Confession!

Decorating By DaCakeDiva Updated 28 Feb 2009 , 9:06am by zdebssweetsj

DaCakeDiva Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:24pm
post #1 of 56

I've taken all 4 count 'em 4 Wilton classes and I still can't make a rose. Not a ribbon, not a fondant, not a buttercream. NOTHING! What's wrong with me?

55 replies
costumeczar Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:28pm
post #2 of 56

I can't make buttercream roess very well either...I can make really good gumpaste and chocolate ones, though, so maybe you should just try another medium!

gerripje Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:28pm
post #3 of 56

I haven't taken any classes but for the last 5 months I have watched and read everything I can find on the internet how to do roses and I can kind of make a nice gum paste rose, but as for buttercream forget it! They are always flat and smoochy and look more like cabbages than anything!

weirkd Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:30pm
post #4 of 56

Some things just takes lots of practice! It took me a while to learn how to do a gumpaste rose to stay on a wire! But once you get it, its like riding a bike!
I see you live in MD, maybe if you want a private lesson, I can show you how to do some GP flowers and my method of doing them.

cvoges Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:31pm
post #5 of 56

There's nothing wrong with you. Roses are a pain and require more practice and work with technique and icing consistency than most people can imagine. The only way I can make a rose is by using Roland Winbeckler's recipe, and piping it on the handle of a wooden spoon. I went through several batches of icing before I could make a decent rose. Just hang in there and keep trying. HTH

miss_sweetstory Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:31pm
post #6 of 56

There is NOTHING wrong with you. It will come.

Have you tried to make them on a skewer? I can't make a decent BC rose on a nail, but I pretty happy with my skewer roses.

Larrimore Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:32pm
post #7 of 56

I have read in the forums to use hershey kisses for the base of the buttercream rose. Maybe that will help. And of course, practice, practice, practice

Ayanami Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:34pm
post #8 of 56

gerripje wrote

Quote:
Quote:

I haven't taken any classes but for the last 5 months I have watched and read everything I can find on the internet how to do roses and I can kind of make a nice gum paste rose, but as for buttercream forget it! They are always flat and smoochy and look more like cabbages than anything!




Cabbages! hahahahahahahaha! LMAO icon_lol.gif I totally know what you are talking about, cause that's pretty much how mine look 90% of the time!

aggiechef Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:43pm
post #9 of 56

Like the cabbage description...that's how my fondant roses looked in course 3...the buttercream ones will come in time....my Wilton instructor suggested using the canned icing instead of homemade and they actually came out looking like roses....try that and see if it helps...

jer702 Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:43pm
post #10 of 56

I struggled with the bc rose for the longest time, so I bought the Wilton can icing and just make sure your base is big enough to support it. When making the rose, I don't even bother unless i'm using the can stuff and just practice, practice..its one of those things that seems really hard until you get it down.

I'm stating fondant and gumpaste class on Tuesday and i'm so excited icon_biggrin.gif

Lorendabug Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:44pm
post #11 of 56

It just takes practice, practice, practice. I used to sit with a bowl of buttercream and just practice. Everyone has already posted some pretty good advice, just try and keep trying. I find that I love to make fondant or gumpaste roses/flowers. Buttercream can be tricky if it's not the right consistency. Just keep practicing, you will be able to do them in time.

cookieman Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:45pm
post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenLeeCakes

I've taken all 4 count 'em 4 Wilton classes and I still can't make a rose. Not a ribbon, not a fondant, not a buttercream. NOTHING! What's wrong with me?




Oh you are not alone!!! I can do very detailed work on cookies, bake delicious cakes and make wonderful desserts--but I cannot make a buttercream or fondant rose that does not look like it came from outer space to save my life! (I wish I could find someone in my area to give me a half day of private lessons just so I can learn to make them.)

tinygoose Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:47pm
post #13 of 56

LOL...that's funny. I can't make one either....I haven't tried too hard, and I'm always afraid someone is going to ask for a cake with a ton of bc roses. Oh well, I work better under pressure anyway. Don't be hard on yourself. Decorating is 80% believing you can and 20% practice (B. Weber).

Getus Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:49pm
post #14 of 56

I cannot make a decent rose the Wilton way...on a flower nail...however...I can whip some pretty ones using a stick! Have you tried that method? If not, give it a try. For me, it's much easier, faster, and I am able to do it with almost any icing. Most of all though...just keep practicing! You will get it! thumbs_up.gif

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 9:52pm
post #15 of 56

Everyone is right - it really does take a lot of practice. I've also found with those that I have taught it usually has to do with how you are holding your bag as well as the icing consistency. You need it to be pretty stiff but not so still that it hurts your hand! I have never tried making a rose on a stick/skewer but I know that a lot of people do and it does help with making your rose not look so flat.

