So Depressed! Cake Wreck Situation Here.

Decorating By chrissypie Updated 16 Mar 2009 , 12:46am by KeltoKel

chrissypie Posted 14 Mar 2009 , 4:21am
post #1 of 14

Does anyone know how to get dark green buttercream? Not dark like hunter green but a really good grassy green? I just ruined a huge mixer full of buttercream because I couldn't get the color I wanted ( it looked like a mint green) and put so much dang coloring in, it tasted nasty. Now this cake I had been planning for 2 weeks is basically going in the trash. I was sending it with my hubby to a party thing tomorrow, I have no ingredients left, so I am done. I spend all day baking 3 cakes, made 3 batches of frosting, got to the green and screwed the whole thing up. I am now defeated, but would like to know for next time. If there is a next time. I feel so defeated that I don't even feel like making another cake again.

Thanks for listening to my rant and anytips on the color would be appreciated!

13 replies
cindy6250 Posted 14 Mar 2009 , 4:27am
post #2 of 14

Do you not think you can salvage the icing at all? I didn't think the coloring would alter the taste of the icing. I have never had that happen. Don't be discouraged, believe me we have all had disasters....Do you still have the icing? What about adding some extra vanilla or butter flavor the mask the dye taste? Do you have any white coloring? That would lighten your icing.
When I want a darker grass green, I add some forest green to it. HTH

KathysCC Posted 14 Mar 2009 , 4:37am
post #3 of 14

What kind of coloring were you using? I've never found that green icing color added that much flavor. I had to make an entire batch of green for a large cake and used almost a whole bottle of Wilton leaf green. It came out a nice dark green with not much flavor change that I could notice.

You do know that it will dry a shade or two darker also. What you think is mint color, might dry darker than you think.

Don't lose hope, maybe it is not the coloring you are tasting.

We all have bad cake days! Pick yourself up and try again. Try making just a half cup of icing into the shade you want to see how much dye it will take, taste it, and spread some on a white plate to dry for a half hour or so. You will see it darken.

kakeladi Posted 14 Mar 2009 , 2:58pm
post #4 of 14

You have gotten good advice. I hope you did not really trash a huge mixer full of icing!! It really can't be that bad. Flavoring can be added to over come color tastes.
Also as was said, it will darken as it sits - overnight is besticon_smile.gif
Blue and yellow make green in the right amounts.

tonedna Posted 14 Mar 2009 , 3:17pm
post #5 of 14

I never had issues with the green from Wilton. But if you want to save some time and color,
do the crumbcoat in white then the second coat in the color you are using, that way you dont have to use as much color in one cake.

As for a beautiful green, you can use a moss green from wilton, and if you need it more brigther then add leaf green. But the leaf green is too bright for my taste.
Edna icon_smile.gif

chrissypie Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 3:45pm
post #6 of 14

Thanks everyone! yeah, I did trash the icing. Just didn't work out for me. I tried using Americolor first, then wilton, what a nightmare. I don't know what was going wrong. I wanted a bright green grass look. I have gotten the color before. I am starting to wonder if it was the icing recipe that could have changed how the color took? I dunno. Anyhow, will learn from this and move on! Yeah, it tasted gross, I used tons of color, after a while it became like a science experiment for me.! LOL!

Kitagrl Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 4:00pm
post #8 of 14

That's weird! I find green to be a strong color, esp the leaf green...it doesn't take as much green to get a bright color as maybe red or black. Sorry you had the problems!

The only time I had trouble with nasty icing is using Crisco shortening...sometimes I would open the can and it would smell like chemicals...and so did my icing. I now use generic shortening and avoid that problem.

MamaMayhem Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 4:10pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamieAgain

I meant the taste, Wilton makes icing taste like dog poop if you have to tint something pretty dark.




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Dog Poop! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

To the OP, sorry that happened, it must be frustrating. Don't let it keep you down, your cakes are too pretty to quit.

sweettoothmom1 Posted 15 Mar 2009 , 4:19pm
post #10 of 14

oh, my cousin told me about a tip for black that should work just the same with this..... cover the cake in white buttercream as usual. then make a small batch of green. it will be slightly more soft because of the coloring adding. put a thin layer of green over the white. hope it works. i havent tried it yet, but the theory sounds good icon_smile.gif all the best.

tracycakes Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 12:09am
post #11 of 14

Next time, you try coloring a small bit of the icing until you get the color you want. Then you get an idea of the amount and ratio of each color.

Sorry this happened to you. I know it's very frustrating.

CristyInMiami Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 12:34am
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I never had issues with the green from Wilton. But if you want to save some time and color,
do the crumbcoat in white then the second coat in the color you are using, that way you dont have to use as much color in one cake.

As for a beautiful green, you can use a moss green from wilton, and if you need it more brigther then add leaf green. But the leaf green is too bright for my taste.
Edna icon_smile.gif




THats a good idea. I never thought about the crumbcoat in white! Thats why i love this place so much!

tonedna Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 12:41am
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CristyInMiami

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

I never had issues with the green from Wilton. But if you want to save some time and color,
do the crumbcoat in white then the second coat in the color you are using, that way you dont have to use as much color in one cake.

As for a beautiful green, you can use a moss green from wilton, and if you need it more brigther then add leaf green. But the leaf green is too bright for my taste.
Edna icon_smile.gif



THats a good idea. I never thought about the crumbcoat in white! Thats why i love this place so much!




This is the best way to do it. Not only saves you time and color, you learn how to do a second coat without playing with your crumcbcoat, cause as soon as you see white, that means you are playing with it.
Edna icon_smile.gif

KeltoKel Posted 16 Mar 2009 , 12:46am
post #14 of 14

I always find that you have to let colors sit for awhile for them to become darker. Red may look pink when I go to bed, but when I wake in the morning, it is often red. Same with blue and green.

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