How To Get Apple Green Color For A Wedding Cake?

Decorating By blueberrycheesecake Updated 23 Mar 2009 , 9:58pm by brincess_b

blueberrycheesecake Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 12:03am
post #1 of 12

Hello, CC users!

I'll be making a 4-tiered wedding cake in few weeks time and I am having this "wedding" shivers because it will be my first time to make one.

The bride wanted an apple green color in her fondant and I was wondering on how to do that. I am not sure if I should mix green with yellow or how much I should use to get this "apple green" color.

Another thing is, I know we should crumbcoat a cake before putting on the fondant, but I wanted to know if I could use buttercream to cover the whole cake before putting the fondant on? Or royal icing would be so much better to use? Would it be ok to "thicken" the icing (not fondant) on the cake, or will this create problems once I start covering the cake with fondant?

Please help! It's a wedding cake so I am getting kind of nervous making one. This isn't a drilll anymore icon_redface.gif

P.S. I also have a texture sheet.. Do i press this on the fondant after I cover the cake with it or press it on the fondant before covering the whole cake? Thanks again!

11 replies
ALVARGA Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 12:40am
post #2 of 12

My son just got married two weeks ago and the colors for the wedding were apple green and brown. If you look at my pictures I did some chocolate cutout cookies and used white fondant with green petal dust and apple green royal icing. I used Americolor colors. I used avocado with a little yellow and a little leaf green. The color came out perfect. Have a green apple or some green ribbon with you when you mix the color so that you know that you are getting close. Remember the color will darken upon standing. If you noticed I also used an impression sheet on the cookie. I rolled out the fondant and then used the impression sheet before I cutout the shape and applied it to the cookie. Finally I dusted the cookies with moss green petal dust. Hope this helps.

JenniferMI Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 1:51am
post #3 of 12

My thoughts would be starting with a lime green, then adding a little Kelly green to it. Just experiment, tiny bits at a time so you don't waste it.

Jen icon_smile.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 8:09am
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrycheesecake

Hello, CC users!

I'll be making a 4-tiered wedding cake in few weeks time and I am having this "wedding" shivers because it will be my first time to make one.

The bride wanted an apple green color in her fondant and I was wondering on how to do that. I am not sure if I should mix green with yellow or how much I should use to get this "apple green" color.

Another thing is, I know we should crumbcoat a cake before putting on the fondant, but I wanted to know if I could use buttercream to cover the whole cake before putting the fondant on? Or royal icing would be so much better to use? Would it be ok to "thicken" the icing (not fondant) on the cake, or will this create problems once I start covering the cake with fondant?

Please help! It's a wedding cake so I am getting kind of nervous making one. This isn't a drilll anymore icon_redface.gif

P.S. I also have a texture sheet.. Do i press this on the fondant after I cover the cake with it or press it on the fondant before covering the whole cake? Thanks again!




P.S.S. I was thinking of using a gold color in liquid form to paint on scroll works made of fondant, but the rest of the accents will be on buttercream or royal icing. How should I do it? Should I paint the gold color after the icing dries out or should I mix it together with the icing before piping it on the cake?

icon_smile.gif

blueberrycheesecake Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 8:27am
post #5 of 12

P.S.S. I was thinking of using a gold color in liquid form to paint on scroll works made of fondant, but the rest of the accents will be on buttercream or royal icing. How should I do it? Should I paint the gold color after the icing dries out or should I mix it together with the icing before piping it on the cake?

blueberrycheesecake Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 8:46am
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALVARGA

My son just got married two weeks ago and the colors for the wedding were apple green and brown. If you look at my pictures I did some chocolate cutout cookies and used white fondant with green petal dust and apple green royal icing. I used Americolor colors. I used avocado with a little yellow and a little leaf green. The color came out perfect. Have a green apple or some green ribbon with you when you mix the color so that you know that you are getting close. Remember the color will darken upon standing. If you noticed I also used an impression sheet on the cookie. I rolled out the fondant and then used the impression sheet before I cutout the shape and applied it to the cookie. Finally I dusted the cookies with moss green petal dust. Hope this helps.




