Is It Possible To Fix Icing That Is Bitter From Color????

Decorating By Angfastic Updated 16 Feb 2009 , 7:16pm by FlourPots

Angfastic Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 5:13am
post #1 of 15

I added wilton rose to some buttercream and now it has an awful bitter taste. Is there any way to fix or do I just dump it out?

Thanks.

14 replies
Ballymena Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 5:38am
post #2 of 15

I don't think so. Buy the color that has 'no taste' on the label.

kaat Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 1:35pm
post #3 of 15

I haven't tried this with BC but when I made black RI for christmas cookies I noticed it was pretty bitter. I added a few drops of artificial almond extract and it was way better!

kakeladi Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 3:34pm
post #4 of 15

Yes add any flavoring that will go w/the color &/or cake it's being used on.
For red you can add a bit of KoolAid, cinnamon, cherry juice, or extract.

rockysmommy Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 3:39pm
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Yes add any flavoring that will go w/the color &/or cake it's being used on.
For red you can add a bit of KoolAid, cinnamon, cherry juice, or extract.




This good to know...I dumped some red butter cream because of the bitter taste...Thanks!

lchristi27 Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 3:41pm
post #6 of 15

Or use Americolor, they arent as harsh as the Wilton Stuff.

rockysmommy Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 3:45pm
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by lchristi27

Or use Americolor, they arent as harsh as the Wilton Stuff.




Some of the Americolor came with my airbrush...do they have gel colors too?

tiggy2 Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 3:58pm
post #8 of 15

If yu use chefmaster liqua gel colors it takes very little to get vibrant colors so no bitter taste. The colors are concentrated so it only takes a small amount to achiever red, black, etc. and it is instant, no waiting for the color to intensify.

rockysmommy Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 4:03pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

If yu use chefmaster liqua gel colors it takes very little to get vibrant colors so no bitter taste. The colors are concentrated so it only takes a small amount to achiever red, black, etc. and it is instant, no waiting for the color to intensify.




Sounds great...where do you buy the chefmaster liqua gel colors?

kakeladi Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 4:56pm
post #10 of 15

............where do you buy the chefmaster liqua gel colors?........

Country Kitchen (Ft. Wayne, IN). is one place.

rockysmommy Posted 13 Feb 2009 , 5:06pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

............where do you buy the chefmaster liqua gel colors?........

Country Kitchen (Ft. Wayne, IN). is one place.




Thanks... icon_wink.gif

Angfastic Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 5:16am
post #12 of 15

Thanks I'll try that. I ended using the leftover purple I had for the cake, but I still have the hot pink.

cakesbykitty Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 5:21pm
post #13 of 15

one of the first things i taught my students was that the wilton red is made from a very bitter bean and to use it sparingly. I now use super red by americolor...

i have used a packet of red Kool-Aid in my icing to get a brilliant red (see clown cake)... the bonus? super yummy cherry icing!

FlourPots Posted 15 Feb 2009 , 5:51pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakesbykitty


i have used a packet of red Kool-Aid in my icing to get a brilliant red (see clown cake)... the bonus? super yummy cherry icing!




Do you mean plain and tart, straight from the packet? Does it work for making fondant red?

FlourPots Posted 16 Feb 2009 , 7:16pm
post #15 of 15

Has anyone else used Kool-Aid?

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