Question For Storefront Owners? Range???

Business By babeebk Updated 4 Feb 2010 , 10:04pm by surgery2

babeebk Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 6:34pm
post #1 of 14

As I'm trying to pull together this list of necessary kitchen equipment, I realize that I may need a stove top for things like boiling water or making SMBC. I never had to think of this at home as I have a typical stove/oven range, but what about in the bake shop? I can't get by with just the convection oven.

Would it be okay to use a two burner hotplate (like the one I used to use in my college dorm room, lol) or do I need a range too?

What do you all use?

13 replies
tdybear1978 Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 6:45pm
post #2 of 14

I actually just bought a 2 burner range a few months ago. It was kind of pricey as I needed it to be a stronger wattage then the one I could just buy at wal-mart but also keep in mind that it still needs to be NSF approved. I found mine thru a local commercial equipment supplier

snarkybaker Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:13pm
post #3 of 14

I got a two burner induction range ( commercial) for about $850. I also have a six burner range that I bought new for $750. Commercial ranges are pretty cheap, so if you have the space, get one. A cooktop can be limiting, but it does tuck away and give you more space if you need it.

littlesweetpea Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:15pm
post #4 of 14

I don't know about where you are, but be sure to check with your local fire dept. codes. Here in WI any burner/range must have a hood. This includes a hot plate. I know-what?!?! But when we moved, we found out it would cost $10,000 to put in all the necessary "stuff" for our hood. We decided for what little I use the range, I would just use a hotplate. As long as the health & fire depts. don't catch you. You're required to have a hood even for a hotplate! They had changed the fire codes for this in the last couple of years. We couldn't get over it. But you don't want to be fined, or worse yet-shutdown.

littlesweetpea Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:17pm
post #5 of 14

I don't know about where you are, but be sure to check with your local fire dept. codes. Here in WI any burner/range must have a hood. This includes a hot plate. I know-what?!?! But when we moved, we found out it would cost $10,000 to put in all the necessary "stuff" for our hood. We decided for what little I use the range, I would just use a hotplate. As long as the health & fire depts. don't catch you. You're required to have a hood even for a hotplate! They had changed the fire codes for this in the last couple of years. We couldn't get over it. But you don't want to be fined, or worse yet-shutdown.

chutzpah Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:20pm
post #6 of 14

I don't have a stove-top. I never even considered it as I don't do cooking, and it would be a waste of countertop space in my bakery. I have a heavy-duty hot plate which I use in case I need to boil something, or for SMBC. I store it on a shelf and just take it down when needed.

Chef_Stef Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 5:15am
post #7 of 14

We're doing a convection gas separate oven and a standard four-burner gas non-convec range oven, because I use the stove top all the time for IMBC, double boiler, homemade puddings, mousses, simple syrup, etc.

We don't have to have commercial grade appliances here in ID, no idea why but I'm not questioning it!, and our buildout will include whatever I need, so we're making the builder deal with any venting. Haven't heard what, exactly, that will entail. Yet.

cakesweetiecake Posted 31 Jan 2010 , 4:33pm
post #8 of 14

Great thread. I had questions about cpmmercial grade hotplates and found the answers here!!

indydebi Posted 31 Jan 2010 , 4:47pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlesweetpea

I would just use a hotplate. As long as the health & fire depts. don't catch you.



Another concern would be your insurance coverage. My kitchen designer told me the true story of one of her clients. She was hired to do a remodel for them. When the kitchen was originally put together, the shop owner bought a household microwave instead of a comm'l grade microwave. There was a fire, in which the microwave was not involved at all.

Please note: The microwave had NOTHING to do with the fire.

The insurance company found out there was a non-commercial, non NSF approved piece of equipment in the kitchen and denied the ENTIRE claim.

I'm just always leary of the "anything's ok until you get caught" advice. Please don't put your entire financial life in jeopardy by trying to skirt the legal requirements.

Mensch Posted 31 Jan 2010 , 5:02pm
post #10 of 14

A stovetop, for me, would be a total waste of valuable space. I invested in a good quality hotplate for those occasions when I need boiling water, cream, etc.

loriemoms Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 4:31pm
post #11 of 14

Most areas would require a hood, even for a hot plate. I dont know understand why, I guess because of venting, but hoods are OMG $$$$$$!!!

indydebi Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 7:06pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Most areas would require a hood, even for a hot plate. I dont know understand why, I guess because of venting, but hoods are OMG $$$$$$!!!




Just to give an idea, my hood system was $1000 per linear foot and I needed 8 feet of it. That did not include installation.

CakeForte Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 7:47pm
post #13 of 14

I'm adding an electric range just because I want to also rent my space to another food service person for some additional income.

surgery2 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 10:04pm
post #14 of 14

my commercial hood in my home was $1200, and is only 46in long. what a rip off.

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