Paint On Buttercream??

Decorating By KutieKakes Updated 9 Mar 2009 , 2:36am by KutieKakes

KutieKakes Posted 7 Mar 2009 , 6:29pm
post #1 of 9

Has anyone painted on buttercream? I love the leopard print and have done several myself, but have tried to paint directly on the buttercream. It turns out OK...but not great. Has anyone done this before and have a secret method? I usually use vanilla mixed with color. It tends to separate on the cake, which I'm sure is the buttercream. Unfortunately, I'm not charging enough to do fondant, and people love them because I keep getting orders for them. Anyway, just wondering if there is a better method than what I am using.
LL

8 replies
kakeladi Posted 7 Mar 2009 , 8:34pm
post #2 of 9

Haven't tried it yet.....just getting ready to. I have a feeling the results will be similar to what you concluded.

2girliesmama Posted 7 Mar 2009 , 8:53pm
post #3 of 9

Got your answer! When painting on fondant use clear alcohol or extract, but when painting on buttercream use 100% pure mineral oil. The knid you find in the drug store. IT MUST BE PURE!!!!MINERAL OIL. This works really well with gold luster dust which would be beautiful on a leopard cake! icon_biggrin.gif

KimAZ Posted 7 Mar 2009 , 9:00pm
post #4 of 9

Whenever I paint on buttercream, I just use luster dust mixed with lemon oil to make the paint and it works just great.

KimAZ

kakeladi Posted 8 Mar 2009 , 1:09am
post #5 of 9

Mineral oil will *NEVER!* dry. We will have to be extremely careful handling it icon_sad.gif

CakeDiva73 Posted 8 Mar 2009 , 1:30am
post #6 of 9

Whenever I have painted on buttercream, I have used vodka diluted airbrush or gel colors. It's always tricky since buttercream (even after crusting) is so darn delicate.

The Ed Hardy and Jack Skellington cakes were both painted BC with an overspray of airbrush..... I look forward to the day I can master fondant and then paint on that because it's so much easier.

Not sure what to say about the mineral oil thing - I didn't realize that was edible. My little palette gets a bit greasy as I am painting but it still seems to work okay. It's time consuming but fun.

2txmedics Posted 8 Mar 2009 , 2:22pm
post #7 of 9

I had asked and asked that question, and then someone and I dont know who sent me a reply and a how to...but yes it can be done...you just have to be very light handed with your brush, use vodka or lemon extract for it to dry....

I tried it and this was the best I could do...with my boxer dog. I wanted it to have those shaded tones....

The cake was a image I found on the net, the guy has 2 boxers, and I have the brother, and his father has 3 boxers. So it was perfect for him. I copied it, piped it in black gel...then I transfered it to the cake, filled it in with b/c...once it crusted I painted the shades. Not bad I guess for a first.
LL

2girliesmama Posted 8 Mar 2009 , 3:50pm
post #8 of 9

All I know is when I asked the busiest local bakery what they used, they said mineral oil. I tried it and it worked beautifully. I had no problems. I was not heavy handed with it though. I believe as long as you use an oil based product like mineral or lemon oil you will get better results on buttercream. Buttercream is so high in fat the the alcohol based products seperate off for me as well. Yes! in small amounts mineral oil is edible. Don't drink the bottle or anything, but for painting okay. It is in tons of products we use everyday.

KutieKakes Posted 9 Mar 2009 , 2:36am
post #9 of 9

WONDERFUL! Thanks everyone! You guys are awesome. I actually have another leopard cake this week I have to do, so I'm going to try the mineral oil or Lemon oil. THANKS! LOVE THIS SITE!

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