Question About Wires......

Decorating By SOULLA13 Updated 3 Apr 2009 , 4:27pm by PinkZiab

SOULLA13 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:54pm
post #1 of 19

Hi everyone, a quick question for all you experts out there, i will be maing my first cascading flowers cake next week. I have made my roses on wires and will be covering them in green floral tape, what i want to know is can i insert the covered wire straight into the cake to create the cascading flowers? Or do i need to attach the wires together and drape them on the cake and attach using royal icing? Im just worried about my flowers breaking if i fiddle with them too much. icon_sad.gif

18 replies
jammjenks Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 1:00pm
post #2 of 19

I wouldn't think that you could put floral tape directly into a cake. Maybe you could dip that end into white candy melts and after they're set, stick that into the cake. Just a thought.

SOULLA13 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 3:30pm
post #3 of 19

how should i go about doing it then without the dipping???

tinygoose Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 3:48pm
post #4 of 19

I have never been able to get a straight answer on this one either. The last few cakes I did that had flowers with wires I ended up inserting drinking straws into the cake, inserted the wires into the straws, and secured them with RI. Hope that helps, but I would love to know too.

aobodessa Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:16pm
post #5 of 19

I would recommend laying in a supply of barman's straws (the narrow ones), as they work well for this, too, without defacing too much of your cake. Then insert the wired flowers (either with or without floral tape), securing as necessary with a little royal icing.

Another option is to wrap the stems (with the floral tape on them already) with a little piece of plastic wrap. This will easily come out of the cake, and you shouldn't have any trouble with "allergic reactions". Just make sure the plastic wrap is in one piece, has no holes or "tails" hanging off it, and removes with the floral piece to avoid any choking hazard.

hth,

Odessa

SOULLA13 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:20pm
post #6 of 19

the problem is my customer has asked for a traditional fruit and i dont think straws will push through icon_sad.gif

aobodessa Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:32pm
post #7 of 19

One last suggestion that will likely work and I think we're all over-thinking the problem: purchase some florist's picks. The type with a rubber cap that holds water. Florists use these all the time to keep flowers fresh. You put the cap on the tube, insert your wired flowers through the top hole (doesn't matter if you have floral tape on them), and insert the pick into the cake. The pick has a pointed end (ostensibly for inserting into firm styrofoam), so you should have no problem with putting into a fruitcake or any other firmer surface.

(Can't believe I didn't put this recommendation in my original post here ... I use these all the time! Duh!)

good luck,

Odessa

PinkZiab Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:34pm
post #8 of 19

You can stick them right in the cake... it won't be a problem

Caralinc Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:50pm
post #9 of 19

Hi, I am a newbie; however, I have read in a few of my cake decorating books the best way to insert wire flowers into a cake is to use florist pics as aobodessa above mentions in her post. I have read many times that items should not be directly inserted into the cake. I imagine incase something breaks off. I will be doing my first in a few weeks also and plan to do it this way also. HTH

Good luck. Let us know how it works out.

Jenn2179 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:51pm
post #10 of 19

Do not stick them right into the cake. The wires and floral tape are no food safe. Also if there is anything acidic in the cake it can rust the wires.

Cakepro Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 3:36am
post #11 of 19

DO NOT stick wires, with or without floral tape, directly into cake. There are too many contaminants that could potentially poison the cake.

Use straws or FOOD SAFE flower spikes (Wilton sells these: http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E312C10-475A-BAC0-5D34A3D6D0BDDF27 ). Using plastic ones from the florist are NOT food safe and do NOT belong in cake!

I am actually appalled at some of the responses in this thread.

PinkZiab Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:06am
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Quote:

DO NOT stick wires, with or without floral tape, directly into cake. There are too many contaminants that could potentially poison the cake.




I guess someone should tell Ron Ben-Israel (who wraps his wires in floral tape before sticking them in the cake) that he's been doing it wrong.

Cakepro Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 5:54am
post #13 of 19

If RBI tells you to lick a live electric wire, would you do it? LOL

Seriously, if one "cake celebrity" does something, that makes it right?

Come on, now. You are smarter than that.

SOULLA13 Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 6:47am
post #14 of 19

ok thanks guys, i will go with the majority of you and go find the narrowist posy picks and use them and secure them with a little royal icing.

PinkZiab Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 1:12pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

If RBI tells you to lick a live electric wire, would you do it? LOL

Seriously, if one "cake celebrity" does something, that makes it right?

Come on, now. You are smarter than that.




Has nothing to do with him being a "cake celebrity" it has to do with what i learned directly from him (and several other seasoned instructors, who are amazing cake artists and pastry chefs but most of whom you have probably never heard of because they're not "tv famous," but are well-known and well-respected in the industry). Ron Ben-Israel got where he was LONG before food network made being a chef (or pastry chef) a fashionable thing, and he didn't do it by "poisoning" his clients. I'm not going to jump off a bridge under his instruction, but when it comes to cake, yes I'm going to listen to every word that man says, take notes, and commit it to memory, which is exactly what I did during each class I had with him. The floral tape (waxed crepe variety) I use is labeled "non-toxic" (just the same as luster dust, dragees and any number of other "non-edible" items that are used on cakes), so while it's not an EDIBLE items, it's not harmful. And when I use bare wires, they're stainless steel (wiped with vinegar for disinfectant beforehand) so they ARE food-safe.

