chocolate transfer

Decorating By metweety6 Updated 2 Apr 2009 , 8:04am by Rosie2

metweety6 Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 6:02pm
post #1 of 22

ok everyone I need to know how you all ..well most of you on this site made the chocolate transfer.. I am making a cake for my grandsons first birthday for his party this saturday. thanks for the help...
thumbs_up.gif Also i need some tips on a baby shower cake .It is for a boy and the theme is the boston bruins(hockey) any ideas would be great.I think i know what i'm going to do but its fun to see what someone else would do .
Thanks again for any tips and help thumbs_up.gif

21 replies
kakeladi Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 8:03pm
post #2 of 22

Choco transfers are simply piped on wax paper. Not reversed like a FBCT. Cover you pic w/plastic wrap or wax paper and just pipe melted coating/choco over the pic. When it is set/dry peel it off.
Can;t help w/the other idea.

metweety6 Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 9:33pm
post #3 of 22

Thanks...
Sorry I am new at this. so i feel like a dummy when asking questions.
so here it goes .where would i purchase the choco. or is it candy melts that i can purchase at any craft store..
I can make transfers out of bcf but it comes out real thick. i use a coloing book picture for that. so it is bascally the same thing except for flipping it over
Thanks for your help... thumbs_up.gif

djs328 Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 9:47pm
post #4 of 22

exactly as kakeladi described. I also have recently started "mounting" the transfer on a white chocolate background. After the transfer has hardened, I carefully loosen it with an offset spatula, then pipe white (or even dark?) chocolate over the whole area, then place the piped transfer on top of the warm chocolate. Let it all harden then it is much easier to move and less fragile. (Have broken too many!)
Good luck!
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metweety6 Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:03pm
post #5 of 22

thank you well i will try this i'm a little worried but by the looks of everyones art work i think i can do it..i'm just afraid the choco will run..oh well thanks for the tip

ladeebug Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:06pm
post #6 of 22

I do reverse my chocolate transfers. Also, a cheap alternative to candy melts and real chocolate is almond bark.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:17pm
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladeebug

I do reverse my chocolate transfers. Also, a cheap alternative to candy melts and real chocolate is almond bark.




Yeah, me too, and I do alot of them! I don't like the bumpy uneven look of the directly piped ones. Mine are smooth ala buttercream transfers.

giraffe11 Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:17pm
post #8 of 22

I reverse mine as well. Actually, you must reverse them if you are going to make letters, numbers, or words.....otherwise the recipient will have to hold the cake up to a mirror to read it. icon_lol.gif

kakeladi Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:33pm
post #9 of 22

.....Sorry I am new at this. so i feel like a dummy when asking questions....

There are NO DUMB ?s icon_smile.gif If you don't know...someone will instruct you. Many times we will differ in our opinions but what works for one might not for another icon_smile.gif
.......where would i purchase the choco. or is it candy melts......
It can be choco chips; candy melts (from the craft store etc); or almond bark. Real choco needs to be tempered which can be a difficult project for a novice.

metweety6 Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:41pm
post #10 of 22

thank you

dornick Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 10:48pm
post #11 of 22

One mistake I made when first making the transfers was making them too thin. Make sure they are thick enough so they don't break apart.

djs328 Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 12:54am
post #12 of 22

So you don't have to reverse it, and still achieve a smooth finish, you may want to try this:

I pipe mine onto wax paper taped to the back of a cake pan or cookie sheet (I can size things this way if I use the same size as the cake I'm making) and if you gently tap the pan with your finger after piping each little bit, it will settle and smooth the chocolate as well, and I don't have to reverse it. It's really not as hard as you'd think. Also, I melt the chocolate in a disposable piping bag, and let it cool for a minute before piping, so it's not super runny, and you can control your piping with how much you snip off. (I don't use a tip for this.)
I use Mercken's and I like the fact that it is completely edible, and tastes good, too! You can also mix your colors to make what you need. If you haven't seen it, they also have a color mixing chart which is great! (I got one at the cake store where they sell the chocolate) Here's the link:
http://www.streichs.com/instructions/Merckens_color_chart.html
HTH!!

giraffe11 Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 4:46pm
post #13 of 22

