Most Effective Airbrush "booth"?

Decorating By handymama Updated 10 Mar 2009 , 3:24am by handymama

handymama Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 5:42pm
post #1 of 12

After I posted my "airbrush disaster" some of you have suggested that I use a big box to airbrush in. To those of you who do much airbrushing: since the side of the box that's towards you is open, does much food color "bounce back" or otherwise escape into the air? Is there a way to capture this as well? This stuff landed on every square inch of my bakery and I'm still cleaning. Thing is, you can't see it until it's touched with something wet (like white gumpaste!) My husband is insisting that I never airbrush again-- which is just plain silly since it's MY bakery-- but he is right about it not being worth two full days of cleaning. In better weather I could set everything up outside, but there will be many times that that just isn't practical.
Oh yeah, and to those who watch Ace of Cakes: have you noticed that they airbrush practically everything and don't seem to have any sort of enclosed area for it? Wide open spaces with racks full of stuff nearby. How do they do that? icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif

11 replies
kakeladi Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 6:40pm
post #2 of 12

As for Ace....yes I have noticed it and wondered about the 'over spray' icon_sad.gif What we don't see might be a separate room ?

Using a BIG box helps contain most of the spray. It's well worth the effort to find such a box icon_smile.gif

tiggy2 Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 8:16pm
post #3 of 12

Here's a link from Earlene's site that shows how to build and airbrush booth. Doesn't look too complicated and I'm sure your husband could do it for you http://www.earlenescakes.com/AirbrushCabInst.html

handymama Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 10:27pm
post #4 of 12

Tiggy--thanks for the pattern. I'm the builder of the family, and this is something I can certainly do. I'm thinking of making the sides of foam core so it isn't as heavy (hinges would be attached with nuts and bolts in stead of screws), and probably making it a bit bigger. We have a couple of businesses in town that sell used building equipment so I should be able to come up with a fan. Sometimes they have things that are new, which is what I prefer. I'm surprised the fan can still draw air adequately with the foam filters, but apparently it can and that's wonderful! Thanks so much for taking the time to look this up for me.

handymama Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 10:29pm
post #5 of 12

Tiggy--thanks for the pattern. I'm the builder of the family, and this is something I can certainly do. I'm thinking of making the sides of foam core so it isn't as heavy (hinges would be attached with nuts and bolts in stead of screws), and probably making it a bit bigger. We have a couple of businesses in town that sell used building equipment so I should be able to come up with a fan. Sometimes they have things that are new, which is what I prefer. I'm surprised the fan can still draw air adequately with the foam filters, but apparently it can and that's wonderful! Thanks so much for taking the time to look this up for me.

tiggy2 Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 1:12am
post #6 of 12

You're welcome! Let me know how it works out as I'd like to build one too.

cinderspritzer Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 1:21am
post #7 of 12

Duff has a separate area in his shop where most of the airbrushing is done. It's been shown on a couple episodes.


I'm gonna try my first airbrushed cake later this week, and I'm scared because of all the horror stories I read about over-spray icon_wink.gif

handymama Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 1:34am
post #8 of 12

cinder--my bakery is 16 x 20 with an 8 x8 pantry at the back. The color mist was inside cupboards, on every horizontal surface and many vertical, in the pantry (even though the door was mostly closed), on the ceiling light fixtures, on everything in the desk area in the back corner--you name it. And the hard part is that you can't see it. It shows up when you touch it with something damp. Even though I've cleaned and cleaned, I'm wondering if I'll have "red rain" in my bakery this summer if the humidity gets high. So, moral of the story: by all means do what the wise ladies here have said and get a big box to use as a spray booth. I know for sure that I will need to airbrush again, and also that I want to spray pearl dust, so I'll do what's necessary to make this work.

Molly2 Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 1:54am
post #9 of 12

I can not wait hubby is building me one this summer

Molly icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

KatieKake Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 1:55am
post #10 of 12

I am wondering if you have a forced air furnace, (I think that is what they are called) when the furnace come on, a fan in the furnace turns on and blows the hot air out. If that fan comes on while your airbrushing, the chances of your having coloring all over everything are very good. Found that out the hard way, now I watch it when I air brush, wait for the furnace to turn off, and if it starts in again while I am working, well that is a good time for a break.

I made my self a air brush booth, using clear plastic, they kind you use to roll out your fondant, pvc pipe, some 90 degree angles, attached the plastic to the pipe with velcro, I have no place to store anything big, so this works fine I can take it down in a couple of minutes and it doesn't take much longer than that to set up.

Molly2 Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 2:09am
post #11 of 12

KatieKake

Do You have a picture of your booth it sounds really neat

Molly

handymama Posted 10 Mar 2009 , 3:24am
post #12 of 12

Good thinking Katie, but no forced air furnace. On top of that, I have a $400 air cleaner, plus an exhaust fan in the ceiling (both of which were on)

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%