Bc Covered Topsy-Turvy Cakes...

Decorating By sambugjoebear Updated 25 Feb 2009 , 2:12am by Rocketgirl899

sambugjoebear Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 5:13pm
post #1 of 28

Have you ever covered a topsy-turvy cake in BC and just decorated with fondant? I was wondering how well this would hold up if done that way. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!

27 replies
tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 5:32pm
post #2 of 28

I do it all the time..It works well!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 5:39pm
post #3 of 28

I've done them that way before. They work fine, just make sure they're chilled well before you move them!

tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 6:24pm
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I've done them that way before. They work fine, just make sure they're chilled well before you move them!




I wonder what buttercream you use..I never chill mine after they are finished..Specially if it's decorated with fondant.
Edna

sambugjoebear Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 6:40pm
post #5 of 28

Thanks for the replies icon_biggrin.gif I'm going to do a test run this weekend and see how it goes.

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 6:56pm
post #6 of 28

I use both the confectioner's sugar version and the meringues, depends on what the customer wants. The only time that I had a cake slide (not a topsy turvy one) it hadn't been refrigerated before I delivered it, and it was warm that day. If I deliver anything that's all in one piece now I refrigerate it so that it doesn't move around on me.

I don't have problems putting fondant in the fridge, sometimes they get a little damp when I take them out, but again, that's usually only when it's really hot and there's a big difference in humidity in and out of the fridge. I have a fondant-covered cake in there right now, actually. Since you're in Florida it would probably be a more noticeable change, it's pretty dry here now.

tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 7:00pm
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I use both the confectioner's sugar version and the meringues, depends on what the customer wants. The only time that I had a cake slide (not a topsy turvy one) it hadn't been refrigerated before I delivered it, and it was warm that day. If I deliver anything that's all in one piece now I refrigerate it so that it doesn't move around on me.

I don't have problems putting fondant in the fridge, sometimes they get a little damp when I take them out, but again, that's usually only when it's really hot and there's a big difference in humidity in and out of the fridge. I have a fondant-covered cake in there right now, actually. Since you're in Florida it would probably be a more noticeable change, it's pretty dry here now.




I use the regular 1/2 high ratio 1/2 butter recipe. I live in florida, it never slides. Is your icing on the thiner side? I hope you dont mind me asking, is just curiosity. icon_redface.gif
Edna

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 7:17pm
post #8 of 28

I don't mind at all...I just had that one bad experience with the shifting tiers, so I'm paranoid about the stacked cakes moving around. When I deliver three-tiered cakes I take them all in one piece, so I put those in the fridge, then they firm up enough that they don't move around. If I take anything over three tiers, I stack the two bottom tiers then assemble the rest on-site. I try to refrigerate those too, but if I have to leave them out they're usually fine being moved. It's when you get the three-tiered ones that aren't refrigerated that I get nervous about the shifting. They might be totally fine if I moved them, I just feel better if the icing isn't so soft when I move them.

As far as the fondant, when you first take it out of the fridge it will get sticky for a while, but it will dry out eventually. The humidity where I am isn't as bad as where you are, but we have some bad months in the summer when it's really sticky. That's the only time that I notice a lot of stickiness on the fondant that's been refrigerated. Other than that, it's not so bad.

I also heard that people refrigerate fondant cakes in boxes, and that keeps them from getting so sticky when you take them out.

tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 7:21pm
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I don't mind at all...I just had that one bad experience with the shifting tiers, so I'm paranoid about the stacked cakes moving around. When I deliver three-tiered cakes I take them all in one piece, so I put those in the fridge, then they firm up enough that they don't move around. If I take anything over three tiers, I stack the two bottom tiers then assemble the rest on-site. I try to refrigerate those too, but if I have to leave them out they're usually fine being moved. It's when you get the three-tiered ones that aren't refrigerated that I get nervous about the shifting. They might be totally fine if I moved them, I just feel better if the icing isn't so soft when I move them.

As far as the fondant, when you first take it out of the fridge it will get sticky for a while, but it will dry out eventually. The humidity where I am isn't as bad as where you are, but we have some bad months in the summer when it's really sticky. That's the only time that I notice a lot of stickiness on the fondant that's been refrigerated. Other than that, it's not so bad.

I also heard that people refrigerate fondant cakes in boxes, and that keeps them from getting so sticky when you take them out.


\\



lol..everybody does what works for them, is the beauty of this business. I work with so many weddings a week, I could even try to put them in the fridge, specially those 4 and five tiers. I was just asking cause is interesting how other people work in their kitchen!.. icon_rolleyes.gif
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 7:24pm
post #10 of 28

I have so much cake in my fridge there's no room for anything else! My husband once went and bought about 12 yogurts on a Friday and I went ballistic on him. He's only allowed to buy beer in a six pack at the beginning of the week, after Fridays it's one bottle at a time! icon_wink.gif

KHalstead Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 7:27pm
post #11 of 28

I've done all of my TT cakes in bc with fondant accents and I've never had any troubles with the fondant sticking, if the icing crusts for a while you can just brush the back of the fondant pieces with a little water to help them stick better. Now all I hope for with the TT cakes is that someone will order one in a different style instead of just different colors LOL
LL
LL
LL
LL

Rocketgirl899 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 7:59pm
post #12 of 28

would i be crazy to do this design in BC? how would i get the big white flower to stick? put it on a wire?
LL

stephaniescakenj Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 8:15pm
post #13 of 28

OH I love love love that cake! I've had that saved to my favs since the moment Sugarshack posted it. I'm just waiting for an occasion to make something like that... sorry no advice, just had to share icon_biggrin.gif
I bet if you PM her, she'll answer your questions. i remember her mentioning something about writing on her blog about how she did that cake too

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 8:17pm
post #14 of 28

I'd attach the flower to either a toothpick or something else that's food-safe then insert it into the cake. You could also do it on wires then stick it into the cake with a straw wrapped around it. Someone else (I can't remember, sorry) said in another post that they dip the wires of their gumpaste flowers in white chocolate before putting them into the cake.

