Refrigerating Fondant Cakes

Decorating By kymscakes Updated 6 Apr 2009 , 10:54pm by ceshell

kymscakes Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 12:34pm
post #1 of 18

I cant remember the rule. I am making a cake with cookies and cream filling which will need to be refrigerated, but it will be completely covered with fondant. It seems whenever I refrigerate fondant, it gets sweaty and sticky after taking it out. But I think that is usually in the summer. So, is there a general rule about this?

17 replies
brincess_b Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 1:05pm
post #2 of 18

if your filling needs refridgerated, then you will need to refridgerate the cake. unfortunately, that means you will need to take your chances with the fondant.
i dont need to put my cakes in the fridge, so i dont have personal experience, but aparently some fondants do better in the fridge than others.
when you take it out, let it sit and come to room temperture. hopefully the condensation will just evaporate, but some people will use a hairdrier on it to help it along!
xx

Caths_Cakes Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 7:35pm
post #3 of 18

Ive found any fondant in a fridge will go sweaty and sticky and colours run and it goes such an awful mess it aint worth it. Is there no way at all you can cover with fondant at the last minute??

tonedna Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 7:49pm
post #4 of 18

You can do bettercream for the cookies and cream and it holds well out of the fridge..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

m1m Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 7:49pm
post #5 of 18

I've had the same experience as Caths_cakes.

Although, I know some people do refrigerate it.

That's why I don't do any filling that needs to be refrigerated with my fondant cakes.

regymusic Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 8:41pm
post #6 of 18

In cool weather, when the humidy is low, the risk of condensation is extremely low. It's not that condensation doesn't happen, but that the rate of evaporation is fast enough so that condensation does not appear to happen.

In warm weather and high humidty, there is no way for the moisture cause by condensation to evaporate. This can often spell disater as noted by some of the preceeding comments. One way to combat this is air conditioning, which removes moisture from the air and encourages the evaporation of any moisture on the cake.

I created a cake once on a slightly warm day not realizing the humidity was high. The cake became tacky. I turned on the air conditioning, placed a fan in front of the air condtioner and the cake in front of the fan. Inside of 30 minutes my cake had lost its tackiness.

tonedna Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 8:44pm
post #7 of 18

The biggest issue with the condensation is that if you have colors the condensation might ruin the colors.
Edna


*edit cause i can't type!* icon_rolleyes.gif

kymscakes Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 8:45pm
post #8 of 18

Thats what I was thinking...shoot. I don't even know what bettercream is and in my experience, mixing the cookies with plain buttercream makes it way too sweet. Any other ideas?

tonedna Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 8:50pm
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kymscakes

Thats what I was thinking...shoot. I don't even know what bettercream is and in my experience, mixing the cookies with plain buttercream makes it way too sweet. Any other ideas?




Yes it would be too sweet with the buttercream. The other idea would be the whipped box topping from wilton. But I would suggest to ask people around you where to find the bettercream in your area. Maybe someone here in CC knows the answer. Is worth your time. And would solve you a lot of problems.
Not only that..you can do so many other fillings with it, like strawberries and cream, rasberries and cream, chocolate mousse and so many others.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

kymscakes Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 9:43pm
post #10 of 18

I feel like I should risk it with the condensation. I have made cakes for the same people several times before and she very specifically asked for the same filling I have made before. I am in buffalo and woke up to a couple inches of snow today so I don't think I will have too big of a problem...hope not!

tonedna Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 9:58pm
post #11 of 18

Wish you best of luck!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

kymscakes Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 1:03am
post #12 of 18

changed my mind, gonna cover it last minute...thanks for everyones help!

PinkZiab Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 4:24am
post #13 of 18

I use satin ice fondant exclusively, and I refrigerate ALL of my cakes without exception. It's never been a problem. When it's extremely hot I make sure to have the AC cranking on high and a dehumidifier running before any cakes come out of the fridge.

Cakepro Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 6:01am
post #14 of 18

(I am not stalking you, pinkziab, I promise!)

I do exactly as pinkziab does, because I'm sorry, Bettercreme just grosses me out! And how boring would cakes be if one could only use fillings that did not require refrigeration? Have you never filled cakes with creme anglaise, or a homemade lemon curd, or real mousse?

If your house is air conditioned and you have a tabletop fan, condensation should not be a problem. I live on the Gulf Coast and have never had a cake ruined by condensation after being refrigerated.

You can airbrush your entire cake with vodka before refrigerating, and when you bring it out, the condensation is very fine and evaporates quickly.

majka_ze Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 7:22am
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caths_Cakes

Ive found any fondant in a fridge will go sweaty and sticky and colours run and it goes such an awful mess it aint worth it. Is there no way at all you can cover with fondant at the last minute??



It isn't any fondant. I work with homemade fondants exclusively and there is one you can refrigerate as you wish and another one will make exactly what you describe.
But you can work against it.
First - part of the problem can be the filling itself. Make good buttercream dam (plain buttercream, not stretched with flour cooked in water or milk or similar).
Second part of the problem can be your fridge. If it is the modern, self-defrosting sort - crank the fridge on max. I keep my fridge on setting 1, you can sometimes see water drops on the back side. As soon as the "sweating" fondants goes there - the fridge goes on max and all this drops are freezed.

Best you can do - test it before you need it. Lay two pieces of your fondant in the fridge. One plain one, only to see how it behaves. Second one - lay a spoon of your filling on top of it. Best is to test it with the filling you use. Risky are cream cheese fillings or fillings with milk in it (not spoon but from about 1/2 cup per stick butter up). You need to know how your fondant behaves and then you can do something with it.

ceshell Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 8:03am
post #16 of 18

As mentioned, Satin Ice does not sweat if refrigerated nor does Michele Foster's Delicious Fondant (recipe here on CC) if you prefer to make your own. Those are the only two I now use because I usually use IMBC and/or refrigerated fillings. MacsMom has posted her fondant recipe for a MMF that she swears doesn't sweat...I can't recall if she posted the recipe in the recipies section or if it was only in a thread.

I have refrigerated Rhonda's MMF with thumbsdown.gif results. A pastel cake I did just got sticky and shiny and the gloss never completely evaporated (yes it was summer but summers are dry out here) and I did cupcakes with colored MMF accents, and those bled like a mutha'. Ya know, I did one other white MMF covered cake and it did not sweat/sweating was minimal. I have no idea how that happened :confused:.

clovely Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 6:02pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by majka_ze

It isn't any fondant. I work with homemade fondants exclusively and there is one you can refrigerate as you wish and another one will make exactly what you describe.




What fondant can you refrigerate as you wish??

ceshell Posted 6 Apr 2009 , 10:54pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by clovely

What fondant can you refrigerate as you wish??


Michele Foster's Fondant! thumbs_up.gif found here in the recipe section.

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