Any Tips On Making A Tapered Cake?

Decorating By -Tubbs Updated 20 Feb 2009 , 6:30am by xstitcher

-Tubbs Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 11:45pm
post #1 of 10

I'm making a 40th birthday cake for a friend (my gift, therefore my design). I want to do a cake with tapered tiers, i.e each tier wider at the top than at the bottom. Are there any issues with covering with fondant with this kind of cake? I'm thinking about the fact that there is lots of fondant to reduce to a smaller diameter... Are there any guidelines for what proportions look best (4" tiers?), etc
Thanks for any tips...

9 replies
Chippi Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 12:08am
post #2 of 10

Here are some links that may help you icon_smile.gif

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-614458.html

http://www.cakecentral.com/article1-Instructions-For-Building-A-Whimsical-Tilted-Cake.htmls

Below is a short youtube.com video that has a series of 17 they are very short and not in a language that I understand but if you are an eyes on person it may help. She does a topsy turvy cake from start to finish. HTH

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39A_NHNvcio&feature=related

Lots of reading included. Good luck on your cake!
Chippi

-Tubbs Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 2:23pm
post #3 of 10

Thanks for the links Chippi! I don't actually want to do a topsy turvy cake, just one with tapered sides, but many of the points will be the same, I'm sure. I didn't think about using different sized pans for each tier... interesting.

Anyone else with tips for covering this kind of cake? Doesn't it get all baggy round the bottom?

tx_cupcake Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 2:31pm
post #4 of 10

I've never done this type of cake before, however, I also have a birthday cake coming up where I need to have tapered tiers (not topsy).

I am guessing that covering a tapered tier isn't all that different from covering a regular one. Either way, I am very interested in hearing what everyone else has to say.

DianeLM Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 3:54pm
post #5 of 10

I've done quite a few tapered tiers. For 2 layer tiers, I prefer to bake the layers the same size.

Start with a two layer cake, say, 10-inch round.

Place a 10-inch round cake circle on one end, and an 8-inch circle on the other end.

Working inside a large pan or baking sheet to confine the mess, elevate the cake a few inches on something narrower than the cake, like a 6 or 7 inch cake pan.

The 8-inch board side should be up. Put non-skid mat between the cake and it's elevator so it doesn't slip off.

Now, take a long, serrated knife and, using the cake boards as guides, carve away the sides of the cake. Flip the cake over, place on it's permanent board and away you go!

If you plan to fill the layers with something other than buttercream, place a couple of small cardboard cake circles between your layers before carving.

After carving, take the two layers apart, remove the cake circles, pipe your dam, add filling and replace the layers. Trim, if necessary.

When covering with fondant, just be sure to lift the fondant away from the sides of the cake periodically to prevent pleating.

I prefer to cover a partially chilled cake, crumb-coated with cake spackle (crumbs mixed w/icing). The surface of the spackle stays dry long enough to manipulate the fondant. Then, condensation forms causing the fondant to finally adhere to the cake.

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1216111

tx_cupcake Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 4:39pm
post #6 of 10

Diane, please come to my house!!! icon_biggrin.gif Seriously, your work is amazing! Thank you so much for the instructions. thumbs_up.gif

-Tubbs Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 5:54pm
post #7 of 10

Perfect - thanks Diane! I now have a great visual of what's needed. Can't wait to start...

jlynnw Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 6:25pm
post #8 of 10

I did mine upside down so it flared out and then turned it over and put a different color top on it, decorated the seam and called it good! I will have to try this again!

DianeLM Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 7:45pm
post #9 of 10

Oh goody! I'm glad you all were able to understand my directions.

BTW, on my Copper Beer Tub cake, I used 3 layers of cake (actually 6 layers after torting). I covered the cake with fondant while it was still upside down, then flipped it over, so there was fondant underneath the cake.

Gotta be very careful not to roll your fondant too thick if you try this technique, otherwise, it may fall off the cake.

xstitcher Posted 20 Feb 2009 , 6:30am
post #10 of 10

What a fabulous cake Diane! Thanks for the instructions! thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

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