Smbc Under Fondant Questions

Decorating By MJoycake Updated 4 Apr 2009 , 1:14pm by cylstrial

MJoycake Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 1:34pm
post #1 of 9

I'm making a large stacked and carved Alice in Wonderland themed cake for my daughter and niece's combined birthday party. The different layers will be covered in fondant and I'm wondering about using SMBC under the fondant. I only started caking last year and only discovered SMBC in the last few months. I prefer the flavor of SMBC over icing sugar/butter buttercream, but I was under the impression that you had to refrigerate SMBC. I have to put together the cake the day before the party, so it will be sitting out probably 12-24 hours before it gets eaten. I would plan to use pasturized eggs in the SMBC.

Do any of you have experience or advice on this? Do you ice the cake with SMBC, then refrigerate it to get it to harden up before applying the fondant? And then are you using piping gel to get the fondant to stick to the hardened SMBC? After applying the fondant, is the cake ok to sit out, or does it have to be refigerated??

Thanks in advance!

8 replies
all4cake Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 1:51pm
post #2 of 9

I didn't use any piping gel...the warmth of your hands as you manipulate and smooth the fondant warms the icing a bit causing the fondant to stick adequately.

This is what I did when I had to travel a good distance with a cake...

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1331934

PinkZiab Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 2:35pm
post #3 of 9

I refrigerate the cake with SMBC until completely firm. You do not have to put anything on the SMBC to make the fondant stick. As the above poster said, just smooth the fondant with your hand and it will stick. I refrigerate my cakes once they are covered with fondant as well. Either way, be sure the cake sits out at room temp for a few hours before serving so the SMBC has time to soften.

cylstrial Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 3:38pm
post #4 of 9

So you can use pasteurized eggs in SMBC? I've been wondering about that. And it still tastes good?

And PinkZiab -- do you put saran wrap over your fondant cakes when they are in the fridge?

Thanks!

drakegore Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 7:56pm
post #5 of 9

hi!

smbc is my frosting of choice, not just because it tastes really (REALLY) good, but it is the meringue buttercream that does not require pastuerized eggs to be safe...as long as you get the eggs and sugar heated to 160 degrees before whipping. you do not have to worry about cooking the eggs because the sugar prevents that.

most of the pastuerized eggs come with disclaimers that they will not whip, but i have read on this site that some posters have had success with getting them to whip. i don't have any personal experience with the pastuerized eggs, i just use real ones and my trusty thermometer icon_smile.gif

PinkZiab Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 8:06pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

And PinkZiab -- do you put saran wrap over your fondant cakes when they are in the fridge?

Thanks!




No I just place them in as-is, no covering at all. When the weather is VERY hot and humid I make sure to have the AC CRANKING before I take the cakes out of the fridge. Of course if I was putting them in a home fridge with other foods and things that might give off an odor or otherwise leak onto the cake, then yeah I'd probably cover them.

soygurl Posted 3 Apr 2009 , 11:01pm
post #7 of 9

SMBC does NOT need to be refridgereated. Well, I guess you wouldn't want to leave it at room temp for weeks or anything, but it's totally fine at room temp for several days!

Before covering cakes in fondant (I almost always use SMBC under fondant), I like to freeze the cake for an hour or two so the SMBC is REALLY hard and cold. It makes it easier to smooth the fondant IME.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 5:30am
post #8 of 9

no matter how hard i get the SMBC when i cover it with fondant the fondant starts to get wet from the coldness of the SMBC and starts sticking to my hands and I can no longer smooth it icon_sad.gif but i live in a country with 70% to 80% humidity at any given time doesn't really help. unless i get AC in the kitchen icon_sad.gif

cylstrial Posted 4 Apr 2009 , 1:14pm
post #9 of 9

Drake and Pink -- Thanks for the info! I appreciate it.

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