Cracked Ganache?

Decorating By Kitagrl Updated 17 Feb 2009 , 3:34pm by rockysmommy

Kitagrl Posted 14 Feb 2009 , 7:40pm
post #1 of 8

I made two large 11x15 sheets for a church banquet last night. Each one was four thin layers with chocolate mousse between. Then Iced and ganached. We used one sheet but had one totally leftover, that I never even took out of the fridge.

This morning I went to wrap it, figured I'd freeze it and use it for another church function coming up...and the entire surface of the ganache was full of cracks, like ice breaking up in spring or something. I have done ganache cakes before, so I have no clue what happened...but I don't want it happening again, especially not for a wedding!!!! I did a ganache wedding cake a few mos ago and the ganache did not crack.

Any clues? It seems to have cracked overnight, as the one I served last night was smooth and fine.

7 replies
costumeczar Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 2:14pm
post #2 of 8

That's weird, but maybe the icing got hard, then the board moved when the cake was moved around, and the ganache cracked because the icing under it cracked. Sometimes I get cracks on the surface of sheet cakes when I move them and the board flexes, so that might be what happened. I'd use a thicker board that wouldn't flex the next time and see if that helps. (this is assuming that you used a regular 1/8" sheet board.)

Kitagrl Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 2:17pm
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

That's weird, but maybe the icing got hard, then the board moved when the cake was moved around, and the ganache cracked because the icing under it cracked. Sometimes I get cracks on the surface of sheet cakes when I move them and the board flexes, so that might be what happened. I'd use a thicker board that wouldn't flex the next time and see if that helps. (this is assuming that you used a regular 1/8" sheet board.)




Well, see that's the thing...I didn't move this particular cake once I poured the ganache. Except I did move it from the rack to an actual aluminum pan, since I meant to just serve it rather than display it.

So if it was going to crack, it would have had to crack when I moved it...but the other one got moved too and it did not crack....but once it was on the aluminum pan, it couldn't possibly flex.

Weird.

costumeczar Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 2:24pm
post #4 of 8

Here's another idea...Did you use the new trans-fat free crisco int he icing? I did a cake once with that and it was sitting out at room temperature in a box. When I went to get it later it had developed little hairline crack-looking marks all over it. It hadn't been moved at all, it just did that on its own. I switched to a store-brand shortening and that solved that, but it was weird how it did that without being moved at all.

It's just strange that the one cake did that and your other one didn't.

Kitagrl Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 2:29pm
post #5 of 8

Nope I use generic shortening without TF....

I didn't know if maybe sitting in the bottom of my fridge (its one of my two dedicated cake-only fridges) that it somehow got too cold and cracked? Because I didn't notice the cracks until later that night when I was wrapping it to freeze for later.

costumeczar Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 2:57pm
post #6 of 8

That was my next thought, too. Maybe part of the fridge is colder and that affected it differently. Maybe you'll just have to chalk this one up to the cake gremlins. I have a couple of things that happened to me over the years that defy explanation, too. It just falls under the category of "general weirdness."

Kitagrl Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 3:23pm
post #7 of 8

I guess. I'm just glad it wasn't for display or even for a customer or wedding! I have NEVER seen that happen before.

rockysmommy Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 3:34pm
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I guess. I'm just glad it wasn't for display or even for a customer or wedding! I have NEVER seen that happen before.


Me either...

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