What Design Do You Suggest?

Decorating By kellertur Updated 27 Mar 2009 , 1:00am by i_heart_pastry

kellertur Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 6:34pm
post #1 of 12

My DH has asked me to donate a cake to their office party tomorrow (50-75 ppl), and everyone wants my vegan PB cup Cake.
My question is ~ I usually do a PB cake then fill and frost with choc mousse Buttercream. SO, if I cover this cake in fondant will it loose it's PB cup flavor? (dumb question?)
75% of my business comes from his office...so I really want to WOW them with a cool design.

I have no idea what to do... I thought about doing something springy, but I DON'T want to do an Easter theme though ~ as there are people of all faiths and cultures at his office. I'd like to keep it neutral. I first thought about doing a topsy turvy, but have overwhelmed myself once again looking through CC's amazing gallery.

Thank you ~ I didn't intend to ramble... icon_redface.gif

11 replies
janelwaters Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 6:39pm
post #2 of 12

you could do the pb cup cake and cover it in chocolate fondant to keep the flavor, then you could decorate the outside like a flower pot and have gumpaste/fondant flowers "planted" in the cake - so it would be spring, but not easter and with the chocolate fondant you get the "dirt" and the flavor.

kellertur Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 10:34pm
post #3 of 12

It's for tomorrow morning... do you think I can make the flowers tonight and they will dry in time? He gets up at 3am, so I'll have to put it together before I go to bed around midnight or so... (I am so tired icon_cry.gif )

I really want to use the flowers ~ which would you make? I've wanted to make an orchid or lily, but it says to let them dry "overnight" after the FIRST step. Is there anyway around this? icon_confused.gif

mommyle Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 10:40pm
post #4 of 12

You could make the flowers out of Chocolate melts. Kind of like an outline of a flower that a kid might make... I know I'm not describing it right. Gosh. But with chocolate it means that it doesn't have to take as much time to set.

leah_s Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 10:42pm
post #5 of 12

Generally speaking, flowers take days to dry unless you're really fast and can work in gumpaste with extra Tylose. But you have to be both good and fast.

And that's why I always keep some basic purchased flowers in the closet. Just pull them out, air brush them and I'm good to go.

I once looked at an order because I just had a nagging feeling that I'd forgotten something. Yep, I'd forgotten 9 gumpaste roses. Pulled them out, air brushed them, and left the house 15 minutes later to deliver.

jimandmollie Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 11:09pm
post #6 of 12

Hello, I am new around here but I thought I might offer this suggestion...

I love the flower pot idea and thought that maybe since you don't have enough time to dry them you could do a quick trip to the store and get some real flowers? I know most florists can put them in those individual pointed things that you could maybe stick down into the cake? Just a thought. Good luck with this and I look forward to seeing a pic when you are done.

kellertur Posted 26 Mar 2009 , 12:10am
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimandmollie

Hello, I am new around here but I thought I might offer this suggestion...
I love the flower pot idea and thought that maybe since you don't have enough time to dry them you could do a quick trip to the store and get some real flowers? I know most florists can put them in those individual pointed things that you could maybe stick down into the cake? Just a thought. Good luck with this and I look forward to seeing a pic when you are done.




I would LOVE to use fresh flowers, BUT in Maine we really can't anymore. The Health Inspector gave me a form stating that we cannot use them anymore due pesticides and that even flowers marked organic can have trace amounts of poisons, etc. so I've been too scared to even try. If we do use them, we have to have "in writing" that they are certified organic with no pesticides. (sorry, if that is a bit wordy...) It just feels like too much of a liability... but I'm very "by the book" about my license. Otherwise, it was a GREAT idea and thanks for the suggestion. icon_smile.gif

i_heart_pastry Posted 26 Mar 2009 , 12:26am
post #8 of 12

You could do the quilling style of flowers, like in my avatar only flat on the cake (since there wouldn't be enough drying time). I've seen several cakes in the gallery that have the flat ones and they look great. Someone did one with a chocolate fondant covered cake - I think the flowers were light blue along with some other colors. I remember it was quite beautiful. Good luck!

Bec

kellertur Posted 26 Mar 2009 , 6:30pm
post #9 of 12

Thanks everyone. Your suggestions were very helpful. I decided not to do flowers, just used the ejector set. It was getting late and I was up until 2am.

I posted the cake here to make it easier to view, although it's not that great... Someday, I'd love to know how everyone is getting such sharp edges with fondant... Why do these things escape me? icon_rolleyes.gif

I_heart_pastry~ Is quilling difficult to learn? That is a really pretty effect. I think I saw it in one of my books, I just can't remember which one? Maybe Colette's or Maisie Fantasie? I'll look. icon_smile.gif
LL

janelwaters Posted 26 Mar 2009 , 9:17pm
post #10 of 12

Very cute and Very sping!!

you should invest in Sugarshack's DVD Flawless Fondant - I just got all of her DVDs - they are AMAZING and she shows how to get that super sharp edge!

kellertur Posted 26 Mar 2009 , 10:49pm
post #11 of 12

Great idea! My husband actually asked me tonight if there was anything I needed on Amazon.com (free shipping over $25), but I'm going to buy her DVDs instead. icon_smile.gif Thanks for the tip.

i_heart_pastry Posted 27 Mar 2009 , 1:00am
post #12 of 12

Your cake came out great - can't believe how quickly you did it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by K2cakes



I_heart_pastry~ Is quilling difficult to learn? That is a really pretty effect. I think I saw it in one of my books, I just can't remember which one? Maybe Colette's or Maisie Fantasie? I'll look. icon_smile.gif




I first saw this technique on one of Colette's cakes. It's very easy. I just used the clay gun to get the noodle shapes, cut them to equal lengths for each petal, shape and stick together with a little water. On the avatar cake, I used a few different discs for the different effects. For the ones that are standing up, I just made the flowers in advance to let them harden. Easy-peasy.

Bec

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