Fbct??? A Few Questions!

Decorating By Niquie Updated 8 Feb 2009 , 4:52am by Niquie

Niquie Posted 7 Feb 2009 , 1:26pm
post #1 of 8

Hi all,
I am wanting to try FBCTs on my next cake, but I was wondering, do they give at all? Meaning, do they allow for any bending or do they just lay flat in order to not break? If so, does anyone know of anything else I could use on the sides of round cakes that will bend but are flat images. I don't have access to an edible image printer either, so any help with this would be awesome. Thanks so much in advance!!!

P.S. I would also like to stay away from fondant with this one, but I guess if you guys think that would be best, that's what I'll go with. Thanks.


Ashley

7 replies
Monkess Posted 7 Feb 2009 , 3:45pm
post #2 of 8

FBCT do have a certain give, they will not crack if you dont make it too thin. Thicker the better really.
I wont know how they will hold up on the side of a cake, even if it were to bend-i would think it might not adhere properly.
Good luck!

cake-angel Posted 7 Feb 2009 , 3:51pm
post #3 of 8

Why not tape waxed paper or parchment to the sides of the cake pan and pipe the transfer on that in sections. Then it would already be curved and you could attach it to the cake. That is waht we do if we want curved pieces of colorflow or chocolate transfers for the sides of a cake.

Monkess Posted 7 Feb 2009 , 3:58pm
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cake-angel

Why not tape waxed paper or parchment to the sides of the cake pan and pipe the transfer on that in sections. Then it would already be curved and you could attach it to the cake. That is waht we do if we want curved pieces of colorflow or chocolate transfers for the sides of a cake.


That DOES make sense, but how do you ensure the fbct will stick and not fall off when moved?

cake-angel Posted 7 Feb 2009 , 4:07pm
post #5 of 8

Well - first of all you wouldn't go all the way around the pan. You do quarter sections one at a time (or on different pans.) Make sure you keep your paper taped to the pan and you keep your transfer upright and lying flat (pan sits on its side in the freezer - may need propped) Once the transfer is frozen - lay a fresh piece of parchment over the top and gently untape your paper from the pan. Slide it gently off the pan and gently position on cake with some fresh buttercream to stick it with. The parchment on top is just to help not get finger prints in it during the transfer and to protect it from the heat from your hands a bit.
I should say I haven't ever done this with a FBCT but theoretically it should work. I have done it with colorflows and chocolate before though.

cake-angel Posted 7 Feb 2009 , 4:11pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkess

Quote:
Originally Posted by cake-angel

Why not tape waxed paper or parchment to the sides of the cake pan and pipe the transfer on that in sections. Then it would already be curved and you could attach it to the cake. That is waht we do if we want curved pieces of colorflow or chocolate transfers for the sides of a cake.

That DOES make sense, but how do you ensure the fbct will stick and not fall off when moved?




Since I haven't actually done it with FBCT I guess I can't say for sure. I would think that the FBCT as it thaws will become part of the icing on the cake. I supppose it may depend on how heavy they are.

jlynnw Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 4:29am
post #7 of 8

I am new to the shorthand - FBCT what is that? icon_confused.gificon_confused.gif

Niquie Posted 8 Feb 2009 , 4:52am
post #8 of 8

Thanks, I'll have to try that method.

FBCT is also known as "Frozen Butter Cream Transfer".

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