The only recommendation I can make besides the way you might be holding your bag is how tall your base is. Also, I hate making roses with the 104 tip like most directions call for. I use a 124 ALWAYS. The only time I use a 104 or smaller is if I have to make tiny roses...

My roses are more than the standard 3, 5, 7 that Wilton teaches as well. It's usually like 3, 7, 9-12 or something like that...I like them to look fuller so I do it that way. Also, I think because I use a larger tip it does take more swipes to go around...Here is a picture of one of my roses...For me, close ups really help. Good Luck!

Tammi
LL

4kids Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:18pm
post #16 of 56

I have been decorating cakes for 3 years now. I still end up having to do like 3 or 4 roses before I get one I'm happy with.... now fondant roses are a different story. I can whip out a good fondant rose on the first try. I agree with costumeczar. You may just want to try another medium.

jer702 Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:27pm
post #17 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbroskoski

Everyone is right - it really does take a lot of practice. I've also found with those that I have taught it usually has to do with how you are holding your bag as well as the icing consistency. You need it to be pretty stiff but not so still that it hurts your hand! I have never tried making a rose on a stick/skewer but I know that a lot of people do and it does help with making your rose not look so flat.

The only recommendation I can make besides the way you might be holding your bag is how tall your base is. Also, I hate making roses with the 104 tip like most directions call for. I use a 124 ALWAYS. The only time I use a 104 or smaller is if I have to make tiny roses...

My roses are more than the standard 3, 5, 7 that Wilton teaches as well. It's usually like 3, 7, 9-12 or something like that...I like them to look fuller so I do it that way. Also, I think because I use a larger tip it does take more swipes to go around...Here is a picture of one of my roses...For me, close ups really help. Good Luck!

Tammi





WOW that rose is stunning. I will definately try with tip 124 and see how it turns out..Thanks

Ayanami Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:27pm
post #18 of 56

tbroskoski - icon_surprised.gif I'm so jealous! icon_eek.gif wow. thumbs_up.gif

jer702 Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:29pm
post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayanami

tbroskoski - icon_surprised.gif I'm so jealous! icon_eek.gif wow. thumbs_up.gif





I agree.

it didn't copy the picture...oh well, i'm still working out the kinks when posting replys..LOL

tonedna Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:31pm
post #20 of 56

I will say this, roses are no easy flowers.. they require practice, lots of practice. After you finally get it, is like riding a bycicle..You will never forget. Bit to learn is can be a real pain in the a$*
So keep trying, and practicing. It will eventually happen...
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

pkinkema Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:35pm
post #21 of 56

I'm taking an 8-hour buttercream class tomorrow!

My fondant & gumpaste flowers are pretty nice--but the buttercream roses are especially great when you can just cut thru them and serve. I get tired of pulling decorations off cake! Anyone else?

sillywabbitz Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 10:53pm
post #22 of 56

I gave up on buttercream roses and I don't have any training or experience with real gumpaste or fondant roses but I LOVE making duff roses... Simple adorable and super easier...I don't mind that people don't eat them as long as they're cute...to me they are more whimsical than realistic but so am I so I don't mindicon_smile.gif

You can see the walk through if you go to http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=888053
and follow the "previous" link at the top.

Good luck..I'm sure you will perfect your buttercream roses with time.

annacakes Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 11:43pm
post #23 of 56

If your roses are looking like cabbages, you need to pay attention to your tip position.

The centre petal is applied with your tip in the 11:00 position. This means that when you go to apply the petal, the wide end of the tip is positioned at the middle of the base and tilted in so that the tip opening is on the same angle as the base. Squeeze the bag and spin the flower nail simultaneously to wrap the petal around the top of the base.

For row of 3, the tip opening is held in the 12:00 position, this being straight up and down, so that if you held it up to a clock (with the back of the bag at 3:00)the tip opening would be pointing at the 12. Note that the center petal and the row of 3 are both applied at the same level on the base - the middle.

For row of 5, drop down the base and ANGLE the bag so the tip now would be pointing to 1:00 were you to hold it up to a clock.

Row of 7, drop down to the bottom of the base and tilt out even further so the tip opening is pointing at 2:00.

