Fbct Or Rit??? I Need Help Finding Instructions...

Decorating By BakeLoveMom Updated 21 Feb 2009 , 8:09am by xstitcher

BakeLoveMom Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 3:31pm
post #1 of 8

I searched for info on how to do a FBCT and an article popped up but when I click on it it takes me to a cake recipe that has no connection to FBCT. Those of you with experience, my friend requested a last minute pan size cookie with Thumper on it. She wanted to help me make if for her hubby's b-day, mind you she can't cook or bake anything. I thought this might be an easier way for her to do this. Can anyone give me some instructions on either of these? I have never done either one. Thanks so much.


Sarah

7 replies
BakeLoveMom Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 5:53pm
post #2 of 8

BUMP
Please help, I need the info today...I know someone out there knows something...thanks guys.

Sarah

BJ Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:00pm
post #3 of 8

Here's a link to Wiltons website that tells you how to use color flow. This same technique can be used using royal icing. THere are 2 consistencies - the one used for the outline and the one used for filling in what you outlined. The one for the outline is usually a medium consistency (same as medium to thin buttercream - it will hold it's shape when piped. The filler consistency is liquidy - all you have to do is add more water (very little at a time) to the thin RI and use a parchment pastry bag with either a tip 2 or 3 to fill in the outline. I hope this article will help you. Crunch time stinks - I've been there before and it's no fun.

BJ Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:02pm
post #4 of 8

If you'd like to see examples - I have 2 cakes in my photo's that have them. One is the barney cake and the other is the Chinese New Year cake (I did the rooster on the top of the cake). thumbs_up.gif

tracey1970 Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 2:41am
post #6 of 8

Here's how I do a fbct:

I do all my fbcts on a piece of plexiglass and using a piece of acetate paper (i.e. overhead projector paper). That way, I can see right through the plexiglass. That helps me smooth the fbct on both sides. In other words, you can periodically lift up the plexiglass and look under it to see how the "right" side of the fbct will look on the cake before you have to put it on there.

So I tape my picture right to my countertop. I tape a piece of overhead film (although I have used waxed paper before with success) to plexiglass. I lay the plexiglass over the picture and start "drawing" on the overhead film. I do the outline first. From time to time, I will pop it into the freezer and then take it out and keep going. Then, I start colouring. Whenever I do a new section of colour, I lift the plexiglass and peek underneath it to see how it's going. If there are any gaps between the colouring and the outline or any squiggly lines, I take a paint brush (for cakes only) and push around the icing from the "back" side (the side that's facing up at you as you are doing the fbct) to smooth it out on the "right" side. Keep checking until it's smooth on the side that will face up on the cake. Be sure to lay the plexiglass back onto the picture carefully to keep everything lined up. Freeze the finished product.

I get my acetate film at office supply places, and any hardware store (Lowes, etc.) will sell various sizes/thickenesses of plexiglass or you can have it cut to the size you want.

Although the directions on here do so, I prefer not to put a smooth layer across the back of the fbct. I try to make sure that the fbct is an even thickness and just freeze it. I also only draw the actual picture while some people do the picture and some icing around it that will match the colour of the top of the cake. But I find that then you have to do some kind of border around the fbct which I do not always want to do. The Coke cake in my pics is done with just doing the bottle and the words - no icing around it all. Then, I just laid that on the cake and didn't have to put any border around it at all. It had a 3D look to it, and I much preferred doing it that way. I did the Little Mermaid the same way. The "jungle" fbct, I did a white area around the picture and then did that leaf border to hide where the picture met the cake.

I have also done many color flow pieces - the "Glasgow Rangers" cake in my photos is a color flow piece. I find I can get a little bit sharper detail in a color flow piece, but they are MUCH more fragile than a fbct. I usually make at least two color flow pieces, even if I only need one, to account for breakage.

I hope that makes sense! Good luck!!

BakeLoveMom Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 2:55am
post #7 of 8

Thanks so much everyone, I am very excited to try it.

Sarah

xstitcher Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 8:09am
post #8 of 8

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