5 Cakes All At Once!

Business By lizadams Updated 15 Feb 2009 , 3:14am by lizadams

lizadams Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 3:15pm
post #1 of 51

Help! I have 4 cakes due all on the same day which is Saturday and this is Monday. Does anyone know how I can get them all done without doing them too early?
Thanks,
Dena's Sweet Delights
www.denasdelights.com

50 replies
indydebi Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 3:29pm
post #2 of 51

The freezer isyour friend. Bake now and store in the freezer. Cakes can thaw in as little as 15 minutes to an hour or two (dpending on size).

shorty56 Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 3:31pm
post #3 of 51

you could have baked last week and frozen them, then pulled them out on wednesday or thursday this week to start working on them. at this point, you could either bake them today and freeze till wednesday, or just bake them on wednesday. depends on which day you'll have the most time. any extra decorations you can make in advance you should go ahead and make (like flowers, figurines, etc). make and color all your icing in advance (today or tomorrow) so that you won't have to do that this weekend.

honestly, if you weren't prepared to handle that many cakes in a day, you should have turned one or two down.

loriemoms Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 5:08pm
post #4 of 51

Deb is so correct....the freezer is your friend!!

You can bake cakes today or tuesday and even freezing for one day helps alot. Its not unsual for me to do 4 cakes in a day, but if you feel you can't, then I would start on Thursday afternoon and try to get two done thursday afternoon/evening and then the next two on Friday. Do the fondant ones first if you have them as they stay fresher longer.
If you are using perishable fillings, make sure you treat them that way!
good luck! I find orders are like your paycheck. The more you take in, the more you will find you can do!

MacsMom Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 5:26pm
post #5 of 51

Freezing cakes honestly does seem to make them better. I always freeze my cakes! I have even frozen a few cakes that were completely decorated in fondant.

You just have to thaw them in the fridge overnight, and then give them at least 3 hrs out of the fridge for the condensation to dry. If it hasn't dried completely after 3 hrs, then you can use a hair-dryer to dry the cake instantly.

loriemoms Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 6:13pm
post #6 of 51

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?

MacsMom Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 6:42pm
post #7 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?




It's because of the steam that gets trapped in a frozen state (freeze while still warm!). Those frozen particles of steam add mositure when the cake thaws, making it seem a little more dense.

CindiM Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 12:53am
post #8 of 51

lizadams, If you have everything ready to go and all you're doing is assembly, you will be fine.
I agree freeze your cakes. I freeze my buttercream, too.

When I am thawing everything, I start my list.

I write down everything I have to do and check it off as I go.
Like level & fill #1 cake, 2,3,&4. Make white chocolate mousse for cake 2. Make grapes, birthday placque for Brittany, make baby pink fondant, make pink ribbon & bow, Measure fondant for cake 3. Cover cake 3 & box for 10am pick up.
That way I stay focussed. If I have to go home because I have run out of gas, mentally, I can see what I can do Saturday when I come in and which cake is being picked up or delivered first. You can do it! icon_cool.gif

Deb_ Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 1:16am
post #9 of 51

I find it easy to do all the prep in the beginning of the week as others have suggested, make your fillings and icing today or tonight (now) icon_rolleyes.gif Than work in an assembly line fashion.

For example if it were me I'd level, torte and fill all the cakes at the same time. Next, I'd crumbcoat all of them let them rest and set overnight. (Thursday)

The next day final icing and fondant (if any) on all the cakes.(Fri. morning)

Than final decorating. (Friday afternoon/evening)

I find as long as ALL my icing and decorations are made and ready to go, it really speeds things along. You don't want to have to stop and make icings halfway through decorating. I've also started freezing my BC in gallon freezer bags, especially for a busy order week, it just saves so much time and it's a lot neater than having PS all over the place while your assembling the cakes.

Good luck with your orders, as long as you manage your time you'll be fine. Make a list if you think it will help and check things off as you complete them.

snarkybaker Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 1:27am
post #10 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?



It's because of the steam that gets trapped in a frozen state (freeze while still warm!). Those frozen particles of steam add mositure when the cake thaws, making it seem a little more dense.




NEVER!!!! wrap a warm cake. Trapping the warm, moist air creates a wonderfully hospitable for all sorts of bacteria. It's against all safe food handling protocol.

loriemoms Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 12:41pm
post #11 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?



It's because of the steam that gets trapped in a frozen state (freeze while still warm!). Those frozen particles of steam add mositure when the cake thaws, making it seem a little more dense.



