Foam Board Between Cake Layers

Decorating By aundrea Updated 21 Apr 2014 , 4:03am by maybenot

aundrea Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:09am
post #1 of 40

i am stacking a cake and want to use foam board between the cake layers. to give my cake more stability.
my question is do i or should i cover the foam board. and if so with what?
i usually use the wilton cake boards but i have to travel with this cake tomorrow and want to make sure it doesnt implode.
when i use the wilton cake boards i cover with fanci foil. should i do the same for the foam board. i thought of fondant but think that might be too heavy.
i have a hexagon base cake topped with a round cake.
it will be a princess castle cake.
thanks in advance for advice!
darlene

39 replies
Rocketgirl899 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:17am
post #2 of 40

i glue a piece of wax paper between the layers..... using elmers non toxic glue... just a few dots then put the cake on top....

i am sure there are a million ways to do it.. you could also just spread a thin layer of BC on it... as sugarshack does

aundrea Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:21am
post #3 of 40

never thought about wax paper! great idea!!!
im just trying to avoid the foam board getting soggy and drooping.
and i hate the bulkiness of fanci foil!!
thank you!

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:23am
post #4 of 40

No, you don't need to cover the foam core (or any other board, for that matter) that you put between the layers of cake. I wipe mine down with vanilla (the alcohol in it sanitizes) before putting the cake layer on it.

If you're using foamcore for the decorative base board, you can cover it with fancy foil, fondant, scrapbook paper covered with clear contact paper, etc.

I always put my bottom tier on a piece of foamcore cut to the exact size of the tier so that there's a barrier between it and the contact paper, etc. Food shouldn't come in direct contact with colored contact papers because the colors have lead in them.

HTH
Rae

aundrea Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:34am
post #5 of 40

oh so you dont have anything on the foam core? and it doenst get soggy or droopy?
i just cut a piece of parchment paper and attached it with some RI.
i didnt have non-toxic glue in the house.
i think im ok with the bottom layer, im just trying to elimate the bulkiness of fanci foil on the stacked layers.
when you wipe down with vanilla it doesnt get soggy?

tdybear1978 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:41am
post #6 of 40

I use foamcore on all of my wedding cakes and I do NOT cover them with anythind and I have never had a problem with any soggy or drooping icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:42am
post #7 of 40

No, it doesn't get soggy at all. As a matter of fact, when I cut cakes, even dragging the knife across it barely mars the surface.

My parchment has a silicone finish, so it would worry me that it would be too slippery to hold the cake in place. icon_surprised.gif

Rae

aundrea Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 2:33am
post #8 of 40

yes that is what im thinking.......now. it feels kinda slippery. ugh!
i didnt think the foam core would hold up to the frosting.
this cake is for my grandaughters party tomorrow so i have time to start over again.
i already know this will be an all nighter. haha.
so if any of you are up tonight, ill be here checking in.
thanks again for all your suggestions.

tammi Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 2:46am
post #9 of 40

Hello everyone,

I just wanted to add to this discussion because I purchased a cake decorating video from Sharon Zambito. She uses foamcore boards for stacking and in the video she mentioned that foamcore boards aren't food safe, so she covers them front and back with Glad press and seal to make them foodsafe.

Thanks
Tamara

JaimeAnn Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 2:50am
post #10 of 40

I don't cover the foam core board with anything Either. Like BlakesCakes
I also wipe the board down with vanilla or vodka to sanitize the board. I have never had a board get soggy or droopy . In fact that is the only way I do a stacked cake it is a lot sturdier than the Wilton boards.

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 3:00am
post #11 of 40

I learned to use foamcore boards from Colette Peters. She's been using them for years. She doesn't cover them.

I don't cover them because of the concern that bits of saran, press & seal, foil, etc. will be torn away when the cake is cut and become imbedded in the cake slices.

I have never found any information or evidence that foamcore isn't safe to have food put on it. The paper coating is strong and very moisture resistant.

In the same vein, I highly doubt that the computer paper (used by Ms. Zambito) or foam rollers recommended for smoothing buttercream are certified as foodsafe, either.

Rae

scelin Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:08am
post #12 of 40

I am so happy I saw this forum. Thank you everybody for your info. I also have the stack dvd with the foamcore method. I was kind of worry when she said that it had to be cover with plastic wrap. I was not sure if the board will still be level after I do that. Also, I was worry about pieces of plastic wrap on the cake slices. Actually, I was kind of sad because she used dummie cakes instead of real cakes in this dvd. I love C. Peter's work, but I can't afford her classes yet. I am glad I can learn something from her thru you. I will feel better now that I can buy them and use them directly to the cake. I can't wait to practice. Thanks. thumbs_up.gif

Rocketgirl899 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:21am
post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by tammi

Hello everyone,

I just wanted to add to this discussion because I purchased a cake decorating video from Sharon Zambito. She uses foamcore boards for stacking and in the video she mentioned that foamcore boards aren't food safe, so she covers them front and back with Glad press and seal to make them foodsafe.

