Icing A Cake Issues/question

Decorating By k33bl3r Updated 5 Feb 2009 , 8:22pm by k33bl3r

k33bl3r Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 8:01pm
post #1 of 14

So, I've found that my cakes bake up with a raised edge, which causes me to cut them off. Which leaves me crumbs. Now, I've brushed the cake with a pain brush to get the crumbs off, but still have a difficult time getting a nice smooth frosting on, even after doing a crumb coating first. Should I let the cake cool to room temp before cutting, put it in the fridge for a while? I'm so frustrated.

Also was wondering if it was a good idea to warm up my icing and kinda pour it onto the cake for a more even and relatively flat coating.

13 replies
indydebi Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 8:23pm
post #2 of 14

When you say a raised "edge", do you mean the dome that normally gets trimmed off ot make a flat cake, or do you mean the actual "edge" of the cake?

If you're talking about doming, turn the cake upside down so the bottom (or what I call the "butt") side of the cake is facing up ... the cut side is facing down on the cardboard...... no crumbs.

mezzyc Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 8:37pm
post #3 of 14

It's best to let your cake cool before cutting it. I also find that when I wrap it in plastic after it is cooled and let it sit for a bit the edges get a little softer and are easier to cut. It also helps when you are cutting to do a small cut on one side, stop, turn it around and cut from the other side coming out where you did your first cut. I learned that trick in my Wilton class. Indydebi's suggestion for turning it over after cutting is of course the best way to have a clean flat top!
Good luck.
Cori

Joshsmom Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 8:38pm
post #4 of 14

I rarely have to cut the domes on my cakes anymore ...... a tip I learned a long time ago here on CC

When you take your cake out of the oven I set a clean cotton weave towel over my pan and take something heavy (I use my big ham wooden board) and set that on top of the towel. Make sure the heavy object you use extends over the entire cake pan. You want just enough pressure to smoosh the dome down.

I leave that on for 5 min or so and then take off the object and towel and let the cake cool - no cutting, no crumbs.

I do still flip my cake so the bottom is the top like indydebi mentioned.

Forgot to add that this works great on cupcakes if you don't want the dome or if you want to make them all even.

SeriousCakes Posted 4 Feb 2009 , 1:40am
post #5 of 14

I used to have a tons of crumbs in my frosting until I started using the icer tip. SO much easier to frost a cake now!!
http://youtube.com/watch?v=iqvL4zhVbE8&feature=channel_page

k33bl3r Posted 4 Feb 2009 , 2:19am
post #6 of 14

I meant literally the edges. I don't generally have to cut the top off of the cake, cause I turn it upside down.

But what about melting the frosting and pouring it over. Does it work? Will it make quick work of my 30+ minute frostings?

Malakin Posted 4 Feb 2009 , 3:18am
post #7 of 14

I had that problem....I changed my cake recipe....now all of them come out pretty well completely even and when turned upside down, I don't have to trim hardly ever.

k33bl3r Posted 4 Feb 2009 , 4:01pm
post #8 of 14

I can't afford all of the ingredients for the cake and frosting, since a box of cake is only 99 cent. So that's what I'm using right now. icon_sad.gif

k33bl3r Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 5:35pm
post #9 of 14

So, has no one poured their frosting onto their cakes before? Is that why no one is answering that question? lol.

butterfly831915 Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 5:46pm
post #10 of 14

I have poured before and really wouldn't recommend it unless you are going for a poured look. I would use the icing tip. I will get a few crumbs but not bad at all, it also helps with getting a equal amount of icing on the entire cake. I can really tell the difference. Are you using store icing or making your own? that could play a factor. I like the viva method or roller method for crusting buttercream. It is becoming my life saver and after doing it a few times, I have been able to speed up time it takes too.... Good luck hope you get more answers. As far as the ruff edges of the cake I would possibly try taking the baking time down about 25 degrees, that helped me a lot.

kimbers Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 5:48pm
post #11 of 14

I did see a reciepe in the reciepe section for poured icing. I've been meaning to try it. It would be worth it to see if it works for you. Would probably save time if that is the look you're going for.

__Jamie__ Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 5:56pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by k33bl3r

I meant literally the edges. I don't generally have to cut the top off of the cake, cause I turn it upside down.




Wow...stumped! Is the cake sticking to the pan when you turn it out? Are you using cake release? Hmmmmm. Make sure you aren't digging into the sides and edges when crumb coating, perhaps that's the problem, and you are pulling up crumbs.

BCJean Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 6:07pm
post #13 of 14

A poured icing is going to be a different texture, it will not be light and fluffy. Were you going to pour just the top or the sides also? I think getting a good poured icing finish would be more difficult than smoothing the icing would be.

I agree with using a quick icer....no crumbs, fast, easy.

k33bl3r Posted 5 Feb 2009 , 8:22pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie85364

Wow...stumped! Is the cake sticking to the pan when you turn it out? Are you using cake release? Hmmmmm. Make sure you aren't digging into the sides and edges when crumb coating, perhaps that's the problem, and you are pulling up crumbs.




The cake doesn't stick at all. It comes out very easily with the PAM I spray on the pan. I also tried the rose nail trick so it would come out level, and it didn't work.

I was actually thinking of trying the poured icing over petite fours.

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