Stacking Questions For Two Tiered Cake

Decorating By Pebbles1727 Updated 26 Mar 2009 , 1:44am by Pebbles1727

Pebbles1727 Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 3:13pm
post #1 of 15

Hi Everyone,
I'm about to try my first stacked cake and got few questions. I looked through the forums and seem a little confused with all info posted. I think I got the general idea though, but some specifics escape me. If someone can please answer these questions, I'd greatly appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

1. When stacking two tiered cake, what is the better shape: 10 and 6, 9 and 6, or 8 and 6?

2. The board circle (wilton) that 6 inch cake is sitting on...does it need to be wrapped with something to prevent it from getting greasy?

3. Is the middle wooden dowel, going through both tiers, necessary for 2 tier cakes or does that apply more to larger number of tiers?

4. What kind of cutting guide do you provide with your two tier cakes? I'm just confused with the logistics of digging the dowels out of cake and icing, sounds messy.

Thanks again, P

14 replies
dberck Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 3:23pm
post #2 of 15

I'm looking for answers about the same thing...

Do I leave the cardboard under the 6 inch when I place it on the 8?

Is the process the same when stacking on fondant?

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 3:41pm
post #3 of 15

Good questions - Here goes...Hopefully this makes sense!


1. When stacking two tiered cake, what is the better shape: 10 and 6, 9 and 6, or 8 and 6? I think it really depends on the number of servings you need as well as the look you are going for. Per the Wilton Chart, which is what I use, the 6" & 8" will serve 36 people but it leaves a "lip" of only 1". The 6" & 9" will serve 44 but leaves a lip of about 1.5" so there's a little more room between the layers. The 6" & 10" combo will serve 50 and leaves about 2" between the layers so you have a little more decorating room.

2. The board circle (wilton) that 6 inch cake is sitting on...does it need to be wrapped with something to prevent it from getting greasy? I do not wrap my boards between the layers but a lot of people on this site do and swear by it. I don't think it's a bad idea I just don't like to do it so I haven't. I think it's a good idea for larger cakes. The theory is that the grease will soak through the board and make it less sturdy which put the stability of your cake in jeopardy. My tiered cakes are filled, iced & decorated on either the day before the cake is due or the day of depending on my schedule and the amount of decorating time needed.

3. Is the middle wooden dowel, going through both tiers, necessary for 2 tier cakes or does that apply more to larger number of tiers? I wouldn't personally put a dowel through the middle of a 2-tier cake. In fact, I never use a center dowel unless the cake is 4-tiers or more. This is probably not necessary but it gives me peace of mind considering I delivery all my cakes completely stacked & decorated.

4. What kind of cutting guide do you provide with your two tier cakes? I'm just confused with the logistics of digging the dowels out of cake and icing, sounds messy. When I meet with my brides I find out where the reception is being held and who is cutting the cake. If a caterer is cutting the cake, chances are they already know exactly how to cut the cake appropriately. If there is a family member or a venue that doesn't do a lot of Wedding Cakes I will provide the cutting guide that Wilton uses. There are other cutting guides out there that are different so figure out which chart you will be using for your serving guides and then use the appropriate cutting guide with it.

Hope that helps and Good Luck to you!

Tammi[/b]

patticakesnc Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 3:41pm
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

Hi Everyone,
I'm about to try my first stacked cake and got few questions. I looked through the forums and seem a little confused with all info posted. I think I got the general idea though, but some specifics escape me. If someone can please answer these questions, I'd greatly appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

1. When stacking two tiered cake, what is the better shape: 10 and 6, 9 and 6, or 8 and 6?

2. The board circle (wilton) that 6 inch cake is sitting on...does it need to be wrapped with something to prevent it from getting greasy?

3. Is the middle wooden dowel, going through both tiers, necessary for 2 tier cakes or does that apply more to larger number of tiers?

4. What kind of cutting guide do you provide with your two tier cakes? I'm just confused with the logistics of digging the dowels out of cake and icing, sounds messy.

Thanks again, P




I like the look of a 10 6 better. It gives a larger ledge, but it also depends on your taste and how many servings you want.

I wrap my board for the top tier (or any tier other than the bottom tier) in plastic wrap or I like press and seal.

