How Do I Bake A Cake And Cupakes At The Same Time?

Decorating By mellee Updated 4 Apr 2009 , 12:22pm by mellee

mellee Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:22pm
post #1 of 15

Howdy all. I've read a lot of recipes on here that make enough batter for X amount of cake layers with X amount left over for cupcakes. Like I'll see a recipe that yields enough batter for two 9" pans and 6 cupcakes.

The idea sounds good because then you don't waste any batter, but here's the thing: Can I bake the layers and cupcakes at the same time? If I do, the cupcakes will obviously be done before the cake and if I open the oven to test them and/or take them out, I risk having my cake fall. I can't leave them in the oven the same amount of time, of course, or they'll burn. If I put them in midway through the cake baking, I still risk the cake falling. If I wait and put them in after the cake has baked, then the batter will have been sitting out for a quite a while, and I've heard that cake batter should be used right away, especially ones made from mixes or based on mixes, as I use. I read that this is because batter based on baking soda/baking powder gets its maximum leavening power as soon as the ingredients are moistened. Leaving it for a while can cause a cake to rise poorly or be dense and tough. Or so I've heard.

So how do I do this?? Thanks for any help!

14 replies
aundron Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:34pm
post #2 of 15

I'm not an expert or anything like that; but, I've baked cakes and cupcakes at the same time and have had no problem with the cupcakes coming out before the cake is done!!

I might be wrong, so, I guess we can wait and see what other folks say.

all4cake Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:34pm
post #3 of 15

Well, I leave pans of cupcakes out for several hours(with a sheet of parchment over them) while I'm baking several rounds of cakes without ill effect on 'em. I usually leave them until last because they're usually 'extras'. Sometimes, I portion the excess into a lined muffin/cupcake pan and stick pan and all into the deep freezer until they're frozen solid then transfer them to a labeled freezer bag that is then put into a tote marked 'cupcakes'. When I want cupcakes, I remove how ever many cupcakes I want, place them into a muffin/cupcake pan and bake as usual, extending baking time usually by only a few minutes.

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:35pm
post #4 of 15

Girlllll, cakes are NOT that delicate! You can certainly take the cupcakes out of the oven without risk to your cake.

bakery_chick Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:36pm
post #5 of 15

I usually put everything in at the same time and hope for the best.

Caralinc Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:51pm
post #6 of 15

I have baked a cake and cupcakes at the same time. When removing the cupcakes I have not experienced my cake falling in. I have done this many times. Should not be a problem.

Caralinc Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:51pm
post #7 of 15

I have baked a cake and cupcakes at the same time. When removing the cupcakes I have not experienced my cake falling in. I have done this many times. Should not be a problem.

JanH Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:00pm
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mellee


... and I've heard that cake batter should be used right away, especially ones made from mixes or based on mixes, as I use. I read that this is because batter based on baking soda/baking powder gets its maximum leavening power as soon as the ingredients are moistened. Leaving it for a while can cause a cake to rise poorly or be dense and tough. Or so I've heard.




Cake mixes and most scratch bakers use double acting baking powder. What this means is that the baking powder is 1st activated when liquid is added, with a 2nd activation when heat is applied (during baking).

As a result, cake batter can sit without losing its ability to rise properly; it can also be refrigerated and/or frozen without losing its ability to rise.

History of baking powder, with photos of brand name single and double acting formulas:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/BakingPowderHistory.htm

HTH

P.S. A dense or heavy cake is usually caused by mismeasuring the flour (scoop and drag rather than aerate and spoon measure) or overmixing which develops the gluten.

Handy cake troubleshooting charts:

http://tinyurl.com/2p5bdu

http://tinyurl.com/6lpjww

http://tinyurl.com/32goqe

http://tinyurl.com/6c745g

For additional info on mastering cake making techniques and science of baking:

www.joyofbaking.com

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:29pm
post #9 of 15

Ditto Jan.

I hold batter in the fridge ALL the time.

indydebi Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 9:11pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Girlllll, cakes are NOT that delicate! You can certainly take the cupcakes out of the oven without risk to your cake.



my thoughts exactly. Unless you have a habit of kicking the door closed with your foot or something, there is no big deal about opening a door and removing a tray of cupcakes. This aint' I Love Lucy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Ditto Jan. I hold batter in the fridge ALL the time.



Ditto this one, too.

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 9:15pm
post #11 of 15

Indy and I share a brain. icon_smile.gif

So far, it's working great.

KrissieCakes Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 9:32pm
post #12 of 15

Jan, you come up with some of the best links! Reading through the links that you post really helps me understand what I'm doing a lot better. I have always just done what the recipe says, not really knowing the how's and why's of baking. Thank you for being so helpful!!

mcook1670 Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 9:32pm
post #13 of 15

Hey Leah, I went to Sullivan in Louisville too... I like your website!

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 10:20pm
post #14 of 15

::waves:: Hi MCook1670. You have a PM.

mellee Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 12:22pm
post #15 of 15

Wow and DOUBLE WOW!! Thanks so much for all those replies!! This is wonderful, and you lades are all just great!

I didn't mean to make it sound like I'd treat my batter with kid gloves, it's just I've read so many places--right on this forum--about cakes falling (which has never happened to me yet, knock on wood!), and it freaked me out because I've never done a cake and cupcakes at the same time. I'm not a commercial baker; I just bake at home. Anywho, you've all given me the confidence to do so.

And the big BONUS, of course, is all the information that Jan posted--my god, I could kiss her! icon_biggrin.gif

And plus all4cake is a subtle genius because I never even thought about freezing pre-portioned-out batter right into the cupcake liners, then popping them out of the pan and stashing 'em away! It has probably been talked about before on this forum, but I'm new here, and I tell you I'm soaking this stuff up like a sponge! I *USED* to think I was a pretty talented chef, having been cooking/baking for over 30 years. But after coming here, I find there is much to learn still, and it's wonderful!

Thank you all! icon_smile.gif

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