How To Cover An Hourglass Cake In Fondant?

Decorating By Rylan Updated 13 Mar 2009 , 5:10am by Sarsi

Rylan Posted 11 Mar 2009 , 11:26pm
post #1 of 7

I am planning on making a 8, 10 or maybe 12 inch tall hourglass shaped cake. Something that looks like a corsette. I want to know the best method to cover a cake shaped like that, without having to deal with a lot of problems. Do I cover it the same way as I would cover plain round cake? or do I wrap fondant around it? I would appreciate it if someone could help. THANK YOU.

6 replies
vmertsock Posted 12 Mar 2009 , 12:36am
post #2 of 7

I wrap and put a separate piece on top then work the seams together a bit so they aren't horribly obvious and plan a design around the seams so no one knows they're there.

Rylan Posted 12 Mar 2009 , 4:58am
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmertsock

I wrap and put a separate piece on top then work the seams together a bit so they aren't horribly obvious and plan a design around the seams so no one knows they're there.


Have your tried covering it in the regular way where you just lay fondant from the top? If so have you had any problems?

soygurl Posted 12 Mar 2009 , 5:42am
post #4 of 7

I've covered a sphere in fondant before, and I think it would work a similar way with an hourglass. You have to use a really big piece, and roll it a little thicker than usual (to account for stretching and lots of smoothing). When you get the part where it starts getting narrower, work from top to bottom in little sections, lifting and smoothing the fondant. Do NOT try to smooth to the sides at all! Just top to bottom in narrow sections.
Having never personally done an hourglass shape, I'm not sure if it would be easier to smooth from top to middle (narrowest part) all the way around, and then smooth the bottom half of the cake the same way, or to go all the way from top to bottom at once (confused yet?). My instincts say to smooth the top half of the cake first, then go onto the bottom half. Always working the same way: Lift up little sections, and smooth from top to bottom only. Just keep working it.

With all THAT said icon_rolleyes.gif if there's any way to work a few fondant seams into the design, I would do it in sections instead! Might be way easier. Do one top panel, and one or more wrapped around the sides.

Rylan Posted 12 Mar 2009 , 8:36am
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterfallsoygurl

I've covered a sphere in fondant before, and I think it would work a similar way with an hourglass. You have to use a really big piece, and roll it a little thicker than usual (to account for stretching and lots of smoothing). When you get the part where it starts getting narrower, work from top to bottom in little sections, lifting and smoothing the fondant. Do NOT try to smooth to the sides at all! Just top to bottom in narrow sections.
Having never personally done an hourglass shape, I'm not sure if it would be easier to smooth from top to middle (narrowest part) all the way around, and then smooth the bottom half of the cake the same way, or to go all the way from top to bottom at once (confused yet?). My instincts say to smooth the top half of the cake first, then go onto the bottom half. Always working the same way: Lift up little sections, and smooth from top to bottom only. Just keep working it.

With all THAT said icon_rolleyes.gif if there's any way to work a few fondant seams into the design, I would do it in sections instead! Might be way easier. Do one top panel, and one or more wrapped around the sides.


Thanks waterfallssoygurl. That perfectly makes sense. I think I should try it. I'm just a little scared since I dont want to waste fondant. Hopefully it works.

soygurl Posted 13 Mar 2009 , 3:47am
post #6 of 7

Glad to help. I hope it works well for you! icon_biggrin.gif

Sarsi Posted 13 Mar 2009 , 5:10am
post #7 of 7

Yeah, that would be scary!!! Let us know how it works!! I'm very curious!! I would love to make an hour glass shaped cake, but the fondant scares me!! LOL

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