Thanks
Tamara




i have her DVDs... and have watched them oh 3-4 times...when did i miss her saying that?! lol...

scelin Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:35am
post #14 of 40

She doesn't say the brand. I saw it more than 1 time too. She doesn't use it or tell you how to do it. She just said cover it with "self sticking plastic wrap". That's why I said I wish she used real cake instead of dummies.

newnancy Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:37am
post #15 of 40

What thickness do you use between tiers? I've seen these at Michael's & wasn't sure if I was looking at the right thing. Do they have something written on them or anything to make sure I get the right thing? Any help is appreciated greatly. THANKS

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:42am
post #16 of 40

I use 3/16th (the thin ones) between layers. You can usually get those on sale at Michael's for about $1/sheet. I often cut the thicker, 1/2 inch for decorative base boards.

Rae

newnancy Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 12:42pm
post #17 of 40

Thanks Rae! I'll give these a try.....sounds better than using cardboard.

Rocketgirl899 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 5:20pm
post #18 of 40

Scelin... oh maybe i hear that. Oh well icon_smile.gif


Newnancy... I use 1/2 inch thick board. I pay a little less than $9 for a 30*40 inch board. I get mine at Sam Flax, and art store in orlando.

I have seen similar at Michaels, but already had mine so I didn't buy any. Mine doesn't have anything but white paper on both sides. Make sure you get a great exacto knife and lots of shape blades, you will need them, and it will make cutting so much easier.

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 7:09pm
post #19 of 40

I find that the 1/2 board is just too exensive to do for every tier (runs about $6-7/sheet at Michaels), unless I really have to add so much height to something, and that's why I only use it for fancy base boards. The 3/16th is very strong and holds even tall tiers well. It's nearly impossible to bend or bow.

I cut all of mine with a "hot knife" from Creative Marks. It's an electrified exacto knife and it cuts foam core like butter. You can find it online, Joanns, and Michaels.

HTH
Rae

Justbeck101 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 7:33pm
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I find that the 1/2 board is just too exensive to do for every tier (runs about $6-7/sheet at Michaels), unless I really have to add so much height to something, and that's why I only use it for fancy base boards. The 3/16th is very strong and holds even tall tiers well. It's nearly impossible to bend or bow.

I cut all of mine with a "hot knife" from Creative Marks. It's an electrified exacto knife and it cuts foam core like butter. You can find it online, Joanns, and Michaels.

HTH
Rae








Here is a link to buy sturdyboard, I got this from Sharon's Blog
http://www.artsupply.com/foamcore/sturdyboard.htm

I bought a box and I thought it was a pretty good price, and it is nice to have them when I need them.

Deb_ Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 7:54pm
post #21 of 40

When you all speak of "foamcore" boards from Michael's are you talking about the white poster board type thing with foam in the middle that are found in the art section of the store?

If you are, how are these food safe? These are sold for art projects not baking or food projects. I'd definitely be hesitant to place a cake directly on top of these if this is indeed what you mean.

I only use boards from our bakery supply wholesaler. Same goes for boxes.

Rocketgirl899 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 8:28pm
post #22 of 40

dkelly... yep thats what we are talking about.

i just charge $1 per 12 inch circles and it covers my cost... even if its 6 inches.. i still charge $1. 13inchs would be $2. then I buy a foiled cake drum for the base.

Deb_ Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 8:50pm
post #23 of 40

If these "foamcore" boards are sold for art projects then they are not food safe. I mean, they place them in a rack unwrapped for all to put their hands on. Who knows how many germs these things have come in contact with before you place your cakes on them.

The health dept would have a field day with that during an inspection.

If you buy food safe cake boards from bakery wholesalers, (I'm not talking about Wilton from Michael's) you will have a secure safe board.

I would rethink using these "foamcore" boards especially for those of you placing the cake directly on top of them. Cost aside, that's not what I'm concerned with, it's not food safe. Did I say that enough? icon_rolleyes.gificon_razz.gificon_lol.gif

Justbeck101 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 12:34am
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

If these "foamcore" boards are sold for art projects then they are not food safe. I mean, they place them in a rack unwrapped for all to put their hands on. Who knows how many germs these things have come in contact with before you place your cakes on them.

The health dept would have a field day with that during an inspection.

If you buy food safe cake boards from bakery wholesalers, (I'm not talking about Wilton from Michael's) you will have a secure safe board.

