Right Gumpaste For Realistic Flowers

Decorating By Rylan Updated 22 Feb 2009 , 5:39pm by tonedna

Rylan Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 9:55am
post #1 of 22

Other than the Nicholas Lodge recipe, which is the best gumpaste or gumpaste mixture I can use to make realistic looking flowers? I was hoping to roll it really thin, but won't crack. Can anyone please help me before I order my gumpaste. THANKS A LOT. Have a nice day everyone =]

21 replies
terrig007 Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 11:22am
post #2 of 22

good question. I would like to know too.

ibmoser Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 12:54pm
post #3 of 22

I prefer Nicholas Lodge's formula for flowers - it has a good "stretch" so that you can roll thin and still get additional thinning and/or ruffling around the edges. I have used Satin Ice and Wilton ready-to-use successfully, too (not the Wilton dry mix). The Satin Ice is a nice white-white. Do not use Bakels if you want it to dry firm! Those are the only ones I have used that I knew what brand it was - sometimes we use "mystery paste" in classes icon_lol.gif

Lee15 Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 1:09pm
post #4 of 22

I have used Satin Ice and I like it. You can roll it very thin. I use to make my own (I used Scott Clark Woolley's recipe which is posted on his website) until I discovered Satin Ice. So if you wish to go that route, then try it.

Rylan Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 3:41am
post #5 of 22

Thanks to everyone who helped. I gladly appreciate it. =]

didi5 Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 4:08am
post #6 of 22

I like this recipe from Scott Clark Woolley. I also find that there are different qualities of gum trag. I'm not too crazy with Wilton's gum tex.

Here's the gum paste recipe from Scott Clark Woolley:

INGREDIENTS

6 cups + 1 1/3 cups confectioner's sugar
2 tbsp. plus 2 tsp. Gum Tragacanth
6 tbsp. water
4 tsp. unflavored powdered gelatin
1 heaping tbsp. shortening
2 extra large eggs or 30 gms pasteurized egg whites

METHOD

Place 6 cups of confectioner's sugar and gum tragacanth in metal bowl over simmering water for about 5 minutes. Stir it once and remove from heat.

In a small bowl, sprinkle the gelatin on the water and leave for a few minutes until it 'blooms'. Place over simmering water or place in microwave, for about 30 seconds, until gelatin dissolves. Add in shortening to melt.

Add in this mixture, along with the egg whites, into the sugar. If using a mixer, start it at slow then when it starts to mix up, increase the speed to medium and beat for about a minute.

Make a well with the 1 1/3 cups confectioner's sugar. Scrape the gelatin/sugar mixture into the well. Work in he sugar into the mixture. It will be very loose at this moment. Grease hands and knead the paste. Cover with plastic wrap. Let it rest overnight. If in a rush, place in the refrigerator for about an hour until firm.

To use the gum paste, take a piece out and work it by stretching and pulling until it is pliable. Place unused piece in plastic wrap or plastic zipper bag. This will prevent the gum paste from drying out.

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 4:22am
post #7 of 22

If your gumpaste is cracking, try kneading a bit of shortening into it.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 4:37am
post #8 of 22

If I may offer an opinion -

When you say "the right gumpaste", I am assuming that you mean the paste which will give you the thin, delicate texture that flower petals should have.

My concern is more with where you live, as that usually dictates more which recipe to use.

You live in Vegas. I've never been there, so enlighten me - is it a dry climate? I mean, I know it's the desert, but does it get cold and damp there during this time of year?

I don't know your skill level, but if you're a newbie to gumpaste, then you need something which dries slower, so you have more time to work with it. Otherwise, in a dry climate, you will be snapping your petals apart as you try to attach them.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 5:13am
post #9 of 22

sorry to jump in but what's the diff between gum tex and gum trag?

Rylan Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 10:55am
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

If I may offer an opinion -

When you say "the right gumpaste", I am assuming that you mean the paste which will give you the thin, delicate texture that flower petals should have.

My concern is more with where you live, as that usually dictates more which recipe to use.

You live in Vegas. I've never been there, so enlighten me - is it a dry climate? I mean, I know it's the desert, but does it get cold and damp there during this time of year?

I don't know your skill level, but if you're a newbie to gumpaste, then you need something which dries slower, so you have more time to work with it. Otherwise, in a dry climate, you will be snapping your petals apart as you try to attach them.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Thanks for the reply Theresa. I saw your pictures and the cakes are AMAZING.

