I've Never Been Successful ...

Decorating By Ayanami Updated 3 Mar 2009 , 6:02pm by Ayanami

Ayanami Posted 2 Mar 2009 , 8:02pm
post #1 of 12

I have tried a variety of ways to get an effective "marbleing" of white & chocolate cake mixes but I jsut can't seem to get it right.

What I consider a "marble" cake is where you have patches of random, uneven cake flavorings throughout the entire cake. Not just a line of one flavor making a skinny path thru the cake.

I am a box mix baker & I usually use Pils / BC / DH depends on whats on sale.

I have tried pouring one batter on top of the other, pouring the batters side by side & running a knife in swirling motions, dropping globs of batter randomly thru each other then swirling .....

The only time I got a really good marbled cake was when I did strawberry batter on bottom & poured chocolate batter directly on top. During baking, the soft fluffy strawberry rose up & around the heavier dense chocolate & the finished cake was a "perfect" (IMO) marble cake.

If that makes any sense to anyone & they know how I can achieve what I am wanting to do, I would greatly appreciate your input & advice.

TIA

11 replies
kakeladi Posted 2 Mar 2009 , 11:48pm
post #2 of 12

What I have sometimes done is to take the choco (dry) mix and mix it w/oil to a thick mud and drop it in the yellow batter then swirl it thru. Because the choco batter is much heavier it sinks and spreads little. Sounds like that is what you are going for?

j-pal Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 6:18am
post #3 of 12

I usually just do the dump and swirl with a knife thing, but one way you could try is to put about 1/2 of one flavor in the pan, then dump 1/2 of the other flavor and then 1/2 of the first flavor and then the last half. I've done this with certain flavors because I felt that when I leveled the cake after baking, that I was removing most of just the last flavor added. It's worth a try, maybe?

lostincake Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 6:34am
post #4 of 12

What I've done in the past is use a standard sized kitchen ladle and ladle the batter into the pan first side by side in one layer, then any remainder goes on top of the first layer with the alternate batter.

So rather than just dumping from the bowl where it's hard to control how much comes out, I get consistent amounts of batter and then of course use a knife to swirl through the entire pan at least twice.

This way there is even distribution of each flavour and they are significantly marbled - usually there are at least 6-8 ladlefuls of batter placed in a standard 9x3" round pan.

HTH.

lostincake Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 6:37am
post #5 of 12

Oh...need to clarify that I DO use a separate ladle for each type of batter being marbled so as not to make a huge big mess that ends up one colour. icon_biggrin.gif

Monkess Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 3:47pm
post #6 of 12

My approach is similar to vlin28-you cant really go wrong-i have on occassion used ice cream scoopers as well and the end result is a pan that looks like 2 coored dinner rolls! Then just take a knife and swirl away!

cakes22 Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 4:12pm
post #7 of 12

When I have done marble cakes, I usually put the most colour batter in the pan first (vanilla or yellow), then I randomly put in the chocolate batter either using a ladle or just glob it in using a spoon. Then I use a knife and "cut" the chocolate batter thru the yellow. I will go back and forth width wise than back and forth length wise. Then I drag the knife about 2 inches from each back to the edge. (make sense??? icon_eek.gif) I have gotten nice marbling effects that way.

HTH

Ayanami Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 4:58pm
post #8 of 12

Thank you everyone sooo much! thumbs_up.gif

It sounds like the glop-n-plop method is the most prefered. I will try this way again with a ladel this time. I think I failed at this method before b/c I was using a spoon. icon_redface.gif

THNK U! icon_biggrin.gif

aswartzw Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 5:03pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlin28

What I've done in the past is use a standard sized kitchen ladle and ladle the batter into the pan first side by side in one layer, then any remainder goes on top of the first layer with the alternate batter.

So rather than just dumping from the bowl where it's hard to control how much comes out, I get consistent amounts of batter and then of course use a knife to swirl through the entire pan at least twice.

This way there is even distribution of each flavour and they are significantly marbled - usually there are at least 6-8 ladlefuls of batter placed in a standard 9x3" round pan.

HTH.




Very interesting method! I normally plop and drag but I should try this instead.

butterfly831915 Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 5:08pm
post #10 of 12

I always wanted to know this too.

2girliesmama Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 5:47pm
post #11 of 12

The plop-n-drop works great (even with a big spoon) as long as one batter is a little thicker than the other. If they are the same consistancy blending and very little of the marbeling effect tends to occur.

Ayanami Posted 3 Mar 2009 , 6:02pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2girliesmama

The plop-n-drop works great (even with a big spoon) as long as one batter is a little thicker than the other. If they are the same consistancy blending and very little of the marbeling effect tends to occur.




Very good point. Thank you! My chocolate is usually thicker than my white anyway, so I hope that woun't be problem for me. icon_rolleyes.gif

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