Oh, Help!!

Decorating By CakesbyBecca Updated 5 Apr 2009 , 4:04pm by CakesbyBecca

CakesbyBecca Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:39pm
post #1 of 26

I've been working on a cake all week. 2 tiers and a carved pirate ship on the top. 15" of cake, plus 8" masts on top. A friend is coming to pick it up tomorrow and will be driving it 1.5hrs home. She writes me and tells me that she plans to put it in a shallow box, put some towels on the seat to make it flat and strap a seat belt around the box icon_surprised.gificon_cry.gif I reply back to her that you can't put a cake on a lap or on a seat. It has to go on the floor. Here's her response:
"No, no, no....cutting down a box to 5-6" like you said, fold blakets under box so it sit's straight up & down on the seat....we're in a car, don't have room on the floor....don't trust trunk"

What do I do?![/quote]

25 replies
PinkZiab Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:42pm
post #2 of 26

I've delivered cakes on the seat of my car, fully stacked, in a full shipping box (not understanding the shallow box thought), strapped in, with no problems at all.

KoryAK Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:45pm
post #3 of 26

Make her sign off that it was in good condition and whatever happens while driving is not your issue. Once she has the cake in hand you can't control what she does with it. If she doesn't want to listed to your advice.... her problem.

lainalee Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:03pm
post #4 of 26

You can give them advise, but you can't make them take it. Since it is carved it must be dense. And two tiers, you must be using dowels or some sort of support systemt. so if it is constructed correctly, as I am sure it must be to pull off this type of cake, it should be fine. Ultimatly, I agree with KoryAK once she takes it, it is up to her to get it home.

lainalee Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:04pm
post #5 of 26

ps, hope you post the pics.

lisa78332 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:04pm
post #6 of 26

I agree. Once it leaves your hands, you're done. If you were delivering it, then that would be another situation. Like the previous post, maybe make a flyer listing the do's and don'ts, such as,... avoid direct sunlight (cuz it'll melt), avoid braking (cuz it'll fall)....etc etc etc.... have her initial and give her a copy....

(i hadn't thought of this until now.....I think I may do this myself)

todolomio Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:11pm
post #7 of 26

When a customer refuses me to deliver a cake, I pull out a release form that says: The cake ordered by_____________was picked up on _________at _______am/pm by ________________. The person receiving the cake/s aknowledges that the cake was completed as per ordered by _______________and was given in perfect conditions.

I also have something like this disclaimer in the delivery part of my contract.

We (company name/your name) offer delivery service for an additional cost of _______ the client has chosen not to have this service provided therefor once the cake leaves our shop we can not take any responsibility for any cake damage occurred during transit.

Just do your best, dowel the cake properly take a good picture of the cake and wish her luck! Once it leaves your shop/house you can not control what happens to it!

solascakes Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:25pm
post #8 of 26

It happens all the time when people come to pick up their cakes and you want to die of hypertension cos you don't trust them.I have a pink and blue princess-like cake in my photos,the lady sent her husband to pick up and the cake looked nothing like in the pics when the cust. saw it,simply cos her husband mistakingly drove like a mad man crashed it. Well my consolation is that it's left my hand anyway.

solascakes Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:29pm
post #9 of 26

I mean the alternative is to start crying as i couldn't believe the customer did not see the cake in it's full glory.She saw my pics anyway.

KHalstead Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:47pm
post #10 of 26

What kind of stacking system are you using?? If it's just dowels and cardboard rounds that puppy is probably gonna crash! If it's like an sps system or something similar it should be ok, even if it's at a slight slant the whole time. I'm thinking maybe you want to take the mast out and have her re-insert it into the cake after delivery to ensure if the cake starts to lean that the weight of the mast doesn't rip through the cake causing extensive damage! I feel for you!! It's always like sending one of my children off with a stranger that I know doesn't love and care for them the way I do! lol sick, I know!!!!

LeanneW Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:47pm
post #11 of 26

I agree with PinkZiab, whats with the "shallow box" it should be in a full size box, big enough to close the flaps at the top.

You can get inexpensive shipping boxes at Target or Walmart that are 16 inches square and about 20 inches high, or even bigger. That would be best if she's going to strap it in. At least you won't have to worry about the seat belt slipping and hitting the cake.

good luck!

Postal_Cakemaker Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 5:50pm
post #12 of 26

The cake shop I worked in did the same thing as "Todolomio" did. The disclaimer saved her numerous times.

DON'T FORGET TO TAKE A PICTURE FROM ALL ANGLES!!!!

Please post the pics when you get the chance!! Would love to see it!!

Caralinc Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 6:14pm
post #13 of 26

I also agree, have them read and sign the disclaimer prior to taking the cake. You can recommend suggestions for how to transport a cake but cannot make them follow them. Maybe even include the recommendations in the disclaimer???

Caralinc Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 6:16pm
post #14 of 26

I also agree, have them read and sign the disclaimer prior to taking the cake. You can recommend suggestions for how to transport a cake but cannot make them follow them. Maybe even include the recommendations in the disclaimer???

