Enough Cake?

Decorating By Madiken Updated 26 Feb 2009 , 1:31pm by indydebi

Madiken Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 8:50pm
post #1 of 17

I'm making a cake for a friend in a few weeks for her daughters birthday. She is having a princess themed party and wants the castle shaped pan. She is having 24 children at this party and some of the parents will probably stay. I suggested that I stack the castle shaped cake onto a 14 inch square cake to ensure she has enough cake. I think this should be plenty of cake if she has around 40 guests. She doesn't think the cake will feed everyone. Do you think this will be enough cake or is she right? I certainly don't want her to be short.

16 replies
kakeladi Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 9:07pm
post #2 of 17

It definitely will be enough - unless they are huge cake eaters!
You didn't say the age of the kids but......a 14" sq should yield 35-40 servings then the shaped cake another 15-20. That's based on a serving being 2x2x2".

alvarezmom Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 9:09pm
post #3 of 17

Well a half sheet of cake is 11 X 15 and that is supposed to feed 30-40ppl and a full sheet is 18 X 24 and that feeds 70-80ppl.

I think you will have more than enough cake to feed every one. I am always second guessing myself but I have learned it doesnt sound like allot of cake but it is!

I saw some one's signature and it read "Cut cake like a dessert not a main course"! SOO TRUE!!!

misabel99 Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 9:26pm
post #4 of 17

Yes you will have enough cake for 40 people thumbs_up.gif

Madiken Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 9:29pm
post #5 of 17

Thanks everyone! I figured so. The birthday girl is just turning 4 so most of those guests are pretty little as well.

indydebi Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 9:36pm
post #6 of 17

Small kids eat small pieces of cake. If they are cut bigger, it just ends up in the trash, wasted. At my grandchildren's parties, where the kids are 2 to 10, a 2x2x2 is perfect for the kids. Adults were fine with the size, too. most people have trouble visualizing a 1" or 2" piece of cake ... they think it's paper-thin ... and it's not.

a 14" square, cut in 2" pieces will be cut in 7 rows by 7 columns = 49 pieces. You'll be super fine.

kakeladi Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 12:42am
post #7 of 17

.............half sheet of cake is 11 X 15.... feed 30-40ppl and a full sheet is 18 X 24 and that feeds 70-80ppl.


So SORRY but this information is *NOT!* accurate.

If one matches the cake to the board & box sold for those size sheet cakes you would see that a 12x16 fits the 1/2 sheet board and a full sheet would need two of those side by side. A sheet cake is one layer 2" high. It is usually cut into 2x2x2 cubes.

indydebi Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 12:47am
post #8 of 17

kakeladi, a great example of why I won't use the terms "half" and "full"! thumbs_up.gif

CakeDiva70 Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 12:58am
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

kakeladi, a great example of why I won't use the terms "half" and "full"! thumbs_up.gif




Do you mind explaining this comment? I think I understand, but want to be sure. I am having trouble figuring out if I want to put on my website 1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet or full sheet or just say 13x9 (1/4 sheet). I am still not sure what size is a half sheet and what is a considered a full sheet. It seems people have difference in opinion, and I was hoping someone could explain.

indydebi Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 1:27am
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva70

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

kakeladi, a great example of why I won't use the terms "half" and "full"! thumbs_up.gif



Do you mind explaining this comment? I think I understand, but want to be sure. I am having trouble figuring out if I want to put on my website 1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet or full sheet or just say 13x9 (1/4 sheet). I am still not sure what size is a half sheet and what is a considered a full sheet. It seems people have difference in opinion, and I was hoping someone could explain.



Sure!

we have a lot of discussions on here, between people who live and breathe cakes, who can't agree or have different definitions of what a full and what a half sheet is.

So how do we expect the cake civilians of the world to know what the heck they are ordering?

When someone asks me "How much for a 1/2 sheet?", I will turn it around and ask them, "how big is that?" I swear to high heaven, they always say, "I dont' know."

So why are you asking a price for a cake that you've no idea how freakin' big or small it is??????? icon_eek.gif They use the terms because "it's what people say" ... not because they have any idea what size it is.

I had one guy ask me for a price on a full .... notice that word, FULL .... sheet cake. I asked "How many people are you planning on feeding?"

This guy, who works in the food industry, said, "Oh, about ten."

icon_eek.gif TEN???? I laughed and said, "Holy crap, why would you want a cake that feeds 100, then?"

They have no idea. So I just go by servings. You tell me how many people you need to feed and I'll tell you how big of a cake you need.

But don't walk in here and order a "full" sheet cake to feed 10 people, then complain because I "sold" you too much cake.

My sheet cake price list shows the dimensions of the cake and the expected number of servings ... 18 x 24 / serves 108 / 2x2x2" servings.

CakeDiva70 Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 1:45am
post #11 of 17

Thanks for taking the time to explain. I was thinking along the same lines. It's funny, because every where I research the number of servings and size are different. If you don't mind, could you please share your size and servings chart or just give me the sheet sizes and servings. It would really help me out..... and I really hope it does not turn into a debate, because this gourmet thread is too good for a debate....LOL icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 2:55am
post #12 of 17

In the true sense of our company philosophy, we keep it simple.

Sheet cakes are figured at 2x2x2.
Layered cakes are figured at 1x2x4. (Wilton chart).
http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm

how to cut a cake to achieve a wilton serving (I actually get about 10% more servings when cutting a cake this way).
http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page10.html

__Jamie__ Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 3:13am
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva70

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

kakeladi, a great example of why I won't use the terms "half" and "full"! thumbs_up.gif



Do you mind explaining this comment? I think I understand, but want to be sure. I am having trouble figuring out if I want to put on my website 1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet or full sheet or just say 13x9 (1/4 sheet). I am still not sure what size is a half sheet and what is a considered a full sheet. It seems people have difference in opinion, and I was hoping someone could explain.




icon_twisted.gif Annnnduuuh, one more reason that I no makie sheet cakes. icon_biggrin.gif

CakeDiva70 Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 12:00pm
post #14 of 17

Thanks for the charts.........very helpful.

dhccster Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 1:00pm
post #15 of 17

This is oood information to know! I'm new at this, but I have noticed a lot of people calling a 13x9 size pan a sheet cake--when I explain that's considered a 1/4 sheet cake, they tell me they've always thought it was "just a sheet cake!"

IcedTea4Me2 Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 1:22pm
post #16 of 17

I've been guilty of that. When I think "sheetcake" I think 13 X 9. I guess it's the standard size I ordered most often when my son was having his birthday parties.

Lisa

indydebi Posted 26 Feb 2009 , 1:31pm
post #17 of 17

It's a common thought ... because as cake civilians, we were not aware of where the terms came from and why they are called that. We lived in our own little 9x13 world and gave no thought to anything that MIGHT be larger than that.

Standard commercial bakery pans are (forgive me if I dont' have the dimensions right) approx 18x24. Cut it in half and you have a 12x18 .... ergo "half sheet". Etc.

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