An equivalent for Crisco or Shortening?? From Australia!

Baking By My2Terrors Updated 11 Apr 2015 , 9:51am by Scottga

earthchylde Posted 13 Feb 2012 , 12:38am
post #31 of 57

Copha is not remotely similar, and is predominately coconut oil. For a more similar product try Frymasta. It is right there next to the Copha, in a yellow packet with red lettering, and is predominately palm oil. Frymasta will look, smell, taste and behave similarly to Crisco. Don't get confused with Supafry, that's tallow (animal fat).

suzukipammy Posted 13 Feb 2012 , 10:32am
post #32 of 57

in the UK we call it Trex maybe you have that in Australia?

bigdi Posted 25 Apr 2012 , 8:23am
post #33 of 57

If your recipe calls for Crisco DO NOT use Copha. It is very different. Only similarity is the color, If you live near a David Jones store or a good deli that sells overseas products, you can buy Crisco. There is no equivalent in Australia, and I moved here in 1960 - have seen nothing like it here.

soozicake Posted 26 Apr 2012 , 9:09am
post #34 of 57

Also some of the speciality cake decorating shops now stock the equavilent of Crisco

Bluehue Posted 26 Apr 2012 , 2:37pm
post #35 of 57

Oh good grief - people, just google Crisco in Australia - or buy direct from USA Foods in Melbourne.... don't even bother using Copha instead of Crisco - you will not get the taste nor consistancey you require...
They are two different things - ............... couldn't imagine biting into a cake with copha as the base - icon_eek.gif
Spend your money wisely on the correct imgrediants - that way you will have have the correct end product.

Bluehue

dicroz Posted 26 Apr 2012 , 5:50pm
post #36 of 57

Hi
As others have said, Crisco and copha are not alike. I have found that some cake decorating stores sell crisco and also usa foods. I like it but I know a lot don't, definitely a personal preference. Where are you located?

Regards
Di

MissSmiley Posted 10 May 2012 , 12:46pm
post #37 of 57

I found fry master vegetable oil in the butter section near copha and other frying solids at woolies !!! Is exactly like crisco i leave it out when I'm going to use it !!! It's in a yellow foil packet with red writing Hope this helps it has done for me and was only $3.00 happy decorating icon_smile.gif

soozicake Posted 10 May 2012 , 2:06pm
post #38 of 57

I'm gonna have to give Frymaster a try. Much more convenient to buy than Crisco from DJ's food hall in the CBD. Cheers

wernie Posted 14 May 2012 , 9:57am
post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Febe

Australian living in the US here.

CRISCO and COPHA are no where equivalent. Crisco is very soft and does not set up like copha does and it has a really awful taste to it. And you definitely can't use it for Chocolate Crackles. I would be very careful subsituting copha for crisco in some of these recipes.




American living in Oz here.

Totally agree on what you said icon_smile.gif

medusas_touch Posted 16 May 2012 , 7:22am
post #40 of 57

So, out of curiosity, could I use Copha in lieu of Crisco in a recipe for chocolate cookies? If the taste of Copha is better than Crisco, wouldn't it be better to use the Copha?

I'm still looking for that perfect recipe for cookies that don't spread and don't need to be double cut. I don't like the rough edges from double cutting my cookies...

Any advice?

TIA

wernie Posted 16 May 2012 , 7:37am
post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by medusas_touch

So, out of curiosity, could I use Copha in lieu of Crisco in a recipe for chocolate cookies? If the taste of Copha is better than Crisco, wouldn't it be better to use the Copha?

I'm still looking for that perfect recipe for cookies that don't spread and don't need to be double cut. I don't like the rough edges from double cutting my cookies...

Any advice?

TIA




I personally don't really ever use Crisco in my cookie recipes (well, when I was living in the US that is). I just use butter and make sure I chill the cookies well after cutting/before baking and usually never have to 'double cut' them. So, if it were me (and this is what I do here) I would just use butter instead of Copha. icon_smile.gif

leemetuarau Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 1:12pm
post #42 of 57

i use copha and it is extremely hard, but i grate it so that it softens faster in room temp, give that the air is warm and not cold..

thekoo Posted 20 Jun 2012 , 5:15pm
post #43 of 57

Hello - according to Nigella, Copha is supposed to be the SAME as Crisco:
http://www.nigella.com/kitchen-queries/view/1697

"In the US Crisco is the best known and there is also an organic solid vegetable shortening made by Earth Balance. In Australia the best known brand is Copha."

I need to use Crisco and I'm in Melbourne. After reading this thread, I'm not going to use Copha - despite what Nigella says. I'm going to try just using butter because I don't have time to drive out to the USA Foods shop or wait for it to be delivered. If it's a disaster, I'll post back and warn you all. I'm making Kourambiedes for teh 1st time.

derbyfour Posted 30 Mar 2013 , 1:41am
post #44 of 57

Not so Nigella..................

 

Copha does not behave the same as Crisco and is not a proper substitute.

 

I have successfully substituted Crisco with FRYMASTA (Coles $2.55 for 500g).  It is cheaper than Crisco.

