Sturdy Wedding Cake

Decorating By knsmith Updated 2 Feb 2009 , 3:36am by indydebi

knsmith Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 2:41pm
post #1 of 5

My best friend and her roommate recently decided to go in to the cake decorating business. I am having them make my wedding and groom's cakes, but we are having trouble finding a recipe. It needs to be a sturdy cake that can handle some pretty intense decorations and a pretty heavy cake topper. However, we want the cake to taste really good too. I was hoping to get a variety of flavor ideas, instead of plain old vanilla. The actual wedding cake can't have chocolate or almond in it anywhere, and the groom's cake can't have almond at all (due to some severe allergy issues). If anyone has any ideas, it would be greatly appreciated!

4 replies
kakeladi Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 12:15am
post #2 of 5

Here's the perfect recipe for you. Please read thru the whole thing before you start. The title of this is White Almond Sour Cream cake recipe BUT........it can be made in other flavors of cake mix and flavorings. You can leave out the almond altogether & flavor it anyway you want to. Note the extra info at the end. Enjoy your baking!

The *original* WASC cake recipe by kakeladi

1 box cake mix (I prefer Betty Crocker) *see notes at end
1 cup flour*
1 cup granulated sugar
generous dash of salt

1 cup sour cream*
1 cup water *
3 whole eggs
1 tablespoon flavoring*
In bowl mix together dry ingredients. It's helpful if you use a wire whisk, but optional. It's important w/choco cake not so much for other flavors.
In mixer bowl place next 3 ingredients. Add about 1/2 of the dry ingredients and blend together, then add the rest of the dry ingredients & blend. Mix for 2 minutes.
Pour into prepared pans * and bake as usual.

*NOTES: any cake flavor can be used. Match the flavoring to the cake flavor such use lemon for lemon cake; strawberry for a strawberry cake etc, etc. For most flavors you can use a mixture of vanilla, butter, and almond which is what I do most of the time.
Some tell me they just dump all ingredients into the bowl together. Some tell me they sift all dry ingredients together.
You can use juice, milk or cream for the liquid.
This recipe is based on mixing in a kitchenaid mixer. I use position #1 to stir it, then #4 to mix the batter.
Most of the time I forget to add the salticon_smile.gif
On rare occasions I have used other brands of mix.
This makes the amount of batter as if you used 1 1/2 mixes and is perfect for a 10" sq OR 9x13 OR one 8" & two 6" round;OR two 8"rounds OR a 12" round; and other combinations of pans.
I prefer to bake at 300 degrees for about 20-30 minutes (depending on size of cake) then turn oven up to 325 for about an equal time. If cake has pulled away from sides it is overbaked. After cooling, the top might be a bit sticky.
Some people have told me they use plain yogurt instead of sour cream.
I've always used all purpose flour. Some tell me they use cake flour but then the amount is less - maybe 3/4 cup - not sure.

KoryAK Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 12:26am
post #3 of 5

Your friend needs to learn (and fast if shes opening a business) that the cake doesn't really need to support much of anything. The layers will be supported by plates and dowels and the topper can be too if it is that heavy. I don't mean to upset you, but I would be very worried about trusting a cake like that to someone (friend or not) who doesn't even have a recipe yet. What else doesn't she know?

sarahpierce Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 2:06am
post #4 of 5

I love Alices Pound Cake. The recipe is in the recipe section here on CC. I would also be slightly worried about your friends making this cake and not being experienced. You also can not just open up a cake business. It takes a lot of money and time and tons of inspections. I would suggest your friends join this site. It is a wealth of information. I have learned so much here. Good luck either way. Please keep us updated.

indydebi Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 3:36am
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

Your friend needs to learn (and fast if shes opening a business) that the cake doesn't really need to support much of anything. The layers will be supported by plates and dowels and the topper can be too if it is that heavy. I don't mean to upset you, but I would be very worried about trusting a cake like that to someone (friend or not) who doesn't even have a recipe yet. What else doesn't she know?




I would agree. You can make a cake out of whipped cream and the upper tiers will be supported just fine ... by the support system.

Don't assume you need a heavy cake for the decor. I am a mix-baker and those cakes are not as dense as some of the scratch recipes ... yet the cakes supported the (few) fondant cakes I've done.

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