hey thanks! i'll try this! this is so important to me because i will be advertising my works to a lot of people! icon_smile.gif

brincess_b Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 3:41pm
post #7 of 12

are you experienced at fondant - if not definatley do some practicing. the thickness of bc under fondant is all about preferences, some people like a thin crumbcoat (which should cover the whole cake anyway), some people go for a proper layer of bc - so people who dont like fondant get something to eat. it affects how the fondant goes on too. (i wouldnt use royal icing under the fondant, it would be a really different cake then, so youd need to ok it with the bride)
impression mats - i havent got any experience with them, but i think i have read if you do it before on a big bit of fondant, the pattern may stretch.
i dont know what gold colour you are using, is it a lustre dust? if so, it doesnt mix well with icing, you are better to have a yellow icing, and they go over it either as dust, or mixed with alcohol.
good luck!
xx

blueberrycheesecake Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 11:11pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by brincess_b

are you experienced at fondant - if not definatley do some practicing. the thickness of bc under fondant is all about preferences, some people like a thin crumbcoat (which should cover the whole cake anyway), some people go for a proper layer of bc - so people who dont like fondant get something to eat. it affects how the fondant goes on too. (i wouldnt use royal icing under the fondant, it would be a really different cake then, so youd need to ok it with the bride)
- i havent got any experience with them, but i think i have read if you do it before on a big bit of fondant, the pattern may stretch.
i dont know what gold colour you are using, is it a lustre dust? if so, it doesnt mix well with icing, you are better to have a yellow icing, and they go over it either as dust, or mixed with alcohol.
good luck!
xx




hey thanks brincess_b! This has been a detailted answer! icon_smile.gif I have covered cake with fondant once but as far as I can remember, my teacher just crumbcoated and then puton a little icing and then we covered the cake with fondant.

For the gold color, it is not a lustre dust. I've seen a gold coloring for airbrush equipment so it is in liquid form. That's what I am planning to use. Do you think that would be ok?

bobwonderbuns Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 11:14pm
post #9 of 12

Isn't leaf green with a touch of white like apple green?

artscallion Posted 22 Mar 2009 , 11:35pm
post #10 of 12

I've used an impression mat. The first time I used it I thought I would apply it after the fondant was on the cake so that my smoothing efforts wouldn't distort or eliminate the impressed pattern. Boy, was that a mistake! I had to pull the whole thing off and start over again.

First off, by the time the fondant is on the cake and smoothed into place, the fondant has been exposed to the air too long and won't really take the design well at all. And that's with some real pressing! Secondly, you know how involved it is to smooth fondant onto a round cake without creases, etc...imaging how much worse it is to wrap a much less flexible sheet around a cake without disturbing the pattern. Plus, it's literally impossible to wrap it around the cake in one continuous pattern.

After I took the ruined fondant off and started over (luckily I had made twice as much fondant as I needed) I rolled it out, placed the impression mat over, went over it with my rolling pin, and smoothed it over the cake with no problems at all.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 1:33am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

I've used an impression mat. The first time I used it I thought I would apply it after the fondant was on the cake so that my smoothing efforts wouldn't distort or eliminate the impressed pattern. Boy, was that a mistake! I had to pull the whole thing off and start over again.

First off, by the time the fondant is on the cake and smoothed into place, the fondant has been exposed to the air too long and won't really take the design well at all. And that's with some real pressing! Secondly, you know how involved it is to smooth fondant onto a round cake without creases, etc...imaging how much worse it is to wrap a much less flexible sheet around a cake without disturbing the pattern. Plus, it's literally impossible to wrap it around the cake in one continuous pattern.

After I took the ruined fondant off and started over (luckily I had made twice as much fondant as I needed) I rolled it out, placed the impression mat over, went over it with my rolling pin, and smoothed it over the cake with no problems at all.


got this! i was thinking the same thing, too!

thanks a lot! i will definitely follow this instruction. icon_smile.gif

brincess_b Posted 23 Mar 2009 , 9:58pm
post #12 of 12

you mean using the airbrush colour as a paint, not through an airbrush?
im afraid i have no advice on that one, ive neve used any airbrush colour. dont see why it wouldnt work though... maybe start a new post about that one, then you will catch people who have airbrushes and would know!
xx

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%