I would rethink using these "foamcore" boards especially for those of you placing the cake directly on top of them. Cost aside, that's not what I'm concerned with, it's not food safe. Did I say that enough? icon_rolleyes.gificon_razz.gificon_lol.gif




They can be purchased wholesale

aundrea Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 1:29am
post #25 of 40

Now I'm even more confused about this. I did put parchment paper around the foam core. It held up fine. So if foam core is not food safe then what alternatives r there besides wilton cake boards? Thanks again. This is very informative.

Justbeck101 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 3:51am
post #26 of 40

I cover my boards with contact paper. It is food safe. Con-Tact®Brand is food safe. I cut one shape the size of the board and one 2 inches bigger (I just use a larger pan and cut around it with my xacto). I place the larger cut contact on first then I place the same size one on the opposite side, it covers all the parts from bringing the opposite side over. Makes it look nicer, even though no one really looks at them. Of course I would look, so that is why I do it that way.

BlakesCakes Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 4:58am
post #27 of 40

I have e-mailed the company that makes Contact paper regarding placing food directly on any type of Contact paper. Their response was clear and definitive:
No type of Contact paper is considered food safe. They are adamant about this fact.

Food (especially greasy or acidic foods) should not be placed directly on clear Contact paper for any length of time. Food should NEVER be placed directly on colored contact papers because of the lead in the colors.

Contact paper contains phthalates that keep it flexible. Recent concerns about the ingestion of phthalates (particularly with baby teething rings & toys) is the reason to not have prolonged direct touching of food with the contact paper--the grease & acids can accelerate the leaching of the phthalates into the food. No, no one will get immediately ill, but it is a documented concern.

More than likely, because there are many manufacturers of foam core, there is currently no documentation of it's being food safe, or not, that I've been able to find. I sanitize it and find it to be quite inert. Foods are exposed to many types of paper all of the time--napkins, paper bags, newspaper (think fish & chips), non-wax coated cake boards, etc. My DH is an epidemiologist/MD and has no issue with my using foam core in my cakes.

I've purchased from arsupply.com--wonderful company. Their prices for 3/16 are a bit high (over $2/sheet with shipping), but they can't be beat for 1/2 inch.

To each his own.
Rae

Justbeck101 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 12:54pm
post #28 of 40

Really? From everything I have read I thought it was food safe. I have contacted the company and am awaiting a reply.

Deb_ Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 1:46pm
post #29 of 40

It just seems like you all are adding a lot of unnecessary expense and work to your cakes just to avoid the Wilton cake circles/boards, that are flimsy and awful.

If you buy from a Baker's wholesale company the cake circles/boards are a different gauge. They are definitely food safe, so there's no question concerning the safety of it, and they are strong.

If you want even more stability you can buy the plastic plates, which again would save you the time of cutting out circles or different shapes to cover your foamcore board.

If there is any doubt about the safety of an item I'd be concerned with using it. If foamcore board were food safe then wouldn't the bakery suppliers sell it too?

I'm fortunate to have a wholesaler only 15 minutes from my house, if you don't I know others here on CC have posted sites of on-line suppliers. In the long run when you buy in bulk you will save $$ not to mention the piece of mind you gain from knowing that you are using foodsafe items.

I cringe when I see the "big guys" on TV placing cakes in just any old box. I know we can't control what they do, but I feel better knowing that every cake I sell leaves in a foodsafe box on foodsafe boards.

Justbeck101 Posted 23 Feb 2009 , 4:53pm
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I have e-mailed the company that makes Contact paper regarding placing food directly on any type of Contact paper. Their response was clear and definitive:
No type of Contact paper is considered food safe. They are adamant about this fact.

Food (especially greasy or acidic foods) should not be placed directly on clear Contact paper for any length of time. Food should NEVER be placed directly on colored contact papers because of the lead in the colors.

Contact paper contains phthalates that keep it flexible. Recent concerns about the ingestion of phthalates (particularly with baby teething rings & toys) is the reason to not have prolonged direct touching of food with the contact paper--the grease & acids can accelerate the leaching of the phthalates into the food. No, no one will get immediately ill, but it is a documented concern.

More than likely, because there are many manufacturers of foam core, there is currently no documentation of it's being food safe, or not, that I've been able to find. I sanitize it and find it to be quite inert. Foods are exposed to many types of paper all of the time--napkins, paper bags, newspaper (think fish & chips), non-wax coated cake boards, etc. My DH is an epidemiologist/MD and has no issue with my using foam core in my cakes.

I've purchased from arsupply.com--wonderful company. Their prices for 3/16 are a bit high (over $2/sheet with shipping), but they can't be beat for 1/2 inch.

To each his own.
Rae




I just got off the phone with customer service for the shelf liner and they said there are not carcinogens in their product. She stated that they were safe to place cakes on as far as she knew.

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