How To Make A Cake Lighter?

Decorating By blueberrycheesecake Updated 29 Mar 2009 , 7:29am by blueberrycheesecake

blueberrycheesecake Posted 28 Mar 2009 , 5:00am
post #1 of 3

Hello, CC users!

I am posting another question. It seems that I am learning a lot for this month because of the orders I get.

One of my customers, loved my cake but she had a comment that made me a bit conscious about my cake.

She said that my cake was heavy (literally. It was also heavy in the stomach. It's supposed to be dessert so it has to be lighter. Is there an ingredient I can add to my cake to make it a bit lighter?

How about you, guys? Are your cakes heavy to carry? My cake is just the usual round cake using a 10x10 pan, so it's not too big.

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2 replies
JanH Posted 28 Mar 2009 , 9:36am
post #2 of 3

Except for the foam cakes, i.e., angel or chiffon, sponge - cake is pretty heavy. Tiered/stacked wedding cakes can weigh a lot and take several people to carry....

However, if what your customer was really saying was that your cake had a bread-like quality then your either not measuring your flour correctly or you're overmixing (which develops the gluten).

Are you making mix, doctored mix or scratch recipes?

If making a mix, sift dry ingredients (don't try to beat out any lumps).

When mixing, use the lowest speed on stand mixer or medium speed on hand mixer, and mix no longer than the directions recommend.

When measuring flour... Aerate the flour, then spoon gently into a measuring cup, level with knife drawn across top of measuring cup.

Don't draw the measuring cup through the flour and shake to level - this will give an inaccurate measurement.

Sifting is either done before or after measuring, depending on the recipe. (If recipe doesn't mention sifting... measure first, then sift to remove any lumps.)

When it comes to mixing, MORE is definitely not BETTER. Overmixing can cause any number of faults in the finished cakes. icon_sad.gif

Handy cake troubleshooting charts:

http://tinyurl.com/2p5bdu

http://tinyurl.com/6c745g

http://tinyurl.com/32goqe

http://tinyurl/com/6lpjww

A very nice site with scratch baking help and info on the science of baking:

www.joyofbaking.com

HTH

blueberrycheesecake Posted 29 Mar 2009 , 7:29am
post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Except for the foam cakes, i.e., angel or chiffon, sponge - cake is pretty heavy. Tiered/stacked wedding cakes can weigh a lot and take several people to carry....

However, if what your customer was really saying was that your cake had a bread-like quality then your either not measuring your flour correctly or you're overmixing (which develops the gluten).

Are you making mix, doctored mix or scratch recipes?

If making a mix, sift dry ingredients (don't try to beat out any lumps).

When mixing, use the lowest speed on stand mixer or medium speed on hand mixer, and mix no longer than the directions recommend.

When measuring flour... Aerate the flour, then spoon gently into a measuring cup, level with knife drawn across top of measuring cup.

Don't draw the measuring cup through the flour and shake to level - this will give an inaccurate measurement.

Sifting is either done before or after measuring, depending on the recipe. (If recipe doesn't mention sifting... measure first, then sift to remove any lumps.)

When it comes to mixing, MORE is definitely not BETTER. Overmixing can cause any number of faults in the finished cakes. icon_sad.gif

Handy cake troubleshooting charts:

http://tinyurl.com/2p5bdu

http://tinyurl.com/6c745g

http://tinyurl.com/32goqe

http://tinyurl/com/6lpjww

A very nice site with scratch baking help and info on the science of baking:

www.joyofbaking.com

HTH


thanks, JanH!

i will remember this steps. icon_smile.gif

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