Cake Sizes?...

Decorating By olichka77 Updated 24 Mar 2009 , 10:14am by indydebi

olichka77 Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 4:18am
post #1 of 6

Hello ladies
This is sort of cake decorating. My sister asked me to do her wedding cake, and I was wondering if I do SQUARE 16", 12", 8" will that feed 200? I don't know where else to ask, so I would appreciate your advice or suggestions.
Thanks
Olga

5 replies
patticakesnc Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 4:34am
post #2 of 6

That only does 135 servings. Here is a serving chart. http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

tomatoqeen Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 4:50am
post #3 of 6

According to the chart provided, SQUARE 16-12-8 will give you 196 servings. That's including the top tier -- serving it to guests, not saving it for the 1st anniversary.

JanH Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 4:57am
post #4 of 6

Hi and Welcome to CC, olichka77. icon_smile.gif

Decoding CC acronyms:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2629-.html

Everything you need to know to bake, assemble and decorate stacked/tiered/layer cakes:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

Above has popular CC recipes for: doctored cake mix (WASC and variations), crusting American b/c's using either Crisco or hi-ratio shortening, and fondant. And so much more.

There are (linked) Wilton charts which give serving yields in either party or serving portions (and batter requirements) by pan size... so a 8, 12 & 16" square would yield 32, 72 and 128 servings for a grand total of 232 servings. (Oftentimes, it's not possible to get a perfect match between cake sizes and servings needed. Especially if the bride has a very specific cake "look" in mind.)

It's up to the bride to decide if she wants to pay for the extra servings in order to achieve the desired look. If her budget is the deciding factor, you can make round tiers. A round 6, 9, 12 & 16" tiered/stacked cake will yield: 12, 32, 56 and 100 servings for a grand total of 200 servings!

HTH

JaimeAnn Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 8:55am
post #5 of 6

Follow what JanH said.

Because

1) Most of the time if the caterer or the reception hall is cutting the cake they use the Wilton chart. Unless you provide a specific cutting chart with the cake, Wilton is the standard.

2) When pricing your cakes you need to be pricing at the same standard measure as your competition, Or as stated above provide a cutting chart and per slice size comparison in your quote.
Example : you use Earlenes chart and your pans only give you 135 servings so you have to provide a much larger cake and a lot more work to accommodate the 200 servings, Bride gets a quote from another baker using the Wilton chart and says yes I can accommodate you 200 serving request in a 3 tier cake. Yes I know pricing goes per serving but you are going to have more cost in supplies and hours into the larger cake.

indydebi Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 10:14am
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaimeAnn

Follow what JanH said.

Because

1) Most of the time if the caterer or the reception hall is cutting the cake they use the Wilton chart. Unless you provide a specific cutting chart with the cake, Wilton is the standard.




http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm
Wilton chart (above) shows this cake will serve 232 including the top tier.

A wilton 1x2x4 is a nice sized dessert-size piece of cake. Most people hear "one inch" and they think "paper thin". It's not. It's about the size of a folded over peanut butter sandwich. Here's a pic of the piece of cake: http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1156785

Here's how to cut the cakes the wilton size (same method for round or square): http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

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