Reach In Refrigerators

Business By loriemoms Updated 3 Apr 2009 , 9:06pm by LaBellaFlor

loriemoms Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 11:32pm
post #1 of 11

I have a question about reach ins. We bought a used True and it is working great! The problem is, I put some crumb coated cakes in it and the next day they were covered with condensation. The guy we bought it from told us its because its not getting enough ventilatin. We didnt believe that, so we called True. They told us that all reach ins are not made for bakeries, but for restaurants and do not have dehumidifiers in them. He suggested we turn the temp way down and if we wanted, we could have them come and disable the fan, so only the condensor will cool the unit (the fan circlulates more moisture) We also are going to be put damp rid on the bottom of the fridge hoping this weill help

My question is do ANY of you have a reach in and have this problem? (this is a double door) If so, how do you solve and how do you live with it if you can't solve it? What do you do to refrigerate your big cakes?

Thanks!

10 replies
loriemoms Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:14pm
post #2 of 11

Ok, I will rephrase this..what do you do for refrigeration?

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:40pm
post #3 of 11

Yaknow, I worked briefly in bakery kitchens and we had a True reachin, and then later a walkin.

But the real question is are you sure you need to refrigerate the cake overnight?

loriemoms Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:58pm
post #4 of 11

do you know if they used it to for cakes?

and yes, I do my cakes on thursdays and fridays (I have too many to do them all on friday) and so they have to be refrigerated. I also prefer transporting a cold cake. Easier to handle.

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:25pm
post #5 of 11

I guess I'm not going to be any real help, because I would not refrigerate a cake in the first place.

loriemoms Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:52pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I guess I'm not going to be any real help, because I would not refrigerate a cake in the first place.




You dont even refrigerate them to ice them? I find a warm cake very hard to ice.

LaBellaFlor Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 6:07pm
post #7 of 11

I only refrigerate after I crumb coat myself. After the final frosting or covering with fondant, I leave them outside. Refigerating baked goods actually dries them out. Of course theres always heavy syrup to conteract that. I hope you can find out, cause I want to know too!

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 6:08pm
post #8 of 11

Well, mine start out of the freezer, so they're cold. icon_smile.gif Then filled and wrapped in film to settle then iced for real. But yes, I ice them at room temp. I use a soft non-crusting bc, though.

loriemoms Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 8:24pm
post #9 of 11

What do you guys do on hot humid days..even with the AC going, buttercream just gets yecky looking sitting out all day on a cake...

leah_s Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 8:50pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

What do you guys do on hot humid days..even with the AC going, buttercream just gets yecky looking sitting out all day on a cake...




I live in the Ohio Valley and here the humidity and the temp are the same number. icon_smile.gif

I don't find that anyting happens to bc as it sits out. It just crusts over ever so slightly.

LaBellaFlor Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 9:06pm
post #11 of 11

You know I live in VA & it gets pretty humid here. I haven't had any problems with cakes sitting in a house with the a.c. on or with transporting them & a car w/ the a.c. on. I also use IMBC. I don't really do anything. Once it's cool, it stays looking nice.

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