Las Vegas is really really dry. At this time of the year it gets really cold. Although its starting to get warm, I'm also curious what type of gumpaste to use. What I mean is that, what specific brand would you recommend? I think recipes are great but I prefer something without the use of egg whites. So I guess I would stick to a store bought gumpaste or fondant mixed with tylose.

I've used gumpaste before (I made it using glucose, gumtex and powdered sugar) before to make details on my gingerbread houses and it wasn't the best thing.

Right now I wanted I'm trying to learn how to make realistic flowers. I'm still a newbie in cake decorating with fondant. But I'm pretty sure I can learn quite fast when it comes to flowermaking. What would you recommend Theresa? =]

Rylan Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 10:57am
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by didi5

I like this recipe from Scott Clark Woolley. I also find that there are different qualities of gum trag. I'm not too crazy with Wilton's gum tex.

Here's the gum paste recipe from Scott Clark Woolley:

INGREDIENTS

6 cups + 1 1/3 cups confectioner's sugar
2 tbsp. plus 2 tsp. Gum Tragacanth
6 tbsp. water
4 tsp. unflavored powdered gelatin
1 heaping tbsp. shortening
2 extra large eggs or 30 gms pasteurized egg whites

METHOD

Place 6 cups of confectioner's sugar and gum tragacanth in metal bowl over simmering water for about 5 minutes. Stir it once and remove from heat.

In a small bowl, sprinkle the gelatin on the water and leave for a few minutes until it 'blooms'. Place over simmering water or place in microwave, for about 30 seconds, until gelatin dissolves. Add in shortening to melt.

Add in this mixture, along with the egg whites, into the sugar. If using a mixer, start it at slow then when it starts to mix up, increase the speed to medium and beat for about a minute.

Make a well with the 1 1/3 cups confectioner's sugar. Scrape the gelatin/sugar mixture into the well. Work in he sugar into the mixture. It will be very loose at this moment. Grease hands and knead the paste. Cover with plastic wrap. Let it rest overnight. If in a rush, place in the refrigerator for about an hour until firm.

To use the gum paste, take a piece out and work it by stretching and pulling until it is pliable. Place unused piece in plastic wrap or plastic zipper bag. This will prevent the gum paste from drying out.




Thanks did for the recipe. It seems like something good but I was looking for something without egg whites. I appreciate the help by the way. =]

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 1:55pm
post #12 of 22

Thanks for the praise on my pics. It's always appreciated. Go back in a few minutes, and take a look at what I did in school a few weeks ago.

Well, I'm on the East Coast, in a valley, so here, we need gumpaste which will dry quickly, due to the humidity factor. Since that is not going to be a problem for you, you could actually start out with store-bought paste.

Store-bought pastes have ingredients in them which will prevent them from drying out in the package (remember, there's no such thing as a perfect vacuum, even in outer space). It's those same ingredients which prevent some pre-made pastes from drying when used. They're definitely a no-no where I live, but they might work for you.

Is there a reason why you're reluctant to try an egg-white based recipe? I have heard and read nothing but good things about both Nick Lodge's and Scott Woolley's recipes.

You mentioned fondant mixed with Tylose. I have used this often, with great results. If it starts to dry out on you, add a bit of shortening to the paste, and you should be fine.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 21 Feb 2009 , 3:50pm
post #13 of 22

...........what's the diff between gum tex and gum trag?..........

GumTex is a product of Wilton. It is suppose to be similar to gum trag but isn't icon_smile.gif
Gum trag is a gum additive used in making gum paste. CMC is similar also, as is Tylose.

Rylan Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 12:09am
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Thanks for the praise on my pics. It's always appreciated. Go back in a few minutes, and take a look at what I did in school a few weeks ago.

Well, I'm on the East Coast, in a valley, so here, we need gumpaste which will dry quickly, due to the humidity factor. Since that is not going to be a problem for you, you could actually start out with store-bought paste.

Store-bought pastes have ingredients in them which will prevent them from drying out in the package (remember, there's no such thing as a perfect vacuum, even in outer space). It's those same ingredients which prevent some pre-made pastes from drying when used. They're definitely a no-no where I live, but they might work for you.

