Need Help With Wed Cake Quote, Please...

Business By kellertur Updated 12 Feb 2009 , 3:15am by cakesdivine

kellertur Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 6:12pm
post #1 of 11

I received a request for a 3 - 4 tier square wedding cake to feed 150 ppl. It's going to be buttercream (no fondant).

Seeing how I only have 2 8" square pans and I have to purchase some.
But, I have NO idea which size pans to use. The "saving the top tier" part is throwing me off a bit...

I need to quote him for saving the top tier and also a quote for not.
I explained if he's saving the top for the anniversary, it's not part of the serving count.

I would appreciate any help you can offer.
Thank you. icon_smile.gif

10 replies
shorty56 Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 6:20pm
post #2 of 11

i use a 7/10/13 when i do square tiers for 150. i always count the top tier in the servings though, as i bake a free anniversary tier at their anniversary. i would charge $412.50 for a cake that size, with a possible devliery fee depending on their venue. if you do this as a business and expect to get regular orders then you'll just have to make the investment in the pans. if this is a one time sort of thing and you'll never use the pans again, you may want add an equipment charge for it.

snarkybaker Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 6:21pm
post #3 of 11

http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

Here is a chart to use yo figure out your servings. If you don't have square pans, I would suggest adding 50 cents per serving to cover the cost. ( Being a vegan baker, you are going to be difficult to compete with on price, so charge whatever you want)

delisa01 Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 6:47pm
post #4 of 11

I have used sheet pans and cut what I needed for square cakes, including a wedding cake and a 18in square cake. I found that I use a sheet pan much more than I would lets say a 7 in square. You have some waste (that my family enjoys) but it doesn't cost as much as buying pans that you may not use again. Just a thought you might want to consider when buying your square pans.

leah_s Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 8:57pm
post #5 of 11

Also, do not use Earlene's chart unless you like providing free cake to your customers. Use the Wilton chart, which can be found in each of their wedding cake books and on their website. Every caterer in the country cuts to the Wilton chart anyway, so if you provide larger servings, you're giving it away for free.

KHalstead Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 9:07pm
post #6 of 11

I round down wilton's chart (just in case I get hired to stay and cut the cake, it gives me a little buffer when cutting to make sure I get all the servings I told them...but I've never had a problem getting all the servings) in any case...I would go by wilton's chart over Earlene's chart because I just hate giving away cake....I give away too much cake as it is! So in that case, I would suggest a 6",8",10,12" squares for a total of 150 (wilton's chart rounded down to the nearest 5 serv.)not counting the top 6" for the servings with the top tier they'd have 165 serv. either way you'd charge them for 165 serv.

Ruth0209 Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 9:17pm
post #7 of 11

After Leah's advice on another thread about serving charts, I decided I have to get serious about this pricing business once and for all, and now I'm a convert to the Wilton chart. Thanks for that encouragement Leah!

snarkybaker Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 9:45pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Also, do not use Earlene's chart unless you like providing free cake to your customers. Use the Wilton chart, which can be found in each of their wedding cake books and on their website. Every caterer in the country cuts to the Wilton chart anyway, so if you provide larger servings, you're giving it away for free.




I actually use it as an advertising point. I tell brides " our cakes are sized to be a proper piece of cake so you wont have to have another dessert or sweet table. Most bakers will quote using the Wilton chart which are about a third smaller. "

They still buy a slice of cake for everyone attending the wedding, and it suits our " everything is a little grander at Sugarland" image.

loriemoms Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 10:08pm
post #9 of 11

I am also a firm beleiver in Earlenes chart...I don't mind "giving cake away" as you put it, becuase I rather not hear stories of people running out of cake. Have you ever cut 12 pieces out of a 6 inch cake? they have to be paper thin! My cakes are good, I think a good healthy tasty piece of cake is worth it...I also dont care for thier cutting chart! You need to use a ruler! hahaha! (I love indydeb's cutting guide. I use it all the time! I wish I had a topsy turvey photo guide!)

kellertur Posted 12 Feb 2009 , 3:04am
post #10 of 11

Thanks for the responses. icon_smile.gif I do get confused when there are a few different serving charts. I think I will go by the Wilton chart (thanks for that info Leahs).

I'm not familiar with Indydebi's serving chart (as someone mentioned.)
Is it in one of the galleries? icon_confused.gif

If you were ever "stood up" for a consultation or tasting, what is the etiquette for handling this? (unless there is a family emergency, of course.) Do you let them know that your time is valuable? Or do you blow it off, realizing they aren't interested? Just wondering... this hasn't happened to me yet, but it probably will at some point in time... icon_sad.gif

Thank you. icon_smile.gif

cakesdivine Posted 12 Feb 2009 , 3:15am
post #11 of 11

I don't know, I think 8 cubic inches (which the Wilton chart uses) is a decent size of cake serving, not skimpy at all.

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