Can This Fondant Cake Be Done In Buttercream?

Decorating By ashleyandlee Updated 23 May 2009 , 2:04pm by ashleyandlee

ashleyandlee Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 8:56pm
post #1 of 22

I have been decorating cakes for a few years now but am still at a rather novice level. I don't know too many fancy techniques, but have still come up with some decent looking cakes. icon_smile.gif

A friend of mine who knows I do cakes has asked me to make her sisters wedding cake. I have done one wedding cake in the past, and it was my own (so there wasn't a ton of pressure on me). This is my first wedding cake for a paying customer and I need a bit of help!

The cake below is what she has asked me to make.

Image

It looks easy enough (if done in fondant, like in the pic) but she wants it done in buttercream. I know how to get the buttercream super smooth and fondant-looking on the sides (the white icing), but am not sure how to get the scalloped pink edge smooth with buttercream icing.

Any tips? She really wants the cake to look as much as possible like this in buttercream, but I am really not very confident that the pink scalloped edge will look as good as in the pic. I worry if I use the Viva paper towel method over the scalloping to smooth it, it is going to distort it a little bit.

I almost want to tell her it cannot be done in buttercream (at my decorating skill level), but have come to you guys for some suggestions before I do that.

Help??? Thank you so much!

21 replies
sugarcheryl Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 9:13pm
post #2 of 22

Yes but I would use fondant and gumpaste decorations. You also could even do the pink part in buttercream. There is technique where you place parchment paper around the cake and ice the top with pink colored buttercream and make gumpaste beads with the bead maker that you can get at global sugar art. Use a regular ribbon at the bottom and gumpaste bow on top. You can do it it really isn't that hard.

I have a picture of the cake of the technique I just describe its the carrie cake. I did it for my neighbor's daughter who had heart surgery and I named it after her.

ashleyandlee Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 9:16pm
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarcheryl

Yes but I would use fondant and gumpaste decorations. You also could even do the pink part in buttercream. There is technique where you place parchment paper around the cake and ice the top with pink colored buttercream and make gumpaste beads with the bead maker that you can get at . Use a regular ribbon at the bottom and gumpaste bow on top. You can do it it really isn't that hard.

I have a picture of the cake of the technique I just describe its the carrie cake. I did it for my neighbor's daughter who had heart surgery and I named it after her.




Thanks, I'll definitely look into the bead maker! Do you know if there is a tutorial or article showing how to do the parchment paper technique? I'm not quite sure what you mean by it. Thanks!

sugarcheryl Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 9:22pm
post #4 of 22

It was in the ACD magazine Feb/Mar 2006.

sillywabbitz Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 9:50pm
post #5 of 22

Could you talk her into letting you do the pink part in fondant. The whole cake would be iced in buttercream and the scallop would be fondant. To me it's like fondant stripes on a buttercream cake. It's for effect and doesn't really effect the flavor. It's an adorable cake.

ashleyandlee Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 9:55pm
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

Could you talk her into letting you do the pink part in fondant. The whole cake would be iced in buttercream and the scallop would be fondant. To me it's like fondant stripes on a buttercream cake. It's for effect and doesn't really effect the flavor. It's an adorable cake.




That's what I was thinking of doing - just asking her if she would mind that only the pink be done in fondant. Underneath the fondant the cake would be iced with buttercream anyway, so if people REALLY didn't like the fondant they could just take it off. Hmmmm....

MissyTex Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 10:20pm
post #7 of 22

That's what I would do, too...fondant overlay. I've never done two tone, so if I was doing this cake I would do the pink in fondant. You could always practice with both techniques and see which works best for you.

Deb_ Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 11:35pm
post #8 of 22

Before you drive yourself nuts about the design.......are you licensed? If not, you may not be able to deliver/provide the cake to the venue where the wedding is. A lot of venues are requiring that cakes be provided by a licensed decorator.

Just this past weekend I made a B-day cake for a party at Johnson and Wales University's restaurant here in town. They required me to show "proof of business license and insurance" before they would accept and serve the cake............and this was just a Birthday Cake!

Just something to think about, if you need to that is.

Pretty cake BTW. You could make a template to cover the white bc, while you are putting the pink on, or you could airbrush the bc pink, with the white part covered.......kind of like using a stencil.

ashleyandlee Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 11:40pm
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Before you drive yourself nuts about the design.......are you licensed? If not, you may not be able to deliver/provide the cake to the venue where the wedding is. A lot of venues are requiring that cakes be provided by a licensed decorator.




I'm not licensed, but it's not an issue as I'm from a teeny tiny town and the wedding is at the Legion hall. icon_smile.gif

marisanovy Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 12:03am
post #10 of 22

I'm not much experienced also, but I thought that maybe you could spray paint the pink part. Just use a scalloped shaped parchment paper to cover the white part.

