Urgent: Heating Core

Decorating By cakegirlcakes Updated 16 Mar 2009 , 2:44pm by Maris307

cakegirlcakes Posted 14 Mar 2009 , 11:28pm
post #1 of 11

Hi again -
i am making my cake layers 3" deep (in a 2" deep cake pan, by collaring the pan) and was wondering if i HAD to use a heating core for a 3" deep cake layer. i don't have one but need to bake ASAP.
thanks in advance for your wisdom!!!!!

10 replies
jess2523 Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 1:09am
post #2 of 11

I wouldn't think the extra depth would make a heating core necessary, it would depend on the size of the cake pan you are using. You can always put a flower nail in the middle if you're worried about it.


cakegirlcakes Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 1:37am
post #3 of 11

will do. thank you Jess!

campbelland Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 12:00pm
post #4 of 11

Hi, I use a upside flower nail in all my sheet cakes and even use 2 in the big ones, just space them out side by side. Works great and you get double use out of your flower nails ( I have several!). Sandy

Redlotusninjagrl Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 3:25pm
post #5 of 11

Without trying to hi-jack ths thread, exactly how do you use the nail? I covered mine in pam and cooked my 10" cake. i tried to take it out immediately but ended up taking out the middle of my cake. I figure it is for my final cake in Wilton Class III so it isn't the end of the world. I stuffed the middle back in the hole. Hehehe! How do I get that sucker out without messing up my cake? Should I let it cool first? Or should I try brushing cake release on it instead of using pam? I have read several threads where people suggest this, but I obviously did something wrong. Thanks!

campbelland Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 4:30pm
post #6 of 11

Yes I spray mine with Bakers Joy, the kind with flour in it or you can use other brands, I usually use the cheapest kind. I pour in my cake batter, tap to remove air, set in the 2 flower nails (large in first) put on my baking strips and bake. When my cake is done I set it on a cooling rack for about a minute or until the sides of the cake pulls away from the pan the pop out the cake on a cooling rack. I then remove the flower nails, I very seldom have a problem with getting them out. Hope this helps. Sandy

Arriva Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 4:42pm
post #7 of 11

I bought a heating core and used it once. That was enough for me. I use homemade cake release and it is the best stuff since sliced bread. I "paint" the cake release ALL of the the flower nail and put the flower nail with the point up in my pan that has already been painted with cake release. Then I pour the batter in the pan, careful to not move the flower nail around too much. When I take the cake out the oven, I let it rest for a few minutes and then turn it upside onto a cooling rack. At that point I carefully remove the flower nail (or nails depending on how large the pan is). The nail will be VERY hot -- but that is the point isn't it?


PamelaMichele Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 3:24am
post #8 of 11

I am a little confused by these answers. Does it matter if you put in the flower nail and then put in the batter or should you put in the batter first and then the flower nail should set on top? Any clarification would be much appreciated. Thanks.

CakeMommy3 Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 4:22am
post #9 of 11

I pour the batter in the pans and then just stick the flower nail in the middle. And I let all my cakes cool in the pans, wrapped in foil over night. I have never had a problem with them or the flower nail sticking, and I use a home made cake release. And I also bake at 325 degrees.

CarolAnn Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 4:44am
post #10 of 11

I use a flower nail in my half sheets and my 10" and larger cakes. I use cake release (home made) to coat the sides of pan and about an inch down on the bottom and then line my pan with parchment paper. I coat the whole nail with release and put it in the pan first then put in the parchment with the nail sticking through. You can put the nail in on the parchment paper but it's neater if it's under. Do yourself a favor and let your cakes cool completely and your nails will come out more easily and with less damage. Just give it a twist and remove. I know that some don't line their pans but I just won't trust a cake bottom with just the release. One wrecked cake taught me that lesson.

Maris307 Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 2:44pm
post #11 of 11

To those of you that make a home made cake release, if you don't mind, what is your recipe? Also for those of you that bake at 325, how much more time do you give your cakes? Thanks

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