How To Tactfully Say No?

Business By thelittlecakehouse Updated 10 Feb 2009 , 2:41am by thelittlecakehouse

thelittlecakehouse Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 1:37pm
post #1 of 10

I've been making cakes for a couple of years. They are small party size cakes. Word of mouth has brought me more business in the last couple months and I have a request to make a 2-3 tier cake to serve 200.

I dont have pans or an oven big enough to make just a 2 or 3 tier cake to feed that many. The biggest pan I can bake is a 12 in round.

How do I say no without seeming to be so incompetent??

9 replies
-K8memphis Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 1:54pm
post #2 of 10

"Sorry I'm not licensed to bake for the public."

"I'm not taking wedding cake orders at the present time."

"I only bake for fun."

"I'm allergic to weddings, I break out in panic." icon_biggrin.gif

"I'll leave that to the professionals, baking is a hobby for me."

Maybe something like that would spark an idea for you.

brincess_b Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 2:04pm
post #3 of 10

if you could, do you want to do the cake? you could say you dont have the pans for a 2-3 teir cake, but could work out a design with more tiers for them. or that youd have to increase prices to cover buying new pans!
or else the other quotes are really easy get outs!
xx

kelleym Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 3:14pm
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparklediva

I've been making cakes for a couple of years. They are small party size cakes. Word of mouth has brought me more business in the last couple months and I have a request to make a 2-3 tier cake to serve 200.

I dont have pans or an oven big enough to make just a 2 or 3 tier cake to feed that many. The biggest pan I can bake is a 12 in round.

How do I say no without seeming to be so incompetent??




I don't think it would make you seem incompetent at ALL! icon_eek.gif That's a massive amount of cake for a home oven. I don't think there's any way you could do it as a 2-tier, period, and even as a 3-tier you would have to use a 16" or 18" on the bottom. My home oven, which is standard size, won't fit anything larger than a 15". I wouldn't have any problem saying to these people "logistically what you're asking for can't be done in my kitchen". If you'd like to do it, suggest a smaller "main" cake supplemented with sheets.

FullHouse Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 3:38pm
post #5 of 10

I completely agree with Kelleym. I like the sheet cake idea, and would also give the option of a cake with more tiers. Another option for you is to look into buying half round pans which are available to create larger cakes, if you can get them wholesale they really aren't that expensive, I'm sure the profit for a wedding cake would still be worth it.

indydebi Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 4:24pm
post #6 of 10

Even with a commercial kitchen, I wouldn't want to do a 3-tier cake to serve 200. (I think it would look fat and squatty .... not pretty at all.) And a 2-tier? icon_confused.gif I would tell a bride that we can do a 5-tier cake for that many people (6/8/10/12/14 serves 20icon_cool.gif.

Any idea how they came up with 2-3 tiers, or why they specifically want just 2 or 3 tiers?

I like all of the suggestions k8 made.

dsevans Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 6:54pm
post #7 of 10

if you reallyt want the cake i would suggest more tiers, the only reason i could come up with why a bride would even think ( or want ) only a two tier to feed 200 is maybe for some reason she thinks it will be cheaper, in any case good luck with whatever you decide

CakeForte Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 7:53pm
post #8 of 10

If you don't even want to bother just say......"Thank you so much for considering me, but unfortunately I am not available on that date."

No need to tell them all of the reasons and logistics as to why you can't do the cake.

Or, in addition to the PP, see if they are open to the cake being square...to get the number of servings that way.

marmalade1687 Posted 9 Feb 2009 , 8:19pm
post #9 of 10

It could just be a case of misinformation - she may think that a 2-tier serves 200 people! I have had MANY people call/email looking for prices on a 2-tier cake to serve 150 people, or the opposite...a 5-tier cake to serve 50. They may just need some guidance from you. icon_biggrin.gif

thelittlecakehouse Posted 10 Feb 2009 , 2:41am
post #10 of 10

She wanted a 2-3 tier (grooms) cake so it wouldnt compete with the wedding cake (?). But as it turns out she wanted me to do the cake for under $100 and not my price of $400.

Thanks so much for all the input.

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