cocobean Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 4:16am
post #1 of

I know this has been discussed before but I need to hear some of the arguments again. Should I feel good about putting one layer of filling between the two 2" high cakes. I really dread torting the cakes but I do like three layers of filling in one tier. icon_confused.gif

34 replies
SugarFrosted Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 5:03am
post #2 of

3 for me. Better frosting/filling to cake ratio. More yumminess!

patticakesnc Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 5:15am
post #3 of

Yep 3 for me too. Tort and fill! The only time I don't do that is when people don't like a lot of fillings or frostings.

CakeDiva73 Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 6:24am
post #4 of

3 for me too! icon_smile.gif

I think if you're having trouble justifying, just remember you can check better to see the cake is cooked all the way thru as well as brushing the layers with simple syrup if you're worried about it being dry.

I hate, hate, hated torting until my husband got me the agbay, but even before, I just did it by hand and tried to muttle thru.

sweetiesbykim Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 3:38am
post #5 of

I just recently made a from scratch cake and very successfully torted with great results! Cut three shallow cakes in half, so 6 layers of cake, 5 thin layers of frosting/filling. I couldn't believe how stable it was! It set so quickly in the fridge (I use real butter BC), and came out perfectly level! They looked kind of like stacked pancakes with BC in between.
Then I did a carrot cake with crushed pineapple, and it wouldn't be possible with that cake to torte 1/2-3/4" layers, for me anyway. My success was helped by using a butter-based, from scratch cake recipe, and freezing cakes for 12 hours before torting (thawed slightly so I could cut through!).

Otherwise, three cake layers, 2 layers of filling, vanilla BC on the outside, regardless of filling (except for chocolate BC).

Jannie92869 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 10:08am
post #6 of

A lot of previous posters stated they get 3 layers out of the two 2 inch cake rounds. Help me out here...I am trying to visualize...when I tort the two rounds I end up with 4 layers of cake not 3 with 3 layers of filling. I am probably missing the point.
Thanks

Mommy_Cakes Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 10:22am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jannie92869

I am trying to visualize...




Hold four fingers up sideways (like layers of a cake), now look at the space between your fingers. You only have 3 spaces to put filling in.


Hope that's the visual you were trying for other wise I feel silly walking walking around with icing between my fingers.

FromScratch Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 10:23am
post #8 of

You fill one of the pans normally and fill the other one so you have a short layer... you level and torte the big one and only level the short one and you have 3 layers of cake... it too much extra work for me. You have to take the shorter cake out sooner and disturb the larger one. I like the look of 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of filling. If you want to do 3 layers of cake then get the 3" pans... torte it into three 1" layers and fill. MUCH easier than messing with the 2" pans that way.

FromScratch Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 10:25am
post #9 of

Also.. get an agbay (oh how I long for one to call my own) and you will be able to torte any kind of cake including carrot with chunks of whatever you want in there... even nuts so I have been told.

Bluehue Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 10:26am

4 inche high cake - i always do 3 layers - as mentioned above - it is a much better cake to filling ratio.

Plus it looks far better when cut and served.
(well it does have to look good as well as taste good icon_wink.gif )

Can you pop the cake in the freezer for a bit - that way torting it will be much easier.

Bh. icon_smile.gif

Sabz Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mommy_Cakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jannie92869

I am trying to visualize...



Hold four fingers up sideways (like layers of a cake), now look at the space between your fingers. You only have 3 spaces to put filling in.


Hope that's the visual you were trying for other wise I feel silly walking walking around with icing between my fingers.





Thanks! That helped me too, I was starting to worry about my maths! icon_biggrin.gif

jammjenks Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:45pm

Oh man...I'm going against the grain here I guess. I bake two layers that are 2" high each. Level them and put one layer of filling or buttercream between. I NEVER torte and fill unless asked and so far I haven't been asked. Most of my customers don't even order fillings so it is just icing between the layers for me.

bethola Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:45pm

Well, guess I'm the Lone Ranger here today. I don't torte and have never had any complaints. To my knowledge in my area the cake decorators that I know don't torte either. I think you should do what makes you comfortable.

Beth in KY

KHalstead Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:54pm

I always torte all of my 4" high cakes with the exception of my topsy turvy cakes and double layered sheetcakes, unless they specifically ask for it, in which case I call it a "kitchen cake" and charge a little more.
I don't do it necessarily for the frosting/cake ratio as much as for the way it looks when it's cut and served, I just think it looks nicer.

artscallion Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethola

Well, guess I'm the Lone Ranger here today. I don't torte and have never had any complaints. To my knowledge in my area the cake decorators that I know don't torte either. I think you should do what makes you comfortable.