 

If you feel better using Crisco,the Crisco Australia website  http://www.crisco.com.au/

Or

Buy Crisco at cooking/baking suppliers, Cake decorating supply shops, DJ's and Myer, or USA Foods Australia http://www.usafoods.com.au/

Roberts confectionery http://www.robertsconfectionery.com.au/products/shortening-crisco-1-lb.html

Baking pleasures http://bakingpleasures.com.au/ss/Crisco-shortening#/

Cake Central http://bakingpleasures.com.au/ss/Crisco-shortening#/

 

Good luck.

a2thebee Posted 8 Jul 2013 , 1:45pm
post #45 of 57

AFor the Aussies that live in Canberra the Asian store at the fish wick markets sells crisco as well as la torta in majura park :)

copperiw Posted 13 Jul 2013 , 12:57am
post #46 of 57

Try using LARD, it's what all bakers use for cakes and pastries etc, it's soft just like CRISCO.

AnnieCahill Posted 13 Jul 2013 , 1:13am
post #47 of 57

ANo lard, that is animal fat. Crisco is vegetable fat.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 13 Jul 2013 , 1:23am
post #48 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by copperiw 

Try using LARD, it's what all bakers use for cakes and pastries etc, it's soft just like CRISCO.

No.

Being soft does not constitute an appropriate substitute, and I can promise you that 'all' bakers most certainly do not use it! Gross.

morganchampagne Posted 13 Jul 2013 , 1:45am
post #49 of 57

AYeah not to pile on but Lard and vegetable shortening are not interchangeable. Don't do that I can promise you it will be a disaster

Heths13 Posted 22 Nov 2013 , 1:31am
post #50 of 57

I have found that Coconut Oil is the best equivalent to something such as Crisco. I'm an American living in Australia so I have to do some experimenting with my recipes from the States. But Coconut Oil is the best substitute. I've used it in a fabulous white cake recipe and couldn't taste it once the cake was baked.

 

I've also had to use a few different ingredients when it comes to things such as Sweet Potato pie. Let me know if you need anymore help!

Cylajen Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 5:10am
post #51 of 57

Hi all, I know I'm a bit late joining the conversation, but I've read through it all and am wondering, since the general consensus seems to be the best substitute available is Coconut Oil, has anyone tried it and found if it gives white buttercream, like Crisco does? Thanks!

Faradaye Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 7:59am
post #52 of 57

AI wouldn't try to make buttercream with coconut oil as it has such a low melting temperature, I don't think it would have enough stability. Unless you were prepared for your cake to be permanently in the fridge, and cold cake is not always delicious.

I can't see coconut oil buttercream being any good at room temperature.

derbyfour Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 9:08pm
post #53 of 57

Coconut oil or Copha is NOT a substitute for Crisco.  It behaves differently and sets harder (think chocolate crackles).  Crisco is soft, looks like margarine, melts and behaves the same as butter or marg.  Copha or Coconut oil on the other hand is a solid oil in a hard block and melts to look like clear cooking oil. 

It has a higher cooking temperature and is good for cooking chips.

 

Buy Crisco here:

The Crisco Australia website http://www.crisco.com.au/

USA Foods Australia ~~http://www.usafoods.com.au/

Buy Crisco at cooking/baking suppliers, Cake decorating supply shops, DJ's and Myer,

Roberts confectionery http://www.robertsconfectionery.com.au/products/shortening-crisco-1-lb.html Baking pleasures http://bakingpleasures.com.au/ss/Crisco-shortening#/

Cake Central http://bakingpleasures.com.au/ss/Crisco-shortening#/

 

You can buy the white Crisco or the yellow Crisco.  It has a soft consistency, like margarine, not at all in a hard block like Copha or coconut oil. I buy it in tins, it keeps well in the fridge.

 

Saying that, for some things you can use FRYMASTA instead of LARD as it is a coconut based.   It is also hard like lard and but has vegetable oil in it. You can successfully substitute if for recipes that call for lard.

 

I wouldn't use it in cake decorating at all.

tasfoods Posted 8 Jan 2015 , 3:04am
post #55 of 57

THE CLOSEST THING YOU CAN BUY IN THE SUPERMARKET TO CRISCO IS NUTELEX. COCONUT OIL IS TOO UNSTABLE. IF YOU MAKE BUTTERCREAM WITH THAT, AT THE FIRST SIGN OF WARMTH IT WILL DISINTEGRATE. IF YOU GO TO A BAKERY WHOLESALERS (IN TASMANIA WE HAVE PFD) YOU CAN BUY SOFT BAKERY MARGARINE WHICH IS WHITE AND VERY STABLE (DOES NOT NEED TO BE REFRIGERATED) IN A CARTON. 

tasfoods Posted 8 Jan 2015 , 3:12am
post #56 of 57

Its not lard. I worked in a patisserie for 5 years - its a soft white vegetable shortening that is purchased through wholesale food outlets. Lard is animal fat based.

Scottga Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 9:51am
post #57 of 57

Since the wife came out here from the US and is an old southern cook (her words not mine) we have explored the Crisco potentials. This is what we found for frying (ie fried chicken etc ) use rice bran oil (she has actually upset the relatives telling them the chicken comes out better then when done in Crisco)... For baking good old Aussie Fairy Cooking margarine (equivalent by weight) there is a very useful chart http://www.destitutegourmet.com/metric-conversion-chart/ as it also shows weight / measures for various ingredients. And yes, her Cat Head Biscuits came out amazing using fairy... Reason we figured this is that the US biscuits are our scones and mums recipe was fairy margarine based... So the simple substitution by weight and volume is Fairy margarine for baking and Copha (we tried the biscuits, never worked quite right) for the sweeter yet stiffer candy mixes that Crisco can be used in. So there is the simple answer, also the Fairy works (as does butter) in the Icing recipes (again from mums cookbook lol) so a direct sub can be done in those as well... Happy Cooking Folks...

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