I like your choclate transfer animals too.....so cute.....on the Diego cake. The real answer to whether or not you want to reverse is how smooth you want it to be. Your animals are adorable, and the chocolate is smooth and shiny, but definitely not flat. Actually, the slightly puffy texture gives them a 3-D effect, which I really like for the animals. But I might not want the 3-D effect on everything. Anyway, reversing is no big deal.......just use the horizontal flip on your computer and print it out. I have often done this to make transfers that look good from front and back.....can make two transfers and stick them together....kind of fun. Anyway, other than that I usually flip them.....we do the transfers the exact same way. I tried with tips before, and cutting a hole in the bag just works a lot better.
Transfers are really easier than you think. If you search the forums, you can find many different threads about them and there are even online tutorials if you do a google search.

Edited to add that I haven't tried Merckens......only Wilton. Kids seem to be the only ones that eat them and they don't mind the taste. But do you think the Mercken's melt better/easier? Sometimes, the Wilton ones seem to be a little....I don't know....'chunky'....even after being melted. it varies from batch to batch.

djs328 Posted 24 Mar 2009 , 8:50pm
post #14 of 22

giraffe11: I do like the Merckens SOOO much better for taste and smoothness when I melt it - I think you're right - Wilton can get chunky and lumpy...I do a lot of decorating with chocolate, and a lot of times the adults will end up getting a letter or a small decoration or something and really enjoy it.
I totally get what you are saying about the smooth vs flat...I'll have to try that - never thought of reversing it when I print, depending on what I'm doing...and I am def going to try putting 2 back to back - fantastic idea! Thanks for your comments about the Diego cake...(kids just ate the zebra & a palm tree yesterday! DH stole the lion...big kid!) Still learning and figuring out new ideas - thanks for the tips!!
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giraffe11 Posted 25 Mar 2009 , 1:10am
post #15 of 22

Thanks for your tips too, djs! I had never considered how not flipping would add a neat 3-D effect. Seems simple, but I never thought to try it. I will give the Merckens a try as well.

metweety6 Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 6:05pm
post #16 of 22

Thank you all for your tips they were great. I posted the cake that i made with the candy and i did the flip method.. the cake is a 3d winnie the pooh and friends..enjoy....

metweety6 Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 6:06pm
post #17 of 22

Thank you all for your tips they were great. I posted the cake that i made with the candy and i did the flip method.. the cake is a 3d winnie the pooh and friends..enjoy.... thumbs_up.gif

metweety6 Posted 31 Mar 2009 , 6:13pm
post #18 of 22

the title of the cake is Pooh an friends

Rosie2 Posted 1 Apr 2009 , 11:04pm
post #19 of 22

Hi to all. Is there a tutorial here in Cake Central on how to do the chocolate transfer? I have a to make a Toy Story theme cake and wanted to try 'color flow' but I'm afraid to since I've heard color flow images are too fragile...is a chocolate transfer stronger? and, doesn't the chocolate hardens too quick before you finish the outlining? also, how can you make black chocolate for the outline?
Ok, thank you to all!

andysprite Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:00am
post #20 of 22

Sorry to hijack....
would I use the same concept to make a royal icing plaque?

kakeladi Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 12:24am
post #21 of 22

.......heard color flow images are too fragile...is a chocolate transfer stronger? ... doesn't the chocolate hardens too quick before you finish the outlining? also, how can you make black chocolate for the outline?.......

ColorFlo is not that fragile if it is made on plastic wrap and filled properly.
Choco is o.k. as long as it is not hot &/or humid. You want the choco to harden - it doesn't matter if you are finished. Once you do finish the outline you go right into flooding.
You do the exact same thing using RI for ColorFlo. The finished piece just takes longer to dry. I happen to like the look of ColorFlo much better.
Just add black *candy color* to choco melts for black icon_smile.gif NOT paste color - especially gels.

Any shape or design can be made with either technique.

Rosie2 Posted 2 Apr 2009 , 8:04am
post #22 of 22

Ahhh thank you Kakeladi, you're always a saver!! can you please tell what do you mean by 'filled properly' (ColorFlow)?? I was just practicing with ColorFlow and I used tip #1 for the ouline and I think that's too thin...my outline didn't seem very strong. Plus I made my image too small and the small detail gets lost. I will continue practicing....Thank you!!!

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