Scrambled Eggs In Cake? Yuk!!!!

Decorating By Marina Updated 17 Feb 2009 , 6:49pm by Deb_

Marina Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 10:51pm
post #1 of 10

I baked a cake last night. Looks good, but have to trim a little on the side. Cut into it and "what the heck is this???" icon_eek.gif ...a very thin layer of scambled eggs!!!! icon_cry.gif Apparently, It didn't mix all the way. This has never happened before (that I know of, anyways). I normally put the eggs in the mixing bowl first just in case a piece of shell decides to jump in (and must be retrieved) and then add the rest of the ingredients. I didn't see anything out f the ordinary when I was pouring it in the pan. Needless to say I made another one....and made sure the eggs were beaten and totally mixed in!!! Has this ever happened to anyone before?

9 replies
leah_s Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 11:02pm
post #2 of 10

nope.

jammjenks Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 11:04pm
post #3 of 10

Me either. It sure was a good thing you had to trim it.

Deb_ Posted 14 Feb 2009 , 8:26pm
post #4 of 10

Beat your eggs til fluffy first..........your cakes will be a lot lighter and higher too.

sugarshack Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 4:47am
post #5 of 10

yep. it has. and its gross. lol

lchristi27 Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 5:08am
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Beat your eggs til fluffy first..........your cakes will be a lot lighter and higher too.




Really? I never thought of that, before adding them to the cake mix? Great idea..

indydebi Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 5:17am
post #7 of 10

I find the eggs are more likely to be beaten into the batter if I add them on top of the dry ingredients ... if the eggs are in the bottom of the bowl, they can get missed and not mixed as well. when they are on top of the dry ingredients, the paddle definitely grabs onto them and pulls them into the mixture.

I've only noticed this happening since I switched to a 20-qt, though. Results may differ with a smaller mixer or a KA.

Deb_ Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 3:45pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by lchristi27

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Beat your eggs til fluffy first..........your cakes will be a lot lighter and higher too.



Really? I never thought of that, before adding them to the cake mix? Great idea..




I bake from scratch so the techniques are different. First, I'm creaming my butter/sugar extracts, then I add my beaten eggs to that, the dry ingredients are mixed separately and added to the butter mixture alternately with the liquid used in the recipe. So I'm not just pouring the eggs onto the dry or vice versa.

I suppose with a mix, you could beat your eggs separately first, and after sifting your mix (if you do) add the wet ingredients to it, I can't see why it wouldn't work for you. My thinking is the more air you can incorporate into your eggs, the lighter/higher your cakes will be.

bethola Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 4:14pm
post #9 of 10

Okay, I just found a cookbook (circa 1934) that I obtained from my step MIL. Title "How to Make a Good Cake" I kid you not! LOL It is the "funnest" thing EVER to read. But, straight to the point. I noticed yesterday that literally every recipe said to beat the eggs (by hand of course, LOL) until light and airy and then fold the dry ingredients into the eggs. I THINK the very small amount of liquid used was alternated with the dry ingredients. Anyway it promised a light and fluffy cake every time! I'm going to try it this weekend!

Beth in KY

PS SOMETIMES it said you could use a rotary egg beater! My mother used one of those!

Deb_ Posted 17 Feb 2009 , 6:49pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethola

Okay, I just found a cookbook (circa 1934) that I obtained from my step MIL. Title "How to Make a Good Cake" I kid you not! LOL It is the "funnest" thing EVER to read. But, straight to the point. I noticed yesterday that literally every recipe said to beat the eggs (by hand of course, LOL) until light and airy and then fold the dry ingredients into the eggs. I THINK the very small amount of liquid used was alternated with the dry ingredients. Anyway it promised a light and fluffy cake every time! I'm going to try it this weekend!

Beth in KY

PS SOMETIMES it said you could use a rotary egg beater! My mother used one of those!




Well, I can assure you I wasn't around in 1934, although sometimes after a long week on my feet I feel like I was born back then icon_rolleyes.gif !
What that book says is exactly how I do it.

I forgot to add that sometimes if I notice a lot of large pieces of albumin in the eggs after I beat them, I'll strain them through a sieve and discard those slimy buggers so they don't cook up in the cake and turn into hard globs. Don't you just love my technical terms? "buggers" and "globs"! icon_wink.gif

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