I never tried this method, it's just an idea... who knows?!

Welcome to CC and good luck! icon_smile.gif

HowCoolGomo1 Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 12:17am
post #11 of 22

First if you conquer buttercream, the rest will just drive you nuts! That mantra is the only reason I still think I might have nanobot of talent.

My favorite buttercream tools have come from Home Depot paint department.

They are called spackle knives. Beyond cheap, when you compare what is sold to us for cake tools. Look for the bargain spackle knives, then run your freshly moisturized/manicured finger across the edge. No bumps, grabs; buy it. Immediately, go buy your favorite color in spray paint that no man in your life would touch, your signature color. They always return those tools.

If you don't own one, invest in a really good turntable. My favorite is homemade. I lucked out when I bought it. My store wasn't all Wilton. The owner said can I show you something else, when I came up with the Wilton that was offered up in the late '90's. Then he demonstrated the turntable. I was into pretty, not efficiency at the time. He actually told me not to buy the turntable I wanted. Once in my life I listened. Thank heavens!

Wish I could be willing to let my neighbor take it apart, I might have my own business. The stinker almost sings as it zooms.

Your best friend could be a roll of Viva and your hair dryer.



Sorry to everyone, I'm always verbose. Hope I'm not hijacking.

Ruth0209 Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 12:40am
post #12 of 22

HowCool, I use Viva paper towels, but how do you use the hairdryer?

HowCoolGomo1 Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 3:36am
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

HowCool, I use Viva paper towels, but how do you use the hairdryer?




Very carefully!

It has depended on how hard the cake was frozen and who could not forget the mommy who kept telling me she can get it from the grocery store at the same price.

Ok, I might have let something melt.

Oooooooooops!

HowCoolGomo1 Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 4:17am
post #14 of 22

You just do. I can't explain how I do it. Theoretically I have 3 hands.

I let Viva rest on the frozen cake. Then I use my hands or whatever to gently smooth as the hair dryer is doing it's stuff. You have to be quick or everything will come off.

Have you ever tried to wax your legs? It's called get it done or crap monkeys. You might end up with sweet legs or icky crap and hair legs for 6 weeks.

all4cake Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 4:41am
post #15 of 22

I would say to ice it all over in the lighter color...do whatever smoothing technique you do normally...cut a pattern/template from freezer/parchment paper(make sure when you unfold it to press out the creases as well as you can)...secure it to the side of the cake by taping the ends together....with pink(this can be thinned a bit too), ice the top and top area of sides....do the smoothing again....remove paper carefully...attach beads(which can be made with rolled buttercream)....done.

http://cakecentral.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/52155/normal_courseIIIdisplay.JPG

sadsmile Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 4:43am
post #16 of 22

I would use pink spray and go for an uneaven look in the color on purpose... icon_wink.gif

HowCoolGomo1 Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 4:45am
post #17 of 22

I don't know how I do it. Sorry for the leg waxing reference..


All I can tell you is the 3 hands. My cakes are frozen hard. I can't stand doing butter cream on a cake that's not solid.

If you want to PM, I'm willing to send you through the paint department. This won't happen before Friday late.

I have to earn a living, I must do old people taxes. So don't PM or email.

Tomorrow, my tires get rotated, for free. My fluids will be drained and I will be told I need to spend another $400 on my thirteen year old car.

all4cake Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 4:46am
post #18 of 22

airbrushing is a super idea!

Have you thought of a rolled b/c overlay? It's still b/c, right?

HowCoolGomo1 Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 5:33am
post #19 of 22

all4cake, you rock my world.


What a great suggestion!

all4cake Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 3:10pm
post #20 of 22

I wish I could take credit...especially since it rocked your world...but the airbrushing was sadsmile's idea and the overlay was several other posters' idea...I just added the b/c part ..wait! is that the part that rocked your world????? b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c b/c

sweetcakes Posted 19 Mar 2009 , 3:22pm
post #21 of 22

ive done a similar wilton design. ice the sides in white, ice the top in pink. mark the sides with a garland marker then fill in the scalloped area with pink icing, probably using a petal tip or the medium size basketweave tip, then work on smoothing it out and getting a nice clean edge which will be the hardest part. it is doable in BC, but it would be quicker in fondant.

ashleyandlee Posted 23 May 2009 , 2:04pm
post #22 of 22

Thanks for the tips everyone. I contacted the customer and she is okay with me using fondant for the pink part. Whew!

She also wants the big white bow at the top. Do you suggest I make that out of fondant or gum paste? I've never used gum paste before. Is there a tutorial somewhere on how to make bows like this?

Thanks a lot!

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