CakesbyBecca Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 6:22pm
post #15 of 26

Ok. So now I have a question about the box. I was the one who told her a shallow box because this sucker is HEAVY and bulky and I can't imagine trying to get it in and out of a box without the whole thing crashing. How does that work?
The other thing is that I can't really do a release form because technically I don't have a business. I live in CA and make a few cakes here and there for donations only, since I can't legally charge anything. If the cake were for her, I wouldn't worry about it too much because like you say, once it's in her possession, I am no longer responsible for it, but the cake is for a co-worker of hers. My friend is picking it up because she was coming out here anyway.
The support system is dowels and cake boards only. She didn't order the cake until two weeks ago. No time to order SPS and I don't have SPS on hand because I don't make very many cakes.
Thanks for the advice. And you're right. Once it's in her hands, I am no longer responsible.

Caralinc Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 7:35pm
post #16 of 26

Okay; newbie question. What is a SPS System? I could not locate the acronym under the list of acroynms. Thanks in advance. icon_redface.gificon_smile.gif

tiggy2 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 7:45pm
post #17 of 26

SPS=single plate support system. There's a sticky at the top of the "How do I" forum about it.

sweetkake Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 7:50pm
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakesbyBecca

Ok. So now I have a question about the box. I was the one who told her a shallow box because this sucker is HEAVY and bulky and I can't imagine trying to get it in and out of a box without the whole thing crashing. How does that work?
The other thing is that I can't really do a release form because technically I don't have a business. I live in CA and make a few cakes here and there for donations only, since I can't legally charge anything. If the cake were for her, I wouldn't worry about it too much because like you say, once it's in her possession, I am no longer responsible for it, but the cake is for a co-worker of hers. My friend is picking it up because she was coming out here anyway.
The support system is dowels and cake boards only. She didn't order the cake until two weeks ago. No time to order SPS and I don't have SPS on hand because I don't make very many cakes.
Thanks for the advice. And you're right. Once it's in her hands, I am no longer responsible.


Hello, CakesbyBecca: I don't know if there is another way but what I do is flatten the box and place the finished cake on the bottom part, lift the sides and tape them. When I arrive at the venue, I untape and drop the sides to remove the cake.

Caralinc Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 7:59pm
post #19 of 26

Thanks tiggy2!!

Deb_ Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 8:37pm
post #20 of 26

I do what sweetcake does. If the box is tall just take a razor or sharp scissors and cut down 2 corners of the box, lay the side down flat, put a piece of "no slip carpet grip" on the bottom of the box and then place the cake on top. Bring up the side and tape it back together.

The carpet grip will keep the cake board in place so it won't slide around in the box and damage the cake.

Instruct them to cut the tape and lay down the side of the box to get the cake out.

I really hope this turns out OK for you. I think your friend is taking a very big chance driving that cake around for 1 1/2 hrs on the seat of her car, especially since it's not for her.

As others have said there isn't much you can do but give them good instructions......drive slow, easy on the corners, brake easy, keep out of the sun, put A/C on in the car to keep it cool, etc. Once it leaves your possession it's her responsibility to handle it with care.

Good luck!

CakesbyBecca Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 10:45pm
post #21 of 26

Thanks for the tip about the box. We'll try that.
This same friend asked me the other day how much of a tip I would accept for the cake because her friend was thinking about giving me $200 and she told her she thought that was too much so she wanted to know how much I would accept. I informed her nicely that this cake is a total of 108 servings, covered in fondant, with a slightly carved caked on top and candy melt accents. The cost of the materials alone has been about $70 and I've spent about 20 to 30 hrs on it. I told her that a low end bakery would charge about $350 for a cake like this and left it at that. No comment back from her on it.
I'm actually sick to my stomach that it will fall apart, but, like dh constantly reminds me, locus of control. This is beyond my control, so I shouldn't waste my energy worrying about it. I'll feel much better once Saturday has come and gone.

CakesbyBecca Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:51am
post #22 of 26

I finished it! It's the first picture in my photos (Kyle's Pirate Ship).
TFL!

CakesByLJ Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 12:45pm
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakesbyBecca

I finished it! It's the first picture in my photos (Kyle's Pirate Ship).
TFL!


[list=]

Great job on that cake~ Be sure to let us know how the delivery goes.... icon_smile.gif (keeping my fingers crossed)[/list]

KookieKris Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 12:55pm
post #24 of 26

Great cake! You really did a nice job! thumbs_up.gif

pianocat Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 2:04pm
post #25 of 26

Great job on the cake. Hope it travels well.

CakesbyBecca Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 4:04pm
post #26 of 26

Thank you so much for all your help and support. Here's the email I got back from my friend the day of the party:

You're cake was the fascination & awe of everyone at the party!!! It was so fun seeing the reactions, wish I could have had a video camera....you're a talent girlfriend!!!

YAY! No shipwreck on this one!

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