But hey, to each, his own... I'll continue to stick my wires in anyway I see fit, and you all do the same. I haven't poisoned anyone yet... if I do, please feel free to testify against me in my trial.

*editing for my horrible typing

Jenn2179 Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 1:18pm
post #16 of 19

In my class last week with Ncholas Lodge he told us that there was a pastry chef who stuck the wires directly into the cake that had an acidic filling and the next day when they took the wires out to cut the cake they were all rusted from the acid in the filling.

aobodessa Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 1:47pm
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

If RBI tells you to lick a live electric wire, would you do it? LOL

Seriously, if one "cake celebrity" does something, that makes it right?

Come on, now. You are smarter than that.



Has nothing to do with him being a "cake celebrity" it has to do with what i learned directly from him (and several other seasoned instructors, who are amazing cake artists and pastry chefs but most of whom you have probably never heard of because they're not "tv famous," but are well-known and well-respected in the industry). Ron Ben-Israel got where he was LONG before food network made being a chef (or pastry chef) a fashionable thing, and he didn't do it by "poisoning" his clients. I'm not going to jump off a bridge under his instruction, but when it comes to cake, yes I'm going to listen to every word that man says, take notes, and commit it to memory, which is exactly what I did during each class I had with him.

But hey, to each, his own... I'll continue to stick my wires in anyway I see fit, and you all do the same. I haven't poisoned anyone yet... if I do, please feel free to testify against me in my trial.


I think we're getting a little "territorial" here, everyone. This thread (it occurs to me) is bringing out the "decorator claws" ... we've all got differing ideas about how things SHOULD be done, and many times I note that if someone else gets to where they're going in a different way, some of us believe that course to be "wrong" because it's not how "we" would get there.

I love CC, but, honestly, we've got to stop berating each other about how to do things! This site gives great advice to newcomers and old hands in the decorating business alike. I think we can all agree that no one wants to injure/harm/damage/poison a Client. Some of us stick solely to what we were taught (either in a class, on tv, here, from a book, or by a friend) and believe other methods are totally and completely wrong. I say they're just different. I mean, how many of us would have ever thought of putting wires into our cakes when we first started into the decorating business? Horrors!!!

If we all take a trip from point A to point B, we may not all drive the same route. Some of us want to see the side roads and enjoy the travel, while others want only to get between the two as quickly as possible. Obviously, we have differing opinions about whether or not "food safe" is the ONLY way to go here. The best way, of course.

That having been said, do I believe wires should be put DIRECTLY into a cake? Not really. However, I believe that we all strive to be the best practicians of our art as we are able. Not all of us live in big cities where we have access to tons of gadgets or the latest and greatest decorating tools within a few minutes. We "make do" with what we have, striving to be as conscious of the laws and health concerns as we possibly can, for the sake of our Clients and, subsequently, our business/hobby. Will plastic florist picks work in this instance? Of course they will. I believe the prudent decorator would first wash them thoroughly (as one would when opening a package from Wilton) before chosing to use them, and would likely only put them into the cake as late in the game as possible. Will everyone take that course? No. But not everyone will have access to a "food safe" alternative in a quick fashion.

This can all be alleviated by planning ahead, of course (especially if you live in an area where you must order your supplies and have them shipped in ahead of time), but when a customer calls for a cake with just a couple of days notice, do you turn her away or do your best to provide what she asks with what you can access quickly?

It's a struggle we all must face, but can we please agree that we should just stop with the arguing already? Honestly, have refereed my share of arguments in my own home. I'd prefer not to have to get caught up in them here. So can we just agree to pass on alternatives, ideas and suggestions without the venom "kicker"?

Odessa

Cakepro Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:09pm
post #18 of 19

Odessa, as adults, we are allowed to disagree and debate and get a little riled if we choose to. Lectures from other adults are really not needed and in some cases can be seen as quite patronizing. Please save the 6-paragraph "can't we all just get along" speeches for your kiddos and let the big people talk it out. It's okay, really. I promise, it will be okay. We're big girls and can handle a little disagreement. icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

Hey pinkziab, can you tell me where you get SS floral wire? I would love to get some.

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

PinkZiab Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 4:27pm
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Odessa, as adults, we are allowed to disagree and debate and get a little riled if we choose to. Lectures from other adults are really not needed and in some cases can be seen as quite patronizing. Please save the 6-paragraph "can't we all just get along" speeches for your kiddos and let the big people talk it out. It's okay, really. I promise, it will be okay. We're big girls and can handle a little disagreement. icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

Hey pinkziab, can you tell me where you get SS floral wire? I would love to get some.

Thanks! icon_smile.gif




lol Amen... we're all big girls here icon_smile.gif

The stainless steel wire I use isn't, technically "floral" wire, I just get stainless steel industrial wire at the hardware/home improvement store. The finer gauges are harder to find, but they're out there icon_wink.gif

Downside is, it usually comes in spools, so you need to fight with it a little to straight it out, if that's the look you need, but when I'm working in shorter lengths, I don't find it to be a problem, especially if it's off of a larger spool. But when I want the look of bare wire without any covering, it works perfectly.

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