Beth in KY




I bet it is a regional thing. I've always torted my cakes for the simple reason that I've never been served a cake here that wasn't torted. So it never even occurred to me to do it any other way. Plus I think the look is better. especially when it's a contrasting filling, like raspberry in a white cake.

Sabz Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 1:03pm

I bake in 2" pans, and my cakes always end up 1 1/2" high. Is there anyway I can make them rise higher?

Wow, an Agbay sounds like a must. I use the Wilton-type leveller... icon_confused.gif

jammjenks Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 1:42pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabz

I bake in 2" pans, and my cakes always end up 1 1/2" high. Is there anyway I can make them rise higher?

Wow, an Agbay sounds like a must. I use the Wilton-type leveller... icon_confused.gif




Fill them at least 2/3 full and they'll rise taller than the pan. Then you can just use the top of the pan as a guide to level. It takes more batter to do it this way, but it is worth it.

cocobean Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 3:09pm

Thanks all for your imput. I guess I will continue to torte so I have three layers of filling in a 4" high tier. I did buy me a 14" serated knife, I think Wilton makes it, can't remember. Anyway it's REALLY sharp which is great. I guess sometimes you just start second guessing yourself or want to skip a step cause you're not sure it really matters. But I guess in the long run that is what I prefer to see. icon_rolleyes.gif

Justbeck101 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 3:25pm

I do 3 layers filling in wedding cakes and 1 in special occasion cakes

BakingGirl Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 3:29pm

Just a little tip to those of you who are a bit torte-phobic. An easy way of doing it is to put your cake on a turn table. Put a knife against the side of the cake where you want to make the cut. Spin the turn table while holding the knife in the same spot until you have scored a groove all the way around. (Spinning while holding knife steady means you will get a perfectly level score.) Then wrap a length of sewing thread (or dental floss) around the cake in the groove, cross the ends and pull through the cake. Voila - perfectly level cake layers.

One word of warning, this does not work terribly well if you have a cake full of hard bits like nuts or chocolate chips, they tend to pull and tear. But for a regular cake this works really well.

KoryAK Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 4:55pm

I torte everything. 4 cake and 3 filling layers in a 4" tall cake.

KHalstead Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 1:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justbeck101

I do 3 layers filling in wedding cakes and 1 in special occasion cakes




I think that's what I'm gonna start doing...I hate to torte, but I know it looks nicer when cut....this is such a great idea!

FromScratch Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 1:52pm

I think I'm going to start doing that to... I think doing that and I can charge a little less I will be able to land more birthdays and it'll be easier. icon_lol.gif

costumeczar Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 1:52pm

I offer both and do what the customer wants me to do! icon_smile.gif

dailey Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:00pm

all my cakes are 4 layers with 3 layers of filling.

the bottom line is presentation. no one is gonna complain if you don't torte but they will "definitely" remember your cakes if you do...

leah_s Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:00pm

I torte every cake. 4 layers of cake + 3 layers of filling. It's one of the things that sets me apart from bakeries. Also customers always love the look of the slice in the plate - and remember me.

And with an Agbay it is soooooooo easy to torte. You need an Agbay.

BakingGirl Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:10pm

Personally I think the filling is the best, so an unfilled cake to me is more like a coffee cake or tea bread. Got to have filling for a celebration cake!

Justbeck101 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 2:52pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justbeck101

I do 3 layers filling in wedding cakes and 1 in special occasion cakes



I think that's what I'm gonna start doing...I hate to torte, but I know it looks nicer when cut....this is such a great idea!




One of the reasons I do this is because it cuts down on questions of "WHY" the wedding cake costs more then the birthday cake. That is part of my answer.

leah_s Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 3:30pm

I have an even better answer for why wedding cakes cost more than birthday cakes.

They don't.

I charge by the serving. Period.

I charge an equipment fee for any tiered cake, to cover SPS.

However, I do use the Wilton Wedding Cake Chart for wedding cakes, and the Wilton Party Cake Chart for party cakes, so the customer does get an slightly bigger cake for a party.

Justbeck101 Posted 5 Apr 2009 , 8:22pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I have an even better answer for why wedding cakes cost more than birthday cakes.

They don't.

I charge by the serving. Period.

I charge an equipment fee for any tiered cake, to cover SPS.

However, I do use the Wilton Wedding Cake Chart for wedding cakes, and the Wilton Party Cake Chart for party cakes, so the customer does get an slightly bigger cake for a party.




That may be true for you, but not for me.

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