Sometimes I also use the drink stirrers that are thin to make flowers on. They're food-safe and long, so if you have something that sticks onto the side of the cake like that, it will be anchored securely through the cake.

azeboi2005 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 8:32pm
post #15 of 28

when yal make a TT cake, what method do you use to form the tiers. i recently did one and i used the method in the tutorial here on cc. i baked three cakes 8-9-10'', torted and filled them like it said to do, placed in fridge to firm up. took them out carved, crumb coated, back into fridge. iced cake and decorated. it held up fine until it traveled, the top started to slide. i tried to secure it with bubble tea straws, but i think it was to late. luckily it didn't competly slide off. i was able to use a paper towel to fix the apprearance. i felt as though the bottom wasn't able to support the larger cake size up top.

please any help is appreciated, i'd hate for a paid cake to fall.

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 8:39pm
post #16 of 28

I do the three tiers, but I cut the hole in the center of the top to sit the next tier flat on it. The slanted edge on top wraps around the bottom of the tier that sits on it, so it's not really slanting, it just looks like it. See my notes above about being paranoid, doing it this way makes me feel much better about possible tier-slippage!

Rocketgirl899 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 9:06pm
post #17 of 28

stephaniescakenj-

I found the blog, the cake is done in fondant.. I don't mind doing in fondant, but really like BC better. I guess your right, Sharon is always so helpful... I could bug her again icon_biggrin.gif

Costumeczar
"another post that they dip the wires of their gumpaste flowers in white chocolate"

that's a great idea! I didn't even think about wires not being food safe... although where i use to work we (well not me i didn't decorate) would shove anything in a cake...

I will keep that in mind for this cake, as well as a topper I am making icon_biggrin.gif

KHalstead Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 9:09pm
post #18 of 28

I do the hole method as well like in the tutorial on CC......I think the trick is to dig out the hole deep enough, the black, white, and red one I did the top started to lean back during delivery but I was able to fix it pretty easily (the photo is after the mishap) now I know better.....I dig the hole about an inch deep on the down slanted side so it's definitely in there and not going anywhere. I travelled with all of these fully assembled included the 3 tier one which went up very steep windy hills, I put a couple central dowels in that one lol. When I stick wires in the cake I just stick a little tiny coffee stir straw in the cake and stick the wires inside of it then when they pull the straw out of the cake the little bit of "contaminated cake" that's inside of it comes out with the straw.

tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 9:37pm
post #19 of 28

Ok here is my last one....all buttercream, fondant swags!...they hold well, and 4 tiers..even the flowers on the high side where I cut the hole and added the swag hold whit no problem. My buttercream is not runny so that makes a big difference for me.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif
LL

tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 9:38pm
post #20 of 28

I wanted to add...this is the same one as in my avatar, except the one in my avatar was done in fondant. I was worried about the swags since they tend to be heavy, but the cake did well, and traveled well.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Rocketgirl899 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 10:22pm
post #21 of 28

So it is possible Edna!

What do you use to attach the fondant to the BC?

I use fondant glue (little water and fondant... ) just want to make sure i can use the best thing. Would you attempt the above blue sugarshack cake in BC?

If you would do it, then I would... if there is no way in heck you would try No amount of money would make me give it a shot!

Toptier Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 10:57pm
post #22 of 28

I did this topsy in imbc and placed a small piece of spaghetti in the back of each daisy. I was paranoid that they would slide off. Perhaps that could work for you...
Image

edited to say that my pic is not posting. It is the Enchanted garden one in my photos...http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1270433

tonedna Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 11:01pm
post #23 of 28

This one I have done in both fondant and buttercream.

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1156565

The flower had separate petals so it attached easily to the buttercream. I would definitevely do sugarshack on buttercream and her flower on wire. I attach my swags and flowers with some buttercream and flat details with gum glue.


Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Rocketgirl899 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 11:33pm
post #24 of 28

Toptier-- cute name! and cute cake icon_biggrin.gif great idea about spaghetti!

Edna! I love that cake... alright I am going to do Sugarshacks cake in BC (crosses fingers) I will try to remember to post here how it turns out!

What is gum glue? hm...

Do you just stick the floral wire in the cake? is that okay?

tonedna Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 12:18am
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocketgirl899

Toptier-- cute name! and cute cake icon_biggrin.gif great idea about spaghetti!

Edna! I love that cake... alright I am going to do Sugarshacks cake in BC (crosses fingers) I will try to remember to post here how it turns out!

What is gum glue? hm...

Do you just stick the floral wire in the cake? is that okay?




you can cover the wire in RI, white chocolate or a straws..Remeber not to use a too soft buttercream.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Rocketgirl899 Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 1:04am
post #26 of 28

awesome! Thanks. icon_smile.gif

wait so whats gum glue?

tonedna Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 2:07am
post #27 of 28

Some people use tylose and warm water, others dissolve gumpaste in warm water..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Rocketgirl899 Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 2:12am
post #28 of 28

thanks! so i was on the right track! thanks

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%