Springform Pan??????

Decorating By maralin Updated 10 Mar 2009 , 2:53pm by maralin

maralin Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 6:56pm
post #1 of 14

I recently started the Wilton Course at ac moore & the instructor requires i take a cake to the following class and it should be a 8'' round x 3" deep....I have been all over regular crafts stores & i only seem to find 2" deep.....but they do have 3" deep springform pan....is it the same? HOw doees a spring form pan work????

help please!!
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13 replies
Mom23girls Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:13pm
post #2 of 14

A springform pan has a latch on the side that allows you to release the sides of the cake. It is typically used for cheesecakes - but since it's the only 10" pan I have I use it for all of my round cakes. I haven't had a problem with it and actually like how easy it is to remove the cake.

As to if this is what they want you to bring to the class, I have no idea since I haven't been able to take any classes yet.....

maralin Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:27pm
post #3 of 14

HOW DOES IT WORK?? how does the latch work?

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:42pm
post #4 of 14

The latch opens and closes the part of the pan that goes around the sides. The bottom is a separate piece (in other words the pan is two pieces).

Have you tried a store that specifically caters to cake decorating? They have 3" pans. Also, if you don't want to invest in that, you can ask your instructor if you can make two 2" cakes, maybe. Sometimes you don't get a full 2" on each cake and if they come out 1 and a 1/2 then you'll be okay (just a very thin layer of buttercream between the layers though).

LittleLinda Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:42pm
post #5 of 14

Maralin,
Maybe she wants you to bring a layer cake. It will be at least three inches when stacked. I imagine you are going to be learning something to do on the sides of a cake like basket weave or string work and she wants you to have the height. Don't fret about finding a three inch pan. Just make a layer cake.

tracey1970 Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:47pm
post #6 of 14

I bought a Wilton 8" round x 3" high pan at Michael's. I'm surprised that you are having a hard time finding one. Wishing you luck in locating one!

maralin Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:54pm
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracey1970

I bought a Wilton 8" round x 3" high pan at Michael's. I'm surprised that you are having a hard time finding one. Wishing you luck in locating one!




i WENT TO MICHAELS & 2 AC MOORES & NOTHING!!! Thats why i was asking if a spring form wasthe same thing ..buti have never used one!

majka_ze Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 7:57pm
post #8 of 14

Here most people use springform pan. The cake bakers here mostly divide in a group who cannot imagine to bake without springform pan and another group who can bake in any pan you give them.
How the springform pan works: You open the latch - the wire part to the left and the bottom falls down. This is useful because you don't need to turn the cake - you can leave it on the bottom part, release the spring and slip it over the cake.
It looks like this.
Image
However, most people don't bother to bake the cake "full height" - they bake 2x or 3x each layer separately.
You definitively can bake the whole cake at once in 3in deep springform pan - I have done it. But I wouldn't bother - if you have 2in deep pan or you are more comfortable with it - bake 2x your cake, torte it, get it to 3in height - either bake 1 cake from half recipe or eat the remaining layer straight away icon_biggrin.gif
Higher pan can be uncomfortable for you - you need either baking core (or flower pin as core) or you need to lower the baking temperature and bake it longer.

maralin Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 8:04pm
post #9 of 14

[quote="LittleLinda"]Maralin,
Maybe she wants you to bring a layer cake.



ok.....u just made me think....did she say that???? hummmmmmm..no , i think i remember she said " u need a 8" round by 3"deep " pan!!

icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gif

help!!!!

maralin Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 8:14pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by majka_ze

Here most people use springform pan. The cake bakers here mostly divide in a group who cannot imagine to bake without springform pan and another group who can bake in any pan you give them.
How the springform pan works: You open the latch - the wire part to the left and the bottom falls down. This is useful because you don't need to turn the cake - you can leave it on the bottom part, release the spring and slip it over the cake.
It looks like this.
Image
However, most people don't bother to bake the cake "full height" - they bake 2x or 3x each layer separately.
You definitively can bake the whole cake at once in 3in deep springform pan - I have done it. But I wouldn't bother - if you have 2in deep pan or you are more comfortable with it - bake 2x your cake, torte it, get it to 3in height - either bake 1 cake from half recipe or eat the remaining layer straight away icon_biggrin.gif
Higher pan can be uncomfortable for you - you need either baking core (or flower pin as core) or you need to lower the baking temperature and bake it longer.








THANKS SOO MUCH....BUT IT SEEMS COMPLICATED.lol..i think i will stick to the regular cake pan! icon_smile.gif

Liniti Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 8:26pm
post #11 of 14

...and this is exactly why I am not going to take the classes and just re-learn it all on my own......lol! icon_wink.gif

Bijoudelanuit Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 11:34pm
post #12 of 14

It doesn't absolutely have to be baked in a 3 inch high pan. You can use regular 2 inch pans and make a 2 layer cake. You just need the height so that you can work well with the technique(s) they'll be teaching.

jer702 Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 11:45pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijoudelanuit

It doesn't absolutely have to be baked in a 3 inch high pan. You can use regular 2 inch pans and make a 2 layer cake. You just need the height so that you can work well with the technique(s) they'll be teaching.




I agree.

maralin Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 2:53pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijoudelanuit

It doesn't absolutely have to be baked in a 3 inch high pan. You can use regular 2 inch pans and make a 2 layer cake. You just need the height so that you can work well with the technique(s) they'll be teaching.






Thanks so much..i will do just that!!! thumbs_up.gif

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