Please Help Me Understand

Decorating By BitsnBites Updated 11 Feb 2009 , 4:11am by BCJean

BitsnBites Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 9:19pm
post #1 of 18

I'm probably going to get hanged for asking, but I've never ever seen a carved, 3d, topsy turvy cake, etc. in person, and I have only seen 1 cake covered in fondant (gross).
So what I don't understand is using "edible" things, ie Rice crispy covered in fondant, spaghetti as skewers, etc. to decorate cakes. I imagine no one eats them. They just take them out of the cake before eating. Why go to all the trouble of making fondant figures? So why not use Styrofoam or clay or something food safe but not edible? Wouldn't it be easier?

That being said, I am in awe at what everyone here is able to do. You are all truly artists and I hope to be as good some day. But as I said, I am new to all these fondant, RK, buttercream (made with shortening) style of decorating.

17 replies
Deb_ Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 9:58pm
post #2 of 18

Sugarart......very simple. It keeps it all edible and it's a sugar masterpiece. Sure, it may be easier to sculpt an object out of styro-foam, but not everyone can successfully create figurines out of gumpaste or fondant. It's an art and sugar is the medium.

Spaghetti in cakes? That's one I've not heard of before. icon_confused.gif

rockysmommy Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:06pm
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Sugarart......very simple. It keeps it all edible and it's a sugar masterpiece. Sure, it may be easier to sculpt an object out of styro-foam, but not everyone can successfully create figurines out of gumpaste or fondant. It's an art and sugar is the medium.

Spaghetti in cakes? That's one I've not heard of before. icon_confused.gif




Spaghetti???? Wouldn't that go limp from the moisture of the cake if inserted? That is new to me too... icon_rolleyes.gif

tonicake Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:11pm
post #4 of 18

I get what you are saying. However, some people do eat those things and others save it in their freezers. I don't know why, but they do.

I made a grill for a wedding shower and they told me everything was eaten except for the stand it was on. I air brushed dried spaghetti for the grill and marsh mellows for the coals. I wouldn't have eaten it, but they wanted to and did (and liked it!). It was 3D and is still one of my favorite original designs.

The reason I do it is to show people I'm willing to go the extra mile for them and I know they appreciate that.

Do what works for you and gives YOU the most satisfaction. Everyone is different.

Hope this helps a little.

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:12pm
post #5 of 18

Not if it isn't put in there wayyyyy ahead of time. I have used it successfully....the thicker noodle of course, and inserted pretty much as last minute as possible. They were a bit damp when pulled out, but I'm sure they could have stayed in at least a whole day!

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:13pm
post #6 of 18

And, pasta sitting in a damp and coolish environment is not the same as pasta roiling around in boiling water....KWIM?

skeet1zp Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:14pm
post #7 of 18

I've used spaghetti before. I cover it with royal or buttercream icing and then stick flowers on it. The spaghetti stays nice and firm.

Here's a picture of a cake I used spaghetti on.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1233525.html

rockysmommy Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:15pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie85364

Not if it isn't put in there wayyyyy ahead of time. I have used it successfully....the thicker noodle of course, and inserted pretty much as last minute as possible. They were a bit damp when pulled out, but I'm sure they could have stayed in at least a whole day!




Thanks...I learned something today. icon_smile.gif

iamlis Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:19pm
post #9 of 18

Well, if you do any type of little characters mafe of fondant and gum paste that could be eaten you need to run a spaghetti (dry) stick through it to hold it upright. I see alot of people use a toothpick through their character but that could be a dangerous action if someone bit into it.

Win Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:20pm
post #10 of 18

Spaghetti in fondant/gumpaste figures in place of toothpicks for stability... just in case a little one decides to bite the head off. That's what I use spaghetti for --mostly. When I make miniature flowers, I use spaghetti as the stem (Painted green.)

Simply put, it's edible art. It's actually a challenge to see how creative one can get using edible items. As well, in competition, only the Styrofoam dummy is acceptable as "non edible." Everything else must be made of sugar. Some competition venues do not even allow wires, etc. to be poked into the cakes...

jer702 Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:26pm
post #11 of 18

I didn't know about the spaghetti either..the things that I learn on this site, I just love it. thumbs_up.gif

tonicake Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 10:26pm
post #12 of 18

I should have posted the link to the cake I mentioned. It's used differently than the flowers on the spaghetti.

Grill:

  http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1239610.html

Toni

TooMuchCake Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 12:23am
post #13 of 18

About the spaghetti... I do what I call "spaghetti sparklers" instead of making something out of wire to add height and/or drama to a cake. I melt white chocolate in a mug or something deep so that I can dip the spaghetti into it. Then, while the chocolate is still warm but not drippy, I sprinkle it with colored nonpariels (sp?) or sanding sugar. Lots of edible visual impact. I send them home with the customers with instructions to add them to the cake right before their party begins. If they have to be in the cake for a longer time, I'll first dip the to-be-inserted end of the spaghetti in white chocolate, let it set up, then dip and decorate the other end. The chocolate keeps the spaghetti from getting soft.

Deanna

poohsmomma Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 12:45am
post #14 of 18

Thanks for the idea about the spaghetti sparklers. The white chocolate on the spaghetti could come in handy in other ways, too.
And about the sugar/fondant/gumpaste characters. For me it's a challenge to try to figure out how to create something fun and creative out of edible ingredients. It's the frustrated artist in me, I guess!

Although I've been a visitor to CC for a while, and a member for a while, I'm new to the forums. I must say I enjoy the interaction...I will probably be joining the addicts before long.

jammjenks Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 3:34am
post #15 of 18

I've seen guitar cakes where the decorator used spaghetti as the strings.

tjrobin31 Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 3:43am
post #16 of 18

i've used spaghetti dyed green for the grass coming out of the mouth of a cow cake i did for my son, it just added a lil extra something, i also use it for support in figures, and such,
wow who knew spaghetti was so versatile!!!!!!and in a pinch it's always handy

Eisskween Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 3:52am
post #17 of 18

I use spaghetti as a support structure for my fondant sculptures. And a lot of people refer to fondant as playdoh for big people! LOL icon_biggrin.gif

BCJean Posted 11 Feb 2009 , 4:11am
post #18 of 18

I decorate with buttercream and use spaghetti, covered with buttercream for a lot of things. ....the guitar strings, stamens in flowers, antenna for bugs, whiskers for cats....

It is easy to coat the spaghetti with buttercream, you use a #4 or 5 tip, whatever the spaghetti will fit in, insert the spaghetti...through the tip into the bag of icing...pull it back out ..and it is coated.

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