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Decorating By newathis Updated 16 Feb 2009 , 9:18pm by tiggy2

newathis Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 9:55pm
post #1 of 11

Hi, i am making a cake friday and was writing out my list of things to buy, when i started thinking about the stacking, and i don't know if i am missing a step or overanalyzing, but if you are stacking a cake iced all in buttercream, when you take it apart to cut it or when you cut it up, doesn't the buttercream come off the top of the layer on the bottom of the cake you just took off or cut up??? Does everyone use a plate and cardboard circle between stacked layers, or just cardboard???? AM i just missing a step?? thanks for replying icon_redface.gif

10 replies
kakeladi Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 12:48am
post #2 of 11

You sprinkle some powder sugar; coconut; finely chopped nuts; very fine crumbs or other type of barrier. Some people use parchment paper but I think that is looking for trouble.
And there are some who cut their support (straws, dowels etc) 1/4" longer than the icing. This again in my opinion is looking for trouble when transporting.

redpanda Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 1:26am
post #3 of 11

I let the icing on the bottom cake crust and then put powdered sugar on the surface, followed by a parchment piece that fits within the area within the dowels (in other words smaller than the size of the cake above). I don't know why that is looking for trouble. To me, it seems to keep the top of the icing neater than if the parchment isn't used. I've tried both ways, and I just like the way it looks better.

I've transported stacked (with center dowel) cakes on the steep, windy roads out of my neighborhood, and have never had any kind of a problem from the parchment.

Deb_ Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 2:09am
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

You sprinkle some powder sugar; coconut; finely chopped nuts; very fine crumbs or other type of barrier. Some people use parchment paper but I think that is looking for trouble.
And there are some who cut their support (straws, dowels etc) 1/4" longer than the icing. This again in my opinion is looking for trouble when transporting.




I guess I've been asking for trouble for over 25 yrs because I'm one of those that does cut my pillars slightly higher than the icing so that the plate above doesn't touch the icing. Not 1/4 inch longer but maybe 1/8 inch. Not sure why someone would consider this "asking for trouble", the pillars lock into the above plates and there is a center support also.

What about the cakes that have tiers 6 or 12 inches above the tier below, I guess that's playing with fire! icon_razz.gif That logic just doesn't make any sense to me, sorry but maybe you didn't think before you typed it?

To me sprinkling a foreign matter like chopped nuts when there could be allergies in question is "asking for trouble".

To the OP, if you don't want to cut your pillars/supports SLIGHTLY longer than needed than use the PS/parchment method, that way you're not introducing a new ingredient like nuts or coconut to your client's cake. A lot of people, including me, hate both of those things and I'd be pretty unhappy to bite into it if I didn't order it. The PS will dry out your icing enough to keep the plate above from pulling the icing off of the cake.

dl5crew Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 2:19am
post #5 of 11

I also use powdered sugar. I haven't tried the parchment paper yet. Maybe one day I'll venture out of my box and try it. icon_wink.gif

stephaniescakenj Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 2:21am
post #6 of 11

I am one that has trouble with cutting my dowels higher than my icing even just a little higher. I find it leaves too large a gap and then I have to make a larger border to cover it up when I prefer the smaller bead type border. Plus it always feel wobblier even though its probably all in my head. I also use a non crusting icing. I cut a piece of wax paper and lay that down first then put my tier on top. You can run into trouble with this method too because sometimes the icing sticks and sometimes it doesn't. I find it easier to pull the top tier off and then slowly remove the wax paper. It takes off less icing that way.

Anyway, I'm pretty sure that's what kakeladi was referring to when she mentioned "trouble"

Deb_ Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 2:52am
post #7 of 11

stephaniescakesnj........I'm talking 1/8 inch longer, that's VERY slight and really unnoticeable. When I set my plate onto the supports you can't see any space between the 2 tiers at all. Now if someone were to cut it 1/4 inch longer than you may see a separation and need a larger border. 1/8" is very little, the pillars barely stick up above the icing.

Don't forget that it's the pillars or dowels that support the tiers, not the actual cake. If you're using a sturdy support system than that's what really matters.

kakeladi Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 5:55pm
post #8 of 11

........cakes that have tiers 6 or 12 inches above the tier below, I guess that's playing with fire! Razz That logic just doesn't make any sense to me, sorry but maybe you didn't think before you typed it? .......

No, I DID think long and hard.....well didn't have to think long ....because when I use parchment *once* the tiers slipped apart in transport.
Cakes that are 6 to 12" are on *pillars* not dowel rods.......a totally different elephant!!

........ Not 1/4 inch longer but maybe 1/8 inch. Not sure why someone would consider this "asking for trouble", the pillars lock into the above plates and there is a center support also.........

See, you are not talking about *dowels* you are talking pillars and plate. Not at all the same thing.

........I am one that has trouble with cutting my dowels higher than my icing even just a little higher. I find it leaves too large a gap and then I have to make a larger border to cover it up when I prefer the smaller bead type border. Plus it always feel wobblier even though its probably all in my head.........
Well if it's 'all in your head' it is in mine too icon_smile.gif

Break out the crumbs! icon_smile.gif

LittleLinda Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 6:07pm
post #9 of 11

I always have each tier on cardboard covered in white contace paper.

newathis Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 8:00pm
post #10 of 11

thanks for all the suggestions....i thought there was only one good way to do it, guess not....i am begining to realize with cake decorating there isn't one good way to do anything icon_smile.gif

tiggy2 Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 9:18pm
post #11 of 11

Using dowels are asking for trouble, no matter what length you cut them. I've had them shift and it's like they aren't even there. I'll never use them again!

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