Height Of A Cake Pls Help

Decorating By sugarrose Updated 31 Mar 2009 , 11:52pm by KoryAK

sugarrose Posted 29 Mar 2009 , 10:32am
post #1 of 15

i want to do a 5 tier cake, stacked on top of each other.what is the heighest possible level that i can make a one layer, i want to make it every layer high as possible.for example 8 inches. never done before.
Is it possible , and when how do i support it from the bottom?
grateful for some ideas or tutorials.

14 replies
Redlotusninjagrl Posted 29 Mar 2009 , 2:53pm
post #2 of 15

Are you talking about 8" for each tier or total? I remember a thread on this but don't remember the answer. I think 6" was the largest height for a tier in most cases, but I am probably wrong about that. I think there was an issue finding plates large enough for something bigger than 6". I hope someone else jumps in though, as I don't really know. So if I didn't help, hopefully someone else will see this and step in. Good luck!

indydebi Posted 29 Mar 2009 , 3:23pm
post #3 of 15

If you do you 8" tall tiers, you would make a 4" tier with dowels inside, then place another 4" tall cake of the same size on top of that. This second 4" tall tier is sitting on a cake cardboard and/or plate. Make sure sides are flush and ice the whole thing. When it's cut, the 8" tier is "cut in half" height-wise .... you now have two 4" tall cakes to cut.

If you try to make one 8" tall tier, one of the first problems is going to be "what size plate are you going to put that big honkin' piece of cake on? icon_confused.gif It won't fit on a standard 6" dessert plate. icon_lol.gif

Bluehue Posted 30 Mar 2009 , 4:07am
post #4 of 15

Blue picks herself up off the floor from laughing - sorry i was just passing through and thought i would read this thread - then i came across these two lines -

If you try to make one 8" tall tier, one of the first problems is going to be "what size plate are you going to put that big honkin' piece of cake on?

Oh Indy you are hilarious - and make me laugh so often - i love your style of saying *it* as *it* is.......the only way to be in my book.

Rightio back to the thread - (wipes laughing tear from left eye)

sugarrose as Indy explained - otherwise everybody is going to end up with a HUGE slab of cake on a HUGE plate.
I would cut the 8" cake in half horizontially and then tort each 4" layer - otherwise thats a lot of cake with no filling for people to get through.

What type of cake are you thinking of making ?
And please post some pics when completed - thumbs_up.gif

Bh icon_smile.gif

sugarrose Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 6:55am
post #5 of 15

thankyou for all the good tips. Its correct 8 inch piece of cake , i wonder too how it cxould be served. good tip. i got this from a customer who wanted it so high. But as said it is also a good idea to put the cakes on cake boards and cover it fully , which i think the best way to do it. what ever cake i make i will do several fillings on them.
with all this i came to the conclution to advice the customer to be satisfied withe a 6 inch cake , where she can serve it properly on a normal plate.
what is the normal height what you take when people want it high as possible.?
thanks again. it was a big help.

sugarrose Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 7:00am
post #6 of 15

i am thinking of making chocolate cake, lemon cake,orange cake with different fillings.i t has to be 4 tiers including a dummy (big) at the bottom.

Cakepro Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 7:36am
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarrose


what is the normal height what you take when people want it high as possible.?




There is no "normal" height when people want it as high as possible, because you can make it as tall as you want it.

If you want a super-tall cake, you just build cakes upon cakes, all the same size, on cardboard cake circles, with proper structural support inside as previously described and cover the whole tall cake in buttercream (and fondant, if desired).

You can make an eight foot tall, eight inch round cake if you really wanted to.

sugarrose Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 9:34pm
post #8 of 15

thankyou for all the important tips. when i have done it i will send a message.i hope it works as i plan it.

dandelion56602 Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 9:50pm
post #9 of 15

Just remember your internal supports!!!! If you don't use a board between 2 4" high cakes (for an 8" high cake) it will sink & collapse. And remember to have a strong base & some strong man to help you carry it. (as much as I hate to say it, women just aren't as strong) and that baby will be heavy

KoryAK Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 9:59pm
post #10 of 15

I still do the inner board thing with 6" cakes. 5" is as high as I go without. I feel that it's needed for support not just the plating aspect. 5 tiers 6-8" tall is going to be one heavy-ass cake!

KoryAK Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 10:03pm
post #11 of 15

I still do the inner board thing with 6" cakes. 5" is as high as I go without. I feel that it's needed for support not just the plating aspect. 5 tiers 6-8" tall is going to be one heavy-ass cake!

dandelion56602 Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 10:10pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

I still do the inner board thing with 6" cakes. 5" is as high as I go without. I feel that it's needed for support not just the plating aspect. 5 tiers 6-8" tall is going to be one heavy-ass cake!




My thoughts exactly! When I did a 12, 9 & 6 each 4" tall my dh estimated about 30 lbs.

I'm interested to know how you would go about plating if your layers are 2", which would give me 3 layers. Would you torte the middle tier or torte all layers & have 6 1" layers and plate after 3 cake layers & 2 layers of filling?

tonedna Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 10:41pm
post #13 of 15

I would put a plate in every 4 inches of cakes, for safety..
Is this what we are talking about?
LL

KoryAK Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 11:06pm
post #14 of 15

I still do the inner board thing with 6" cakes. 5" is as high as I go without. I feel that it's needed for support not just the plating aspect. 5 tiers 6-8" tall is going to be one heavy-ass cake!

KoryAK Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 11:52pm
post #15 of 15

sorry for the extra posting...

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