NEVER!!!! wrap a warm cake. Trapping the warm, moist air creates a wonderfully hospitable for all sorts of bacteria. It's against all safe food handling protocol.




Oh I agree completely! Not only does it make it unsafe, but I think it makes the cake out and out soggy. It is also very difficult to handle a warm cake. I still say there is something about freezing it that makes it denser. Even if it is not warm, there must be something about ice crystals...

camille1380 Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 12:58pm
post #12 of 51

It is safe to frezze them unwrapped?

loriemoms Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 1:05pm
post #13 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by camille1380

It is safe to frezze them unwrapped?




I would never freeze a cake unwrapped! It would not get terribly freezer burned, but it would obsorb all the smalles of the freezer and taste awful!
Just let your cakes cool for a few hours..I read an article the safe temp is 78 degrees. So use a quick temp theometer to be safe.

Deb_ Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 1:08pm
post #14 of 51

txkat..........I've always felt the same as you about freezing warm or hot cakes right away, but many others here say they do it and the freezer will "destroy the Bacteria". I took the following off of the Food Safety Government web site. I don't think it's a good idea to freeze anything while it's still warm/hot, I hope people that do this with cakes will reconsider or do some research before continuing to do this.


Does Freezing Destroy Bacteria & Parasites?
Freezing to 0 °F inactivates any microbes -- bacteria, yeasts and molds - - present in food. Once thawed, however, these microbes can again become active, multiplying under the right conditions to levels that can lead to foodborne illness. Since they will then grow at about the same rate as microorganisms on fresh food, you must handle thawed items as you would any perishable food.

Trichina and other parasites can be destroyed by sub-zero freezing temperatures. However, very strict government-supervised conditions must be met. It is not recommended to rely on home freezing to destroy trichina. Thorough cooking will destroy all parasites.

cakesdivine Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 1:52pm
post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?



It's because of the steam that gets trapped in a frozen state (freeze while still warm!). Those frozen particles of steam add mositure when the cake thaws, making it seem a little more dense.



NEVER!!!! wrap a warm cake. Trapping the warm, moist air creates a wonderfully hospitable for all sorts of bacteria. It's against all safe food handling protocol.




This has been discussed over & over. You most certainly CAN wrap a warm and hot cake and freeze it. The baking process kills all bacteria inside the cake. END OF STORY!

Deb_ Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 2:21pm
post #16 of 51

So you "rebake" after you've taken it out of the freezer?

Just to clarify........
We're talking about the bacteria that could form AFTER the cake has been baked and when it's frozen hot from the oven (or warm. )

So therefore the theory of the "baking kills the bacteria" doesn't apply to what we are talking about.

SweetArt Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 3:47pm
post #17 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?



It's because of the steam that gets trapped in a frozen state (freeze while still warm!). Those frozen particles of steam add mositure when the cake thaws, making it seem a little more dense.



NEVER!!!! wrap a warm cake. Trapping the warm, moist air creates a wonderfully hospitable for all sorts of bacteria. It's against all safe food handling protocol.



This has been discussed over & over. You most certainly CAN wrap a warm and hot cake and freeze it. The baking process kills all bacteria inside the cake. END OF STORY!




Yes, the bacteria IS killed when you bake. The problem comes after, when the cake is thawed. The excess steam of a hot cake gets trapped in the cake. The cake, when thawed, becomes really moist. A perfect environment for new bacteria (bacteria just falls from the air) to begin to grow and breed. An excessively moist cake increases it's perishability. It can become a health hazard. So, it really isn't a safe practice.

I also find freezing makes my cakes a little denser. I don't know why either. I level all my cakes at two inches. The cakes that come out of the freezer are slightly shorter by about 1/8 of an inch. Only really noticeable when set next to a fresh cake.

cakesdivine Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 3:51pm
post #18 of 51

But in order for there to be an issue the cake would have to sit for very long periods of time and be exposed to alot of contaminates. I have used this method for over 20 years! AND NEVER HAVE HAD ANY MOLD OR OTHER ISSUES. The cake just doesn't last long enough icon_smile.gif. The cake is iced well before it thaws enough to be an issue.

MacsMom Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 4:04pm
post #19 of 51

Controversial? icon_rolleyes.gif

I find it hard to believe that a clean, wrapped cake will harbor a host of "new" bacteria when it is thawed, still wrapped, in the refrigerator.

I would think a cake left to cool on the counter, unwrapped, would be more likely to attract bacteria. Suppose my sick 4 yr old walks into the kitchen and sneezes? (I know, that was a silly scenario).

