Cake And Cookie Decorating Class For Teens

Baking By luv2bake6 Updated 25 Feb 2009 , 12:36pm by GeminiRJ

luv2bake6 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:23am
post #1 of 12

I have been asked to do this for the summer.
While i am good with my hands in the comfort of my own home and on my own time, i'm a terrible planner and organizer.
I would live to hear from any of you about what you would do to fill about 2-3 hours, 1-2 times a week. And what would i charge?
I am not the type of person to put a class together and then just 'figure it out' as it comes along. I need to have things planned out to the 't' so i don't get stressed and the kids don't have downtime. After i have it planned out, i can then advertise.
Any help would be appreciated.
While i asked about decorating or baking for teens (ages 11-16), it would be great to hear ideas for younger ages as well. I may want to hold Sunday classes for various ages.

11 replies
luv2bake6 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 1:49am
post #2 of 12

Just bumping this up as i'd love to hear suggestions. Thanks so much!!

tastyart Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 5:31am
post #3 of 12

I'm so sorry there have been no responses to your question. I have never taken a class on cake decorating myself. I'm sure someone who has would have more valuable advice. I have, however, taught art to children. Based on that experience, having your project planned out and your materials ready is the most important thing. For elementary aged children, the projects usually took twice to three times as long for them to do with instruction, as me to do it by myself. I'm sure you will pick up very quickly on the length of project to plan. HTH

twooten173 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 5:49am
post #4 of 12

I haven't had a class with teens but I did let about 20 of them (13-1icon_cool.gif decorate cupcakes one year for about an 1.5 hours. I started off by by showing them the different types of icing (thick - thin, royal, etc), showed them how to prepare and fill the bag, then just show them some techniques and have them practice. Because they were using cupcakes, they got to do several of them. Keep in mind with a bunch of kids, you won't get through too much.

dhccster Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 5:58am
post #5 of 12

I just did this for my daughter's birthday party. Like twooten173, I had cupcakes for them to decorate. Because they are a little older-- maybe you could do 2 six inch cakes for each one. You could also get each child the cupcake decorating kit so they could have something to take home. I think it is about $7.00. I have been asked to do this with a Girl Scout troop, so it would be nice to hear what others who have taught a class suggest!

GeminiRJ Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:11pm
post #6 of 12

I've been asked to do a cookie decorating class in the fall, and I've got some ideas started. I think they'd work for teens, as well.

Your first class could be all on how to mix the dough, roll it, and get the cut-outs to the cookie sheets for baking. There are all kinds of hints and tips to pass along at this time. I would have handouts of various cookie recipes to give to each student. You can then give them "homework" of baking the cookies and bringing some to the next class.

For the next class, I would have some example cookies already decorated. (Visuals are always appreciated!) Show them how to mix up the icing you will be using, or maybe have different types available. Start with simple decorating techniques and have the students practice them on their cookies.

Depending on the number of classes scheduled, you could explore different ways to decorated a cookie using fondant, sanding sugars, rolled buttercream, etc. You could do one class on cookie bouquets. You could concentrate on different holiday cookies. You could do a class on using molds to make chocolate covered Oreos.

The pricing issue is something I haven't a clue on how to advise you. I was told I could charge $45 per student for the classes I will be teaching, but that will probably include my 3D cookie cutter kit. Check what the cake decorating classes in your area run. Maybe check to see if something similar is offered at a local community college?

Good luck!

luv2bake6 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:32pm
post #7 of 12

Wow, thank you for all your suggestions. I think this is a pretty neat topic since there are so many talented people here to share their ideas.
I chose to ask about teens (ages 11-15) cuz during the summer, it's this age girls that don't have much to do. Parents can't afford sleepaway camp, too old for daycamp, and too young to be counselors.
I was looking to see if there is enough to entertain this agegroup for the whole summer having 1-2 classes a week or more if need be. The girls this age have all pretty much had experience with rolling out doughs etc as they've done it in school throughout the years. They probably need more sophisticated types of activities like decorating the cookies with various icings and fondants and colors.........etc.
I just find it hard to take one idea and fill a class worth's time (i'm guessing about 3 hours per class).
Also, if i were to concentrate on a class teaching cookie bouquets, how would i break it up in order for the class to be efficient? I guess i'd start with the actual baking and showing how to put in the sticks, etc. The next class i guess could be decorating the cookies. The following class could be assemly but i'm not sure that will take much time. Any ideas?

GeminiRJ Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 7:45pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2bake6

Also, if i were to concentrate on a class teaching cookie bouquets, how would i break it up in order for the class to be efficient? I guess i'd start with the actual baking and showing how to put in the sticks, etc. The next class i guess could be decorating the cookies. The following class could be assemly but i'm not sure that will take much time. Any ideas?




I would devote the first class to baking the cookies, discussing different recipes and what to look for in a suitable recipe for this type of cookie. There are a variety of methods to putting in the sticks. Before baking, after baking while the cookie is still hot, after baking using melted chocolate or RI as a glue, after decorating and placing in clear bags (the stick is attached to the bag). Discuss different types of containers that can be used...the choices are endless...coffee cups, new paint cans, terra cotta pots, clean tin cans. (You could probably have one class just on decorating or painting the container). Discuss ways to weight the container, if necessary, to keep it from tipping over.

The second class could be the actual decorating of the cookies. Then, have a class that finishes the bouquets. Show them how to camoflauge the floral foam in the container with tissue paper. Give tips on the actual arrangement (tall cookies in back, short ones in front...an odd number of cookies often looking better than an even number...though not always).

Instead of containers, use a decorated cake. The decorating of the cake would be a whole class by itself!

Have fun!

luv2bake6 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 8:47pm
post #9 of 12

What do you mean about having a decorated cake instead of containers?
What ARE the different weights used to weight down a light container/
Thanks for your help. This is a great idea.

GeminiRJ Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 12:53pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2bake6

What do you mean about having a decorated cake instead of containers?
What ARE the different weights used to weight down a light container/
Thanks for your help. This is a great idea.




If the container is very lightweight, it will have a tendency to tip once all the cookies are added. Some people fill part of the container with marbles, candy, or dry beans to help stabilize it. I've usually not had this problem, as I've only used terra cotta pots and coffee mugs. I also have only done fairly small bouquets, which helps.

As for the cake instead of a container...I've done quite a few cakes that I cover in BC basketweave, then push cookies on a stick into the cake. I have a number of them in my photos. I'll try to attach one here.
LL

luv2bake6 Posted 24 Feb 2009 , 10:48pm
post #11 of 12

Wow!! What a great idea! That can add another class in itself just to decorate the cakes. Do you ever have a problem with the cookies tipping when inserted into the cake?
Your pic is beautiful.

GeminiRJ Posted 25 Feb 2009 , 12:36pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2bake6

Wow!! What a great idea! That can add another class in itself just to decorate the cakes. Do you ever have a problem with the cookies tipping when inserted into the cake?
Your pic is beautiful.




I haven't had a problem with the cookies tipping. Maybe if the cake had to be transported a good distance they would, but I don't think it would be a major problem. You could easily add the cookies once you get to your destination, too, and that would eliminate that worry!

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