How To Torte A Sheet Cake??? Help

Decorating By colabear71 Updated 24 Feb 2009 , 8:43pm by BeeBoos-8599_

colabear71 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:44pm
post #1 of 17

I am making a full sheet cake for a customer. It is a german chocolate cake and they have requested it to have a middle layer of the pecan/coconut filling in it. I have never tried to torte a cake that large and need to know if it is possible and if so.... any suggestions to make it successful.

Thanks in advance,

Kim

16 replies
whisperingmadcow Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:55pm
post #2 of 17

I have never done it myself, but I was reading a post on here that said something about freezing the cake first then making the needed cut. That way its easier to work with.

Also, I know wilton makes a large cake saw (for torting) for sheet cakes. You might want to look into that too...

Good Luck!

BCJean Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:55pm
post #3 of 17

When I torte a cake, I cut in about 1inch all around the cake....then I continue turning the cake and going in about 2inches each time, until you have sliced completely through the cake. Going all around the cake keeps the slice even through the entire cake.

Valli_War Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:58pm
post #4 of 17

I am no expert, but sharing my experience. I torted a 15 X 10 sheet cake once. I don't have big leveler. Just the small one. Since I don't do this for money, I didn't want to buy the big one. I used the small one to cut the sides as far as they could go - all the four sides. Then, took the floss and put it through the slots that I had made and pulled them together. It torted the sheet without any problems. Make sure you put the cake in the freezer for some time so that it doesn't go all crumbly.

Eme Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 8:02pm
post #5 of 17

I found out the hard way that torting a sheet cake is nearly impossible without having something major go wrong (layer breaking apart). The saw-like cake leveler wilton has doesn't work well at all. What I ended up doing was to simply bake 2 layers separately. I use about 1/2 the recipe in each, wrap with the bake-even strips, cut down on baking time, trim up the top just a little, and get great results each time. The layers are sturdier than if they are cut, but still put them in the fridge for a few hours to firm up.

HTH

colabear71 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 8:03pm
post #6 of 17

I do have the larger wilton leveler, as I am more of a hobbiest and can't afford the more expensive one (agbay I believe?). My main question is how to seperate the levels afterwards, without them cracking or breaking?? I had that happen with just a 13 x 9 cake and this is much larger, so I am nervous about the cracking issue.

Any suggestions?

Eme..thanks for the suggestion. It came up while I was typing, hence the edit. I didn't think of just baking 2 layers, with half the batter.

This is why I love CC....so many wonderful people that are willing to help and share their experiences icon_biggrin.gif

Valli_War Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 8:07pm
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by colabear71

I do have the larger wilton leveler, as I am more of a hobbiest and can't afford the more expensive one (agbay I believe?). My main question is how to seperate the levels afterwards, without them cracking or breaking?? I had that happen with just a 13 x 9 cake and this is much larger, so I am nervous about the cracking issue.

Any suggestions?


\\

For this, use a cookie sheet large enough to hold the layer which doesn't have lip on one side. Slide it carefully under the torted layer and put it in the freezer for 15 minutes to firm up. By that time, you can fill the layer and replace the top one back. It slides back on to the cake without problem.

BCJean Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 8:08pm
post #8 of 17

After you have sliced the cake...take a full sheet cake board and slide it between the slices...lift the top layer off...fill...slide the top back on starting with the far edge of the cake. Just line the cake up and pull the board out as the cake slides into place. I torte at least 5 full sheets every week. No need to freeze the cake.

eldag0615 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 8:15pm
post #9 of 17

Same as BC Jean , no problems

bashini Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 10:19pm
post #10 of 17
Bethkay Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 1:05am
post #11 of 17

I make sheet cake layers by baking each layer seperately in sheet pans, and then stacking the individual sheet cakes. My cakes are fairly firm, so this method works well for me without having to worry about a lot of tearing.

I agree with all the others--placing the cakes in the freezer for a short while also helps in the handling process.

Bethkay Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 1:07am
post #12 of 17

I make sheet cake layers by baking each layer seperately in sheet pans, and then stacking the individual sheet cakes. My cakes are fairly firm, so this method works well for me without having to worry about a lot of tearing.

I agree with all the others--placing the cakes in the freezer for a short while also helps in the handling process.

kakeladi Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 2:36am
post #13 of 17

If you just can't handle torting those lg cakes use the injueciton methodicon_smile.gif
You must have a smooth filling - no seeds or lumps of any kind.
Fill a pastry bag fitted w/a tip 6 (or similar). Push the tip into the cake & squeeze; One good squeeze is all that's needed - don't over do iticon_smile.gif do this about every 2". When finished, put a board on the cake and gently push it down some to even out the filling.

want2bcupcakequeen Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 2:44am
post #14 of 17

Bashini - thank you for the video!

bashini Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 10:23am
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by want2bcupcakequeen

Bashini - thank you for the video!




You are welcome. icon_smile.gif

colabear71 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 4:11pm
post #16 of 17

Thank you everyone for you suggestions. I am baking my cake today, so I will let you know if it all turns out well.

Bashini...thanks for the video clip. It's nice to see a visual sometimes to help.

Kim

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 8:43pm
post #17 of 17

Gee, I wish that someone had taken the time to respond to the 2 seperate times I posted the same question last week. I torted 2 half sheet cakes last week and alternated the flavors (red velvet and dark chocolate). I froze the cakes for a short time on a cookie sheet with parchment on it. I used my small wilton leveler. When I did try to use my large wilton leveler I found that it flexed to much and made for uneven areas in the cake. The cakes I made were from scratch and were pretty dense. I still had some crumbling but I put them back in the freezer for a bit longer after I sliced them then found that the crumbs brushed off easily. Even though they were not prefectly even, once the d icing (i used cream cheese butter cream) was in place they looked really pretty when cut. I think I gave out more business cards at this party than ever.

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