Safe food handling guides say to refrigerate leftover food preferably while still warm to keep most harmful bacteria from growing and multiplying.

So if cooking kills bacteria and freezing/refrigerating stops/stunts their growth, I'm not worried about it.

1234me Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 6:03pm
post #20 of 51

I wish I only had four cakes for this weekend. I have taken on too much for a show a run on my own. Here is my process:
bake cakes on Monday and Tuesday
make buttercream on Tuesday (Made 30 lbs of it today!)
I will decorate a few Thursday night for orders going out on Friday
decorate some Friday for Saturday orders
decorate some on Saturday for Sunday orders

B**** and complain to my husband I work too hard for too little pay, then Sunday, work on Valentine cookie orders!

***Moderator Edited*** thumbs_up.gif

cakesbycathy Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 6:08pm
post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by shorty56



honestly, if you weren't prepared to handle that many cakes in a day, you should have turned one or two down.




The OP came for some advice. I don't think she also needed a lecture on time management. I'm sure there was a much nicer way to have put that. icon_cool.gif

Kay_NL Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 6:19pm
post #22 of 51

To the hair dryer person, do you have a hair dryer dedicated only to cakes??

I usually let my cake cool completely before freezing!

MacsMom Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 6:38pm
post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kay_NL

To the hair dryer person, do you have a hair dryer dedicated only to cakes??

I usually let my cake cool completely before freezing!




I've only ever had to use it twice out of over 100 cakes. Once was because it was raining outside and the condensation just hung around, the other time was because I had frozen a fondant covered cake and it hadn't thawed completely in the fridge before I took it out to finish thawing.

I don't dedicate a hair-dryer for this purpose because it's rare that it's needed in my case (I don't live in a humid environment). I can't see why you would need to dedicate one since it is just directing a blast of air towards your cake.

Deb_ Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 7:51pm
post #24 of 51

I've been spending the past 1/2 hr searching for more conclusive info. on the whole freezing/defrosting issue. The 2 articles below explain it pretty well. It seems defrosting a cake or anything on the counter at room temp., plays a role in the development of bacteria. (nothing new, we've all heard this before)
After researching this I will not defrost my cakes or anything else for that matter at room temp. It's just not worth the risk. I'll defrost in the fridge from this day forward.
We can all say, I've been doing it for years and nobody's died yet, yes true, but who knows, maybe those stomach aches we sometimes get are to blame for someone not handling our food correctly. I don't think it's worth the risk. Especially since we are selling these products to clients that put their trust in us that we are following the suggested safe food handling guidelines.
If something as simple as just thawing it in the fridge is the only change I need to make, I can handle that for piece of mind's sake.


About the freezing process
Water is the primary element of fresh food and usually makes up between 50-90% of the weight of the product. Freezing is a way of maintaining these water levels and temporarily preventing the growth of micro-organisms and bacteria, as the lack of moisture renders them unable to multiply when the water freezes to ice.

When fresh food is quick frozen, the cold penetrates rapidly, freezing the water and forming a large amount of small ice crystals. The smaller the ice crystals, the better the food quality after defrosting.

If food is frozen slowly, a smaller amount of large ice crystals tend to form. This means that as the water freezes and expands, the cell walls of the food expand and rupture causing structural damage to the food. This is why sometimes certain foods will be limp or mushy when thawed or just taste and feel different on eating.

  
The faster a food is frozen the better, so make sure that you use the "fast freeze" option if you have one or that you place the unfrozen product at the bottom of the freezer, which is the coldest location, so that it freezes faster than it would in a warmer area.

If you have several items to freeze, spread them out away from each other until they have completely frozen and they will also freeze quicker.

The ideal temperature at which to store food items in the freezer for long periods of time is 0°F (-18°C) or below. Foods stored at temperatures above 0°F will be prone to minimal bacteria activity, food spoilage and deterioration. At 0°F bacteria are inactivated, nutrients are retained and deterioration is at its lowest. spr
© Copyright 2001-2009 helpwithcooking.com
spr
Bacteria and freezing
Bacteria, whether harmful or not, are not destroyed through the freezing process, as they are through the cooking process. They are merely put out of activity for the duration of the time that the frozen product is actually frozen solid. During this time bacteria, yeasts and moulds are unable to multiply, as they need water or moisture to do so.

Once the product is being thawed though, it's another matter. As soon as food begins to defrost, temperatures rise and moisture is present, bacteria will start to grow. If the item is thawed at a temperature above 40°F (5°C) bacteria will multiply rapidly in a very short time and could lead to food poisoning and severe illness.

