Freezing Filled Cakes...help!!!

Decorating By Normita Updated 5 Mar 2009 , 7:47am by Normita

Normita Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 5:18am
post #1 of 10

I have a cake I have to make on Thursday but I wanted to know if I bake the cake and fill it with a fruit filling (rasberry or strawberry) or with a chocolate filling can I freeze the cake and then take it out when I am ready to carve and frost?? I know I can do this with buttercream but I am not sure if fruit fillings or other fillings work. Thanks icon_smile.gif

9 replies
all4cake Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 5:45am
post #2 of 10

Carving a fruit/pudding/ganache filled cake may prove to be messy if it is filled the traditional (dammed) way....once you start carving, the dam will be compromised and the filling will begin to ooze out.

If you split it into thinner layers and spread a thin coat of filling (thin, like that found between petit fours) between the layers...the outside would get a bit on it but you should be able to remedy that issue with the crumb coat and subsequent coat of icing or fondant without oozing or bulging issues.

I've read on here where one CCer stacked layers, uniced. Then carved...then split, dammed, filled and reassembled the cake to prevent compromising the dam during the carving stage.

Normita Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 5:56am
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Carving a fruit/pudding/ganache filled cake may prove to be messy if it is filled the traditional (dammed) way....once you start carving, the dam will be compromised and the filling will begin to ooze out.

If you split it into thinner layers and spread a thin coat of filling (thin, like that found between petit fours) between the layers...the outside would get a bit on it but you should be able to remedy that issue with the crumb coat and subsequent coat of icing or fondant without oozing or bulging issues.

I've read on here where one CCer stacked layers, uniced. Then carved...then split, dammed, filled and reassembled the cake to prevent compromising the dam during the carving stage.





Thanks all4cake. Since the cake I am going to make on Thursday is to be a fondant cake. I want to make sure and carve the sides to remove any bulges prior to putting on the fondant. However, I have not had success with carving the bulge on a room tempertature cake since it just fell apart due to it being crummy. I want to see if it possible to carve the cake frozen to remove the excess bulges that arise after the cake has settled for a while. And the filling I wanted to use was a chocolate or fruit filling. Does this make sense?

step0nmi Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 6:02am
post #4 of 10

what kind of bulges? all4cake is right in all of the above. but, if you just have normal layers you should be able to fill your cake and frost it without seeing any bulges. could you describe?

all4cake Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 6:09am
post #5 of 10

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-395763-carved.html

If all you're wishing to do is freeze it in order to straight trim to remove the excess settled/bulging icing, I don't see why you wouldn't be able to do that.

I do have a suggestion on that though....After splitting and filling to crumb coat the cake and allow to rest at room temp for several hours or overnight before freezing to make sure the filling/cake actually settled. Seems like if it were filled then stuck in the freezer, the filling may sieze before settling then when brought to room temp, it would settle...just a thought...

Normita Posted 4 Mar 2009 , 1:40am
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by step0nmi

what kind of bulges? all4cake is right in all of the above. but, if you just have normal layers you should be able to fill your cake and frost it without seeing any bulges. could you describe?




StepOnmi and all4cake: I know that I am not making sense. But I purchased sugarshakes videos on both buttercream and fondant. And what she does is she fills her cakes with dam and all and then she covers it in a plastic bag for a few hours or overnight and lets it settle. Once removed from the bag, she then removes the excess bulging to make her sides nice and even to then crumb coat it and add fondant for smooth and even sides. Cakes seem to bulge at the sides when they settle after baking, therefore I want to make them nice and even before I add fondant. I had no success with that. My cake just fell apart when I attempted to remove the bulges after it settled (cake unfrozen). Can I bake the cake, let it settle over night then freeze it and trim (frozen cakes are easier to carve)...and after dam it and fill it??? Hope this makes sense

all4cake Posted 4 Mar 2009 , 1:49am
post #7 of 10

No, you made perfect sense and I responded to just that in my last post...

I would suggest though to...

bake it, split(if you're going to), dam, fill, crumb coat, allow to settle...several hours or overnight, freeze, trim the bulges...crumb coat again then subsequent coat of icing and/or fondant covering. The initial crumbcoat is to help retain moisture while it's settling....

Normita Posted 5 Mar 2009 , 5:28am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

No, you made perfect sense and I responded to just that in my last post...

I would suggest though to...

bake it, split(if you're going to), dam, fill, crumb coat, allow to settle...several hours or overnight, freeze, trim the bulges...crumb coat again then subsequent coat of icing and/or fondant covering. The initial crumbcoat is to help retain moisture while it's settling....




Thanks so much this really helped. I just hope my fruit still tastes good after it has been thawed icon_smile.gif

all4cake Posted 5 Mar 2009 , 5:34am
post #9 of 10

Ummmm...I reckon I should've asked for clarification....I did assume when you said you were either going to use chocolate or fruit filling...that it might be fruit filling and not fruit as filling.

oof...you're using fresh fruit as the filling?

You shouldn't have to freeze it solid ...so the fruit wouldn't actually have to thaw....you just need to freeze it long enough for the crumb coat/very outside of the cake to become frozen.

Normita Posted 5 Mar 2009 , 7:47am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Ummmm...I reckon I should've asked for clarification....I did assume when you said you were either going to use chocolate or fruit filling...that it might be fruit filling and not fruit as filling.

oof...you're using fresh fruit as the filling?

You shouldn't have to freeze it solid ...so the fruit wouldn't actually have to thaw....you just need to freeze it long enough for the crumb coat/very outside of the cake to become frozen.




Oooooh no...I am using fruit filling....not fresh fruit as filling =) Thank you so much for your suggestions they have been really helpfull

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