Is there a reason why you're reluctant to try an egg-white based recipe? I have heard and read nothing but good things about both Nick Lodge's and Scott Woolley's recipes.

You mentioned fondant mixed with Tylose. I have used this often, with great results. If it starts to dry out on you, add a bit of shortening to the paste, and you should be fine.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




I was a bit discouraged to use anything that is NOT egg-white based recipe but you made me feel so much better now. Oh yes I've heard it so many times that Nick Lodge's recipe is fabulous but I didn't want to use it since I am a paranoid baker who has a phobia on salmonella. Yes I can use pasturized eggs but I just prefer to avoid eggs.

Theresa thanks for all the information. I'm so glad you are here to help. Is there any specific brand of fondant that I can mix in with tylose that you would recommend?

tonedna Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 12:20am
post #15 of 22

I love Nicholas Lodge. Wilton premade one is good as Satin Ice is, but if they are too hard I will add some fondant. If the Nicolas Lodge turn too soft I will add either Wilton or Satin Ice to harden it.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

icer101 Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 12:27am
post #16 of 22

i love nicholas lodge also... scott wooley... wilton premade.. maybe i used satin ice wrong time of year... it was too soft... i,ll try it again. i mix tylose with pettinice... when i watch and make nicks flowers.. i use nicks gumpaste... when i watch scott and make his flowers .. i make his gumpaste.... etc.. that is when i watch their dvd's or videos...

tonedna Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 12:30am
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

i love nicholas lodge also... scott wooley... wilton premade.. maybe i used wrong time of year... it was too soft... i,ll try it again. i mix tylose with pettinice... when i watch and make nicks flowers.. i use nicks gumpaste... when i watch scott and make his flowers .. i make his gumpaste.... etc.. that is when i watch their dvd's or videos...




I am not sure if they changed the recipe. It use to be too soft, then I got one that was extra hard, and is been a constant now. I just mix it with fondant to soften it..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Rylan Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 10:05am
post #18 of 22

Thanks icer101 for the reply. And Edna, Thanks for the top mixing gumpaste with fondant to soften it. Sometimes Ive seen hard gumpaste wilton and They feel rock solid. I guess fondant is the key to make it softer.

playingwithsugar Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 11:07am
post #19 of 22

At school, we use FondX or Pettinice. I have made both into gumpaste. My honest opinion -

FondX works better, because it takes the normal recipe to make it into gumpaste, and it can be used right away. I had some leftover Pettinice fondant from the carved cake project we did at school last week, which I brought home and made into gumpaste. It not only took more Tylose to make it the right consistency, but I had to let it sit for 36 hours before I could get any stretch out of it.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 3:31pm
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

At school, we use FondX or Pettinice. I have made both into gumpaste. My honest opinion -

FondX works better, because it takes the normal recipe to make it into gumpaste, and it can be used right away. I had some leftover Pettinice fondant from the carved cake project we did at school last week, which I brought home and made into gumpaste. It not only took more Tylose to make it the right consistency, but I had to let it sit for 36 hours before I could get any stretch out of it.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Fondx is supposedly better than Satin Ice. Is just not as easily available as Satin Ice. In my case I would have to buy it through the internet.
Edna

playingwithsugar Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 4:32pm
post #21 of 22

Edna -

I do not agree that FondX is better. To me, the fondant, by itself, feels like plastic, and has the smell of artificial clear vanilla to it. I do not have that experience with Satin Ice. But we all have our own opinions, right?

On the other hand, to make FondX into gumpaste, well, that's a different story. I am very pleased with how well it turns out, and that it is useable immediately.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 22 Feb 2009 , 5:39pm
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Edna -

I do not agree that FondX is better. To me, the fondant, by itself, feels like plastic, and has the smell of artificial clear vanilla to it. I do not have that experience with . But we all have our own opinions, right?

On the other hand, to make FondX into gumpaste, well, that's a different story. I am very pleased with how well it turns out, and that it is useable immediately.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




I dont like fondant taste.So I do agree with you!..lol..
The majority of the cakes I make are buttercream cause of this reason and the fact that people dont really like the chewy texture of fondant. But the fact that satin ice tends to crack more is an issue that fondx dont have as much. I guess is a give and take situation.
I do play with all mediums available and when one doesnt work for something I know It will work for something else..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%