For this reason, it is very important to defrost food slowly and safely, preferably overnight in the refrigerator. spr
© Copyright 2001-2009 helpwithcooking.com

MacsMom Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 8:48pm
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly27

Bacteria and freezing
Bacteria, whether harmful or not, are not destroyed through the freezing process, as they are through the cooking process. They are merely put out of activity for the duration of the time that the frozen product is actually frozen solid. During this time bacteria, yeasts and moulds are unable to multiply, as they need water or moisture to do so.

Once the product is being thawed though, it's another matter. As soon as food begins to defrost, temperatures rise and moisture is present, bacteria will start to grow. If the item is thawed at a temperature above 40°F (5°C) bacteria will multiply rapidly in a very short time and could lead to food poisoning and severe illness.

For this reason, it is very important to defrost food slowly and safely, preferably overnight in the refrigerator. spr
© Copyright 2001-2009 helpwithcooking.com
[/b]




But we're talking cakes here. Food borne illnesses come mainly from meats, infected eggs, and produce that has been pooped on.

I can see worrying about leaving chicken out on the counter to thaw, but not a sugar-heavy cake. Salmonella in eggs is very rare and doesn't stop me from licking the spatula or giving my kids bites of cookie dough (I've been eating cookie dough since my mom let me have bites as a kid), so I'm not going to get paranoid over cooked eggs that have been beaten to smithereens, baked in loads of sugar, frozen, and thawed in the fridge.

It makes a deliciously moist cake! It's not a practice I want to change.

Cakepro Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 8:58pm
post #26 of 51

LOL, I wonder if the people who view frozen-while-hot or thawed-at-room-temp cakes as deadly bacterial filth zones also think that one can catch a cold by walking outside on a cold day with wet hair.

ZAKIA6 Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 9:05pm
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Freezing cakes honestly does seem to make them better. I always freeze my cakes! I have even frozen a few cakes that were completely decorated in fondant.

You just have to thaw them in the fridge overnight, and then give them at least 3 hrs out of the fridge for the condensation to dry. If it hasn't dried completely after 3 hrs, then you can use a hair-dryer to dry the cake instantly.




this is great to know! icon_biggrin.gif

summernoelle Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 9:12pm
post #28 of 51

The only advice I can really give is be as organized as possible. I even sometimes write out time lines about what I do on what days, in what order. Sounds cheesy, but it really, really helps.
I also am I fan of freezing when needed.
Good luck! Let us know how it goes.

Deb_ Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 9:14pm
post #29 of 51

You guys can laugh all you want at it, but if thawing in the fridge is recommended and is proven to cut down on the growth of bacteria, why would you not do it?

I'm showing you the documentation that I found while researching, it's repeated over and over again on many other sites. I don't think it's necessary to post them all here, just google it.

It's one thing to lick a spoon of cake batter, who hasn't done that? That is not what we're talking about. Besides, I don't allow my clients to eat my raw cake/cookie batter anyway as I'm sure you don't.

We are talking about the steam that is trapped inside a tightly wrapped hot cake. That steam/water is where bacteria will develop. (as stated in the article, bacteria needs water to develop/grow) Especially if it's not "flash frozen". It will freeze and retard any further growth of bacteria while frozen, but while defrosting, the bacteria will become active again, especially when defrosted in an environment above 40 deg.

Everything I've read today supports that above theory, the only place I've read that it's bull is from the few people that have posted here. I think I'll trust the experts and scientists that have researched it. Unless you can show me studies that dispute it.

It sums up to.......wrap a COOLED cake, freeze it, defrost it in the refrigerator. What's so hard about that? Seems silly to dispute. Nobody's telling us to NOT freeze the cakes, that's not the issue at all.
I guess I'd rather err on the side of caution, hey I don't walk under ladders either. icon_wink.gif

tonedna Posted 3 Feb 2009 , 9:20pm
post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

I think freezing makes the cake alittle denser too...or is that my imagination?



It's because of the steam that gets trapped in a frozen state (freeze while still warm!). Those frozen particles of steam add mositure when the cake thaws, making it seem a little more dense.



NEVER!!!! wrap a warm cake. Trapping the warm, moist air creates a wonderfully hospitable for all sorts of bacteria. It's against all safe food handling protocol.



This has been discussed over & over. You most certainly CAN wrap a warm and hot cake and freeze it. The baking process kills all bacteria inside the cake. END OF STORY!




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