The Ultimate Stupid Cake Question

Decorating By fondantfrenzy Updated 19 Feb 2009 , 4:57am by Cakepro

fondantfrenzy Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 1:42am
post #1 of 22

Ok here it goes everyone, is it possible to use a cake ring to kinda like a giant cookie cutter like on a sheet cake to make a round cake? Sorry if this doesnt even make sense.

21 replies
FairyPoppins Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:04am
post #2 of 22

Do you mean you want to use a round cake pan as a cookie cutter? I'm assuming you want to bake a sheet cake and then press the round cake pan into it to make it a round cake.

I've never tried it but I think it might squash the sides down too much. Sorry I'm not much help.

fondantfrenzy Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:32am
post #3 of 22

No I attached a picture. It looks like it has sharp edges to where if you pressed it it would cut it, but I dont want to ruin a whole sheet cake.
LL

shadowgypsie Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:38am
post #4 of 22

If your using one of those ring forms that are about 3" in height and look like a giant cookie cutter anyway, I'd say sure just press gently so as not to split the cake.

bethola Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:38am
post #5 of 22

I actually have some "cake cutters" that are plastic. Haven't tried them yet. A friend bought them for me a long time ago and I've never opened them. They are shaped like a daisy and a heart.

Beth in KY

sayhellojana Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:41am
post #6 of 22

Cool the cake first and it should work. May i ask why you want to do this instead of just baking a round cake?

sugarwishes Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:42am
post #7 of 22

It will work fine. I've used a heart cookie cutter and ha no problem. I refridgerated the cake first.

tripleD Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:43am
post #8 of 22

Don't call it a dumb question. It's a curious one.
Yes, I use a heart shaped one and a star shaped before I invested in the pan Sets. I used them on a thinner cake like about 1 inch thick then like torted the layers to make a higher cake the thicker you make it.its more likley to crack. hope this helps thumbs_up.gif

SUUMEME Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:45am
post #9 of 22

I would freeze it for a few hours first then cut it and decorate it while it is frozen so the raw edges don't crumble. Good luck- it will work.

Skirt Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:49am
post #10 of 22

Those rings look like the ones you can put in a cake to support a tier above. Is that what they really are? Now I'm curious. icon_smile.gif

EnjoyTheCake Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 2:56am
post #11 of 22

Rings are often used to cut a cake to shape. I have used them to make ice cream and gelato cakes. When you have to cut the cake to shape, then fill with the frozen stuff.

It is best to cut the cake when it is nice and chilled or even frozen this helps prevent it from squishing as you cut. Also be very careful not to cut your hands. As you see both edges can be sharp. Use gloves or a towel to keep from cutting your hands as you press the ring into the cake.

Good Luck.

MaloSlatko Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 3:23am
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Quote:


Those rings look like the ones you can put in a cake to support a tier above. Is that what they really are?




Skirt, those are called tart rings over here. They are used by chefs to make a pastry shell with a baking sheet underneath as the bottom. I have also seen them used to assemble mousse filled or frozen desserts.

For example, you put one of those on a plate, then put down a thin layer of say sponge inside then proceed to layer with whatever filling. Then refridgerate/freeze the whole thing.

When it comes time to unmould, you just take off the side, perhaps warming it up first with a torch or hairdryer so it comes away cleanly.

I have seen the same chefs on TV use the ring to cut out a round from sheet and it seemed to work for them.

Hope that helps.

fondantfrenzy Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 3:28am
post #13 of 22

Thank you all for your help!!! Ok so now to answer your question why I would want to do this? Well first off, I can bake a sheet cake and get several smaller ones. I really dont like putting two pans in the oven, my cakes dont come out right. The other reason which i am embarrased to say is that when I bake round cake and I try to trim the edges to make it a nice smooth round cake I mess it all up and it turns into an oblong. I just dont have a good hand at cutting evenly and nicely.

I am glad you all responded, and thanks for telling me its nice and sharp becuase i was wondering if it was sharp. I am planning on using it on the cake when its like chilled or frozen.

sayhellojana Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 3:30am
post #14 of 22

Sounds like you need a leveler. Are you leveling your cakes when they are cooled or warm? Are you using a knife, too? And baking two round pans in the same oven shouldn't be a problem. I do it all the time. Maybe reduce your oven temp?

Skirt Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 6:44am
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lekoli

Quote:
Quote:


Those rings look like the ones you can put in a cake to support a tier above. Is that what they really are?



Skirt, those are called tart rings over here. They are used by chefs to make a pastry shell with a baking sheet underneath as the bottom. I have also seen them used to assemble mousse filled or frozen desserts.

For example, you put one of those on a plate, then put down a thin layer of say sponge inside then proceed to layer with whatever filling. Then refridgerate/freeze the whole thing.

When it comes time to unmould, you just take off the side, perhaps warming it up first with a torch or hairdryer so it comes away cleanly.

I have seen the same chefs on TV use the ring to cut out a round from sheet and it seemed to work for them.

Hope that helps.




Thanks. I had only seen them used as supports. Now I know! icon_smile.gif

Cakepro Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 7:37am
post #16 of 22

Yes, I have a set of those rings and use them exactly as you've described - to cut rounds from half-sheets. icon_smile.gif

fondantfrenzy Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 2:24am
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Yes, I have a set of those rings and use them exactly as you've described - to cut rounds from half-sheets. icon_smile.gif




Thank you very much for responding, do you freeze your cakes? How do you do it to make sure that it doesnt fall apart?

Cakepro Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 6:00am
post #18 of 22

Partially freezing them will definitely help you get good, clean cuts with minimal crumbs and tearing. I don't freeze them all the way, though. icon_smile.gif

fondantfrenzy Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 4:04pm
post #19 of 22

Thank you CakePro, what is the largest size you have? I think ihave only seen 10 inch ones, do you have any larger ones?

Cakepro Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 6:39pm
post #20 of 22

I have the rings up to 7" and use them primarily for making small top tiers (4, 5, 6, and 7 inches). The smallest ones (2" and 3") I haven't used yet because I can't stand doing little bitty cakes but I do use them as cookie cutters. icon_smile.gif Anything larger than 7" I just bake in a regular pan as it doesn't provide me any benefit to bake sheet cakes to cut out cake circles larger than 7" - too much waste.

fondantfrenzy Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 4:08am
post #21 of 22

Thanks, you know, it just boils down to me not being able to trim my cake perfectly for a circle cake...its bad enough i have challenges with the square cake. Sharon Zambito 's dvd makes it look way to easy...bottom line i just suck at it..ha ha ha hah a

Cakepro Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 4:57am
post #22 of 22

Awww, I bet you don't suck at it.

Sharon makes everything look so easy. icon_biggrin.gif

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