a little issue with filling bulging, but have some ideas how to work through this one in the future. The one I'm not so sure about--when I picked 6 inch board of the 10 inch, it pulled the icing up with it, so the middle of 10 inch ended up uniced. What should I have done? How do I avoid this problem with the next cake? TIA, P

23 replies
prterrell Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:14am
post #2 of 24

I use the trimmings of cake when I level the cake to make cake crumbs and sprinkle those on the icing where the plate will be. This will keep the plate from sticking to the icing.

patticakesnc Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:19am
post #3 of 24

If you cut your dowls just a tiny bit longer it may keep it from pulling that off. I have heard some say to wrap your boards in plastic or they put a piece of parchment paper between the board and the lower tier icing.

Your buldging...Did you build a dam in your layers? Did you torte them or use a full 2 inch layer? Is it both tiers or just one? If it was the lower tier did you support it with your dowls or bubble straws? It could be several things but all are an easy fix in the future.

JGMB Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:22am
post #4 of 24

I have no advice for you -- I just had to say how CUTE that cake is!!! You did a terrific job! thumbs_up.gif

dettdunn Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:29am
post #5 of 24

Sprinkle a little bit of powdered sugar where the 6" cake would be and your board should not pull up the icing.

elvis Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:30am
post #6 of 24

Very cute cake! Like the others, I cut my dowels a tiny bit longer so that the cake board rests on the dowels rather than the icing... but just in case, I also put sprinkles directly beneath where the cake board of the top tier will lay (colorful sprinkles if it's a kid's cake...and clear if it's not)

baycheeks1 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:31am
post #7 of 24

I have heard (or read) if you put a piece of parchment paper on top of the BC and under the next cake circle it shouldn't take that icing away...

Pebbles1727 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:58am
post #8 of 24

Thanks you all! That gives me some ideas to try. I have another one next week, so definitely will try something different.
Thanks again, you are all wealth of information as usual.
P

tonedna Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 3:11am
post #9 of 24

I put parchment or wax paper.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Rosa2745 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 3:21am
post #10 of 24

I usally sprinkle coconut. Good luck next time!

Justbeck101 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 3:25am
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I put parchment or wax paper.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif




Edna,
When you do that, do you sprinkle powdered sugar first? If not, doesn't the parchment or wax paper still stick?

all4cake Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 3:49am
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

I use the trimmings of cake when I level the cake to make cake crumbs and sprinkle those on the icing where the plate will be. This will keep the plate from sticking to the icing.



I like this idea thumbs_up.gif !!!!

tonedna Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 4:47am
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justbeck101

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I put parchment or wax paper.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif



Edna,
When you do that, do you sprinkle powdered sugar first? If not, doesn't the parchment or wax paper still stick?




It tends to stick some. But nothing major, already the weight of the cakes
on top have made plenty of damage on the level, so I never give a second thought on if it looks perfect or not. But..if you need to have a perfect looking cake after is unstacked, have some icing around.
Usually I dont cut my cakes..the catering person does that. But when I do, I just take the spatula and smooth it a little..No big deal.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 5:14am
post #14 of 24

I always wondered that too. I have Sugarshack's DVD and she does't show anything about putting something on top of a tier before stacking the next one (if she did I'm sorry I missed it) or maybe if a crusting buttercream would stop the icing from getting smoshed?

tonedna Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 5:31am
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupcakeshoppe

I always wondered that too. I have Sugarshack's DVD and she does't show anything about putting something on top of a tier before stacking the next one (if she did I'm sorry I missed it) or maybe if a crusting buttercream would stop the icing from getting smoshed?




I use crusting buttercream..is not about the crusting, is the weight of the cakes. Specially over 3 tiers..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 6:29am
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Quote:
Originally Posted by cupcakeshoppe

I always wondered that too. I have Sugarshack's DVD and she does't show anything about putting something on top of a tier before stacking the next one (if she did I'm sorry I missed it) or maybe if a crusting buttercream would stop the icing from getting smoshed?



I use crusting buttercream..is not about the crusting, is the weight of the cakes. Specially over 3 tiers..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif



i figured as much. then i need to rewatch that DVD hahaha

solascakes Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 6:53am
post #17 of 24

i would be scared of coconut except it's a coconut cake but i prefer patchment paper

indydebi Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 1:26pm
post #18 of 24

I've never had that problem. I never use p.sugar, coconut, crumbs, parchment or wax. My icing crusts very well. Sticky icing will stick.

In this link, you can see the indentation of the plates on the tops of the cake, which tell you the plate was touching the cake (no higher dowels). No sticking. You can also see how the dowels are somewhat below the level of the icing. http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

I think crusting icing is the key. The upper tiers are not really pushing each tier down into the next cake, because the cakes are being supported by each tier of dowels. The extra weight is supported by the dowels, much like a load-bearing wall in your home.

Pebbles1727 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 1:52am
post #19 of 24

Hi Debi,
your cake looks perfect under the plate, nothing like mine did. I used your crusting buttercream, but it still stuck. Do you think it could be because of the cardboard round I used (wilton), it was kinda wet, so I was wondering if that could be the problem. What kind of plate did you use?
Thanks in advance, P

indydebi Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 2:27am
post #20 of 24

when I used plates, they were just the standard plastic plates. I have a couple of different styles and have no idea what brand they are.

But I use just cardboards now. Was the icing crusted-dry when you assembled the cake?

Pebbles1727 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:17am
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Quote:

Was the icing crusted-dry when you assembled the cake?




Yes, M'am. It's been about two hours since I originally iced it before I stacked the cakes. Honestly, I was suprized that the icing pulled with the cardboard at the party icon_cry.gif

indydebi Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:19am
post #22 of 24

hmmmm....so am I! icon_eek.gif

Pebbles1727 Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 3:29pm
post #23 of 24

But the icing was da bomb! Thanks, P

Cakepro Posted 8 Apr 2009 , 5:42pm
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

Quote:
Quote:

Was the icing crusted-dry when you assembled the cake?



Yes, M'am. It's been about two hours since I originally iced it before I stacked the cakes. Honestly, I was suprized that the icing pulled with the cardboard at the party icon_cry.gif




That's completely normal. icon_smile.gif

As the others have advised, sprinkle a little powdered sugar on the icing where the cardboard will sit and there will be no more sticking. Wedding Cake Stacking 101. icon_smile.gif

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