Cracking Cake

Decorating By kinicto Updated 22 Feb 2009 , 3:19am by indydebi

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kinicto Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:02am
post #1 of 7

I just pulled a 10 inch cake out of the oven and noticed the cake is cracked all the way up the side. The only thing I can think of is that the flower nail I used for the heating core caused this when I pushed it back into the middle before placing the cake in the oven to bake.

Any ideas??

6 replies
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indydebi Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 1:17am
post #2 of 7

what do you mean when you pushed it "back" into the middle before you baked it?

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kinicto Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 2:34am
post #3 of 7

When I greased the pan, I put the flower nails in the middle of the pan. When I filled the pan with cake mix, the mix moved the nails to the sides of the pan. I pushed the nails back to the middle of the pan after adding the cake mix.

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moxey2000 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 2:40am
post #4 of 7

I don't think a flower nail or heating core is necessary for a 10" cake. I don't even use them on my 12" cake, I just bake them @ 325F with the rack in the center of the oven. It takes a little longer though.

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indydebi Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 2:54am
post #5 of 7

oh, I see what you mean now. I'm not sure how that would cause cracking in a cake, though.

If I recall correctly, cracks in a cake indicates overbaking or the temp is too high. If the recipe says to bake at 350, then bake at 325.

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enoid Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 3:13am
post #6 of 7

I'm still new to this. Why do you bake at a lower temp than recommended in the recipe?

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indydebi Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 3:19am
post #7 of 7

Because the temp on the recipe wasn't working for me. So I fixed it. icon_biggrin.gif

I'm a "until it looks right" cook. I rarely follow recipes ... I used them as a guideline. "Bake at 350 for 30 minutes" is a suggestion and a guideline, not a hard-fast rule.

When a cake is too dry, or cracks, or has hard edges, then it's been exposed to too much heat ... either via a too-high temp or baking too long. When I reduced the oven temp, the cakes came out MUCH better.

(True story: years and years ago, my dad commented that he liked my cookies because they were soft and asked how I did it. I said, "I dont' bake them as long." My mom said, "Well the recipe says to bake them 10 minutes so I do." I said (long before Dr. Phil said it, by the way!), "So how's that working for ya?" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif )

If you browse the threads on here, you'll find this a common piece of advice .... lower the oven temp.

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