Cabbage-like roses happen because all petals are applied in the 12:00 position. You need to ANGLE the tip back for each row to have the petals furl out. So, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00. Keep saying it to yourself!

cookieman Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 12:46am
post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by annacakes

If your roses are looking like cabbages, you need to pay attention to your tip position.

The centre petal is applied with your tip in the 11:00 position. This means that when you go to apply the petal, the wide end of the tip is positioned at the middle of the base and tilted in so that the tip opening is on the same angle as the base. Squeeze the bag and spin the flower nail simultaneously to wrap the petal around the top of the base.

For row of 3, the tip opening is held in the 12:00 position, this being straight up and down, so that if you held it up to a clock (with the back of the bag at 3:00)the tip opening would be pointing at the 12. Note that the center petal and the row of 3 are both applied at the same level on the base - the middle.

For row of 5, drop down the base and ANGLE the bag so the tip now would be pointing to 1:00 were you to hold it up to a clock.

Row of 7, drop down to the bottom of the base and tilt out even further so the tip opening is pointing at 2:00.

Cabbage-like roses happen because all petals are applied in the 12:00 position. You need to ANGLE the tip back for each row to have the petals furl out. So, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00. Keep saying it to yourself!




Thanks for the very detailed instructions annacakes! That is very kind of you. But I think I know what my problem is now...my eyes started to glaze over halfway through reading this and my brain hurt from trying to figure out what I was supposed to be doing. I am MUCH BETTER at watching someone do something in person and then copying it. We all learn differently, and I fall into that category. I guess I'kll have to take a class someday!

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 12:55am
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jer702

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbroskoski

Everyone is right - it really does take a lot of practice. I've also found with those that I have taught it usually has to do with how you are holding your bag as well as the icing consistency. You need it to be pretty stiff but not so still that it hurts your hand! I have never tried making a rose on a stick/skewer but I know that a lot of people do and it does help with making your rose not look so flat.

The only recommendation I can make besides the way you might be holding your bag is how tall your base is. Also, I hate making roses with the 104 tip like most directions call for. I use a 124 ALWAYS. The only time I use a 104 or smaller is if I have to make tiny roses...

My roses are more than the standard 3, 5, 7 that Wilton teaches as well. It's usually like 3, 7, 9-12 or something like that...I like them to look fuller so I do it that way. Also, I think because I use a larger tip it does take more swipes to go around...Here is a picture of one of my roses...For me, close ups really help. Good Luck!

Tammi




WOW that rose is stunning. I will definately try with tip 124 and see how it turns out..Thanks




Thanks! I really hope it works out well for you. I just think that using a larger tip makes it a little easier so hopefully that is true for you too!

kakeladi Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 8:50pm
post #26 of 56

I agree b'cream roses need soooo much to come together: icing consistency; practice; mound size & shape; practice; tip position; practice; back of the bag pointing over your shoulder; practice; turning the nail just right while squeezing; practice, practice, practice, practice!!!!!!!! LOL

Now ribbon roses shouldn't be that much of a problem I do admit I am never happy w/the ones I make but there are many variations of them so mine pass in the darkicon_smile.gif

GP aren't that hard when using the 5 petal (all-in-one) cutter. When you're shown how, go home & practice a dz of them and you will end up remembering everything.

hammer1 Posted 1 Feb 2009 , 3:51am
post #27 of 56

love buttercream roses mixed with fondant specialty flowers....i agree with a poster above, like to be able to serve some of the flowers that the people will eat and not have to pull them all off....an doesn't every party have a kid or someone who wants the piece of cake with the rose on it!
practise, practise, practise.............. icon_smile.gif

hammer1 Posted 1 Feb 2009 , 3:52am
post #28 of 56

sorry double post...now if i could just learn how to keep that from happening.

4Gifts4Lisa Posted 1 Feb 2009 , 7:23am
post #29 of 56

Everyone gave great advice! You could also try making them on a flower nail #10, also called a "witches hat". You can get them at www.countrykitchensa.com . Some of my students swear by them, and I like them as well.

cookieman Posted 1 Feb 2009 , 3:01pm
post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4Gifts4Lisa

Everyone gave great advice! You could also try making them on a flower nail #10, also called a "witches hat". You can get them at www.countrykitchensa.com . Some of my students swear by them, and I like them as well.




LOL It does look like a witches hat. Thanks for the suggestion.

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