Substitue For Sour Cream?

Decorating By blueberrycheesecake Updated 21 Mar 2009 , 10:10pm by blueberrycheesecake

blueberrycheesecake Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 8:40am
post #1 of 13

It's me again! Sorry..

But people here have always been full so I end up thinking og CC the whole time a question enters my mind.

Uhmm.. so is there a substitute for sour cream? Maybe something I could whip up myself?

Thanks! Please help!

P.S. what does sour cream do to cakes?

12 replies
majka_ze Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 8:58am
post #2 of 13

Several possibilities:
---- long way ----
2 tablespoons milk
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 cup creamed cottage cheese
Combine ingredients in blender; cover and process until smooth and creamy.
---- fast ----
mix ¾ cup of sour milk or buttermilk plus 1/3-cup butter in a small bowl. Use a whisk or fork to mix it together.
---- another fast ----
1 cup of cream and 1/3cup of lemon juice - mix together

You can find sour cream in cakes when the cake uses baking soda instead of baking powder.
Depending on your recipe, you could probably simply substitute it with buttermilk.
For cakes, an easy substitution is cream and lemon juice.

pastrychef22 Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 4:26pm
post #3 of 13

What i use in place of sour cream in most of my cakes is yogurt. I like this becuase you can get a flavor that corrisponds with your cake to help the flavor.

Vylette Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 6:22pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastrychef22

What i use in place of sour cream in most of my cakes is yogurt. I like this becuase you can get a flavor that corrisponds with your cake to help the flavor.




same here!

and sometimes, if its a chocolate cake, Ive subbed out mayo thinned down with a titch of water added.

sweetlayers Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 6:37pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrycheesecake




P.S. what does sour cream do to cakes?




I once heard Martha Stewart say that sour cream makes cakes very tender.

She was making high hat cupcakes when she said it. I love these.

http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/hi-hat-cupcakes

artscallion Posted 18 Mar 2009 , 6:42pm
post #6 of 13

The trick is not so much matching the texture or creaminess as it is matching the acidity of a substitution. That's what makes the magic happen with the chemistry needed to make things react to each other and rise. Remember, baking is a science.

That being said, I've used the following pretty much interchangeably:

1 cup buttermilk
1 Tbsp lemon juice plus enough milk to make a cup.
1 cup yogurt
1 cup sour cream

blueberrycheesecake Posted 20 Mar 2009 , 11:31am
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

The trick is not so much matching the texture or creaminess as it is matching the acidity of a substitution. That's what makes the magic happen with the chemistry needed to make things react to each other and rise. Remember, baking is a science.

That being said, I've used the following pretty much interchangeably:

1 cup buttermilk
1 Tbsp lemon juice plus enough milk to make a cup.
1 cup yogurt
1 cup sour cream


oh thank you for the replies... but may i ask? is buttermilk supposed to be a powder or liquid?

i saw buttermilk in the cake supply store where i buy my ingredients but it is in powdered form. so i am not sure if it is in powder and I have to mix it with water or buttermilk is supposed to be in liquid form?

blueberrycheesecake Posted 20 Mar 2009 , 11:32am
post #8 of 13

oh thank you for the replies... but may i ask? is buttermilk supposed to be a powder or liquid?

i saw buttermilk in the cake supply store where i buy my ingredients but it is in powdered form. so i am not sure if it is in powder and I have to mix it with water or buttermilk is supposed to be in liquid form?

majka_ze Posted 20 Mar 2009 , 11:33am
post #9 of 13

"Normal" buttermilk is liquid, with clumps in it. It is the liquid which remains after making butter.

blueberrycheesecake Posted 20 Mar 2009 , 11:47am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by majka_ze

Several possibilities:
---- long way ----
2 tablespoons milk
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 cup creamed cottage cheese
Combine ingredients in blender; cover and process until smooth and creamy.
---- fast ----
mix ¾ cup of sour milk or buttermilk plus 1/3-cup butter in a small bowl. Use a whisk or fork to mix it together.
---- another fast ----
1 cup of cream and 1/3cup of lemon juice - mix together

You can find sour cream in cakes when the cake uses baking soda instead of baking powder.
Depending on your recipe, you could probably simply substitute it with buttermilk.
For cakes, an easy substitution is cream and lemon juice.




==================================

is buttermilk supposed to be in powdered form or in liquid form? we have one here but it is in powdered form. do i have to mix water with it? thanks for the suggestion! icon_smile.gif

majka_ze Posted 20 Mar 2009 , 11:54am
post #11 of 13

I found it for you - I hope:
the ratio is 1/3 cup powder to one cup water
It isn't necessary to mix the buttermilk back to liquid - simply add both ingredients to your cake and mix well.
the information comes from http://www.preparedpantry.com/wisconsin-buttermilk-powder.aspx

blueberrycheesecake Posted 21 Mar 2009 , 4:18am
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by majka_ze

I found it for you - I hope:
the ratio is 1/3 cup powder to one cup water
It isn't necessary to mix the buttermilk back to liquid - simply add both ingredients to your cake and mix well.
the information comes from http://www.preparedpantry.com/wisconsin-buttermilk-powder.aspx


hey thanks! this is will be a great help to me! icon_smile.gif

God bless!

blueberrycheesecake Posted 21 Mar 2009 , 10:10pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastrychef22

What i use in place of sour cream in most of my cakes is yogurt. I like this becuase you can get a flavor that corrisponds with your cake to help the flavor.




hi! i tried yougurt as you suggested and it was definitely yummy! the cake was awesome!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%