I do put a center down all the way down on a 2 tier if I am transporting it stacked. Not if I am assembling it on site.

I supply a normal cutting guide for each tier. If you use the SPS system rather than wooden dowls you don't have to worry about digging out dowls.

Pebbles1727 Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 5:06pm
post #5 of 15

Thanks you all, this is very helpful. I did not realize that 10 and 6 will serve that many. That sounds like a much bigger cake than what I was imagining. Will 8 and 4 or 5 be a good combination or will it look funny? Also, if I am to put the center dowel in, will the part of the board and plastic wrap gets mushed into the bottom tear in the spot where the dowel goes through?
Thanks, P

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 5:11pm
post #6 of 15

You should definitely sharpen the end of the dowel to a point so that it will go through easily. Give it a little tap with a hammer and it will go right through the cake board with no problem...

patticakesnc Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 5:19pm
post #7 of 15

yes, sharpen it. I keep an electric pencil sharpener in my kitchen just for that so that we don't transfer any lead into my cake from the office pencil sharpener.

icer101 Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 5:26pm
post #8 of 15

definetly , use a center dowel, if you are traveling with it stacked. even for 2 tiers. it is not that messy.. also there is the single plate system... i like to use earlenes moores cutting guide.. indydebi's is also like that best i can remember.. you can go on her site too. and see. you will love these two methods.. yes, be sure to sharpen the end of the dowel going thru all cake tiers.. you measure the dowel up against the two tiers.. cut about 3/4--1" below top of top tier.. and then hammer in gently.. hth these dowels come from the wilton section at michaels,etc... they will be fine for your 2 tier cake.

sgauta Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 6:01pm
post #9 of 15

I also don't wrap my boards in anything and haven't had a problem, and I use a center dowel if I'm transporting it stacked. Like everyone else has said, just sharpen the end and gently hammer it through. I do a lot of two-tiered cakes and I also like the 6" & 10" sizes for the bigger 'lip.' The cutting guides are for pretty small pieces and most of the events I'm doing cakes for are more casual parties, so we cut bigger pieces and send some people home with cake! Good luck. icon_biggrin.gif

Sarah

saycheese Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 7:51pm
post #10 of 15

okay...so are you guys hammering the pointy end down through the TOP tier? or putting pointy end up and dropping the top tier down on it?
if you hammer through the top how do you cover it if you have used fondant and don't plan on putting something on top?

sgauta Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 8:25pm
post #11 of 15

Pushing the sharp end down through all the tiers. I've only done one cake where I wasn't putting anything on top and because you usually cut the dowel a little short of the cake top, I just "patched" the hole with a small amount of fondant and smoothed it out.

Sarah

Pebbles1727 Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 8:59pm
post #12 of 15

Oh cool, thanks to all of you for input. I know I'm overthinking, but if I cut the center dowel 3/4 to 1 inch shorter than a cake, it will not go through the bottom plate, right? For some reason based on the directions I was reading, it sounded like the center dowel will "nail" the cake to the bottom plate too, no? So, what prevents the cake from sliding off the plate or does it not normally do that? Sorry, just a newbie so I know this sounds silly to most of you. Thanks again, P

sgauta Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 11:23pm
post #13 of 15

You do want the dowel to go all the way down to the bottom layer, kind of "nailing" it into the bottom board, yes. Where the dowel is shorter is at the top, so you can patch the hole. I also put a few dobs of buttercream on my bottom board to kind of act as "glue" before I put the bottom tier on it. I've never had a cake slide off the board -- they're heavy by that time (especially if they're covered in fondant) and I take corners slowly! It will all make sense when you're actually doing it! thumbs_up.gif

Sarah

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 11:39pm
post #14 of 15

I think the part that's missing is using a 2nd shorter dowel. Once you have the dowel close to being level with the cake then you just want to take the shorter one and place it right on top of the dowel going through the center of your cake and continue hammering until you have it down through the board. I have one that I always use and it's about 5 inches long. Hope that made sense...

Pebbles1727 Posted 26 Mar 2009 , 1:44am
post #15 of 15

Ohhhh, now it makes sense! Thanks you all a lot! I got it!
Thanks again, P

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