How Do I Stop My Cake From Rising Too Much?

Decorating By babyoven Updated 16 Feb 2009 , 2:13am by classiccake

babyoven Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 7:06am
post #1 of 9

Hi Whenever I bake a cake it always rises up massively to a point. I always dig a hole in the mixture before I put it in the oven but it still does this HELP! icon_sad.gif

8 replies
HoldensNanny Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 7:17am
post #2 of 9

Use the bake even strips from Wiltons They make a hec of a difference -you attach them around the outside of the pan- thumbs_up.gif

JanH Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 7:28am
post #3 of 9

Hi and Welcome to CC, babyoven. icon_smile.gif

Decoding CC acronyms:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Everything you ever wanted to know to bake, assemble and decorate your first tiered/stacked/layer cake:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

The above contains links to Wilton's cake baking & making help, such as cake preparation charts which give batter requirements by pan size (as well as recommended baking times and temps.). And so much more.

It's possible that you're adding too much batter to your pans. (Info is also provided on bake-even strips and inverted flower nails as heating cores.)

HTH

JanH Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 7:29am
post #4 of 9

Hi and Welcome to CC, babyoven. icon_smile.gif

Decoding CC acronyms:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Everything you ever wanted to know to bake, assemble and decorate your first tiered/stacked/layer cake:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

The above contains links to Wilton's cake baking & making help, such as cake preparation charts which give batter requirements by pan size (as well as recommended baking times and temps.). And so much more.

It's possible that you're adding too much batter to your pans. (Info is also provided on bake-even strips and inverted flower nails as heating cores.)

HTH

JanH Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 7:32am
post #5 of 9

Hi and Welcome to CC, babyoven. icon_smile.gif

Decoding CC acronyms:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Everything you ever wanted to know to bake, assemble and decorate your first tiered/stacked/layer cake:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

The above contains links to Wilton's cake baking & making help, such as cake preparation charts which give batter requirements by pan size (as well as recommended baking times and temps.). And so much more.

It's possible that you're adding too much batter to your pans. (Info is also provided on bake-even strips and inverted flower nails as heating cores.)

HTH

2txmedics Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 2:07pm
post #6 of 9

I use them, sometimes they work...other times I still get a slight mound on top...question...maybe Im putting them on wrong...do you put the strips under the edge of the cake pan...around the base, or do you put it to the very edge of the top of the cake pan?

How does putting a rose nail in upside down work as a heating core if its so thin? does it work on larger cakes? good idea though

indydebi Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 3:35pm
post #7 of 9

http://forum.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=3467363#3467363
Here a link to a thread that explains the science of how and why baking strips work. They do not guarantee a perfectly flat cake ... but they greatly restrict the doming effect.

kakeladi Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 2:00am
post #8 of 9

Turn your oven temp downicon_smile.gif Baking at 350 will always make it rise in the middle.
Using the wet strips help some.....but if you bake at 300 or 325 it probably isn't even necessary to use them.

classiccake Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 2:13am
post #9 of 9

Three things will help your cakes bake more evenly:

1. Don't overfill the pans.

2. Don't bake too fast (hot